Author Topic: Wild yeast & sourdough  (Read 238 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline reeter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 98
  • Location: Seattle
  • I Love Pizza!
Wild yeast & sourdough
« on: July 22, 2014, 03:23:12 PM »
 ???
I have been told that buying a specific sourdough starter or culture is useless because they always blend with your own wild yeast in your home area.  It sounds logical, can anyone enlighten me as to why it wouldn't mix?   I know anyone can make their own starter from scratch with the local wild yeast?

reeter


Offline JD

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1258
  • Location: NE Mississippi, but NY born & raised
Re: Wild yeast & sourdough
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 03:31:51 PM »
Josh

Online Donjo911

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 936
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Wild yeast & sourdough
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 03:40:26 PM »

 ^^^ JD - you beat me to it! I could not remember the other guy (and I was spelling his handle "asporica" incorrectly) in the advanced search!
This is conversation was fantastic. Deep, heady and provocative - and caused me to have to look up 100 words I did not know and visit websites I never heard of.
Classic!
I have done wrong.. but what I did, I thought needed to be done.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12848
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Wild yeast & sourdough
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2014, 04:21:20 PM »
???
I have been told that buying a specific sourdough starter or culture is useless because they always blend with your own wild yeast in your home area.  It sounds logical, can anyone enlighten me as to why it wouldn't mix?   I know anyone can make their own starter from scratch with the local wild yeast?

I would suggest letting this sleeping dog lie undisturbed.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline reeter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 98
  • Location: Seattle
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Wild yeast & sourdough
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2014, 05:35:57 PM »
Thanks, interesting read.

Sorry, I didn't mean to dredge up a sore spot, for anyone.  We'll call it good and done, like a good pie   ;D
reeter

Offline xty

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 26
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Wild yeast & sourdough
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2014, 09:58:10 PM »
After 2 years, my Alaskan starter still rises twice as fast as my local from-scratch one, and my one from Italy still tastes different than my local one.