Author Topic: Stanislaus vs arrezzio  (Read 2358 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #60 on: July 18, 2014, 04:52:32 PM »
Someone give me a good reason why I might want to put oil in pizza sauce.

Ryan,

I can't give you any good reason that you might want to put oil in pizza sauce.  All I know is that it works out okay for the pizzas I offer at market.  I used November's MAE method of combining oil, crushed garlic and other seasonings in the Stanislaus product I use.  I never had any sauce and oil separations. 

I am not saying the sauce I use is the best pizza sauce.  I have tried many brands of tomato products for pizza sauces that I do like.

Norma

« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 05:33:43 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #61 on: July 18, 2014, 04:58:59 PM »
i like the oil add in those lil marinara cups you get when you buy a calzone.  and yes, it does separate.
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Offline gabaghool

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #62 on: July 21, 2014, 01:05:38 PM »
i didn't realize the NY sauce had no oil in the sauce.  But, really, I can't understand why a drizzle of EVOO isn't a must for pizza sauce, pre or post baked.  To me, all tomato sauces could use EVOO (only, not pumice, not pure, etc)  In fact, I can't remember one dish not utilizing some kind of fat in it...evoo or pork fat.  I think its as important as basil as something to use with tomatoes. Just my opinion.

One thing about oregano...I think if you use oregano, it should be added to every individual pizza, as you make it.  That way, oregano flavor is not in every single bite.  Batali is a big proponent when WHEN ingrediants get added....like if you add crushed red pepper in the beginning of the cooking process, you get an overall bite, put it in at the last minute, each bite is a bit different.....I like that idea.   I've noticed that adding oregano to the sauce bucket makes it real, real strong....and also, don't know if its true or not, but the sauce seems to go off quicker.....

Big stanislaus fan (valoroso) and big extra virgin fan.........

Offline jsaras

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #63 on: July 21, 2014, 06:16:14 PM »
I, like Norma, use microwave spice extraction for my sauce.  I tried using water as the "solvent", but I found that oil worked better.  I use 1-1.5 TBS of oil in a 28 ounce can.  That puts it in the 3.5% range.  Most people make the remark about how my pizza isn't greasy, so maybe I'm not doing it right ;-D
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #64 on: July 21, 2014, 07:05:45 PM »
I, like Norma, use microwave spice extraction for my sauce.  I tried using water as the "solvent", but I found that oil worked better.  I use 1-1.5 TBS of oil in a 28 ounce can.  That puts it in the 3.5% range.  Most people make the remark about how my pizza isn't greasy, so maybe I'm not doing it right ;-D

Some of the flavors are only fat soluble, so water extraction would not work as well. You will get the water soluble flavors when the oil+spices is added to the sauce.
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scott123

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #65 on: July 21, 2014, 08:50:25 PM »
i didn't realize the NY sauce had no oil in the sauce.  But, really, I can't understand why a drizzle of EVOO isn't a must for pizza sauce, pre or post baked.  To me, all tomato sauces could use EVOO (only, not pumice, not pure, etc)  In fact, I can't remember one dish not utilizing some kind of fat in it...evoo or pork fat.  I think its as important as basil as something to use with tomatoes. Just my opinion.

Nick, beyond the impact of the coal ovens, imo, you're looking at the greatest fundamental difference between New Haven and NY style pizza.  When I first started researching New Haven pizza, I was in shock by how frequently oil was drizzled on the pie pre-bake. The coal places in NY add oil, but, when you get into archetypal deck oven NY slices, you rarely find it.  They'll use vegetable oil in dough for it's baking properties, but you'll almost never find evoo on slices.

Fat is everything in food. Fresh mozz, unless it's bufala, gives off almost no fat.  So, when pizza first made it's way to America, and fior di latte was all that was available, fat supplementation was critical. Since these were Italian immigrants, it only makes sense that they'd reach for the oil of their homeland, evoo. If we were having this conversation 100 years ago, then I'd wholeheartedly defend evoo in NY style pizza.  But the melting pot kicked in and pizza evolved.  20th century aged motz, on a thin crust pie, gave off more than enough fat to please the taste buds, and notoriously cheap, margin watching pizzeria owners jumped at the chance to save a dime or two by omitting the evoo.

Was the result of this frugality a good thing? For people that love the taste of evoo, no.  But the phenomenon happened, with sufficient market penetration to define the style.  When you add evoo to NY style pizza, it changes the nature dramatically.  It no longer tastes like NY style pizza. It's something else.  For some, it might be better, but, for the city that defined it, for the millions that worship at it's altar, evoo is outside the canon.

Some people like evoo.  Some like provolone.  Others love sourdough.  That's good for them.  But none of these have any place in authentic NY style pizza.

When you say 'pizza has to have evoo' you're saying, 'I prefer NH to NY style pizza.' There's nothing wrong with that.  Before you completely pass judgement, though, I would ask you to eventually try my NY style pie and see if you miss it  >:D 
« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 09:09:33 PM by scott123 »

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Stanislaus vs arrezzio
« Reply #66 on: July 27, 2014, 12:03:05 PM »
nice pie!!

that crust makes me yearn for old skool PH thin.   :'(

it was a 50% hydration cornmeal/flour crust. it was in between a dry pita and a hard taco in crunch. still chew, still crunch. turned out great
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