Author Topic: wet sauce  (Read 1886 times)

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Offline rayguy

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wet sauce
« on: July 09, 2006, 11:47:37 AM »
What is wet sauce? Is this the type of sauce that if you tip the pizza to one side slightly, the pizza will slide away from the crust? How is wet sauce created? Is this a sauce with too much water in it?

rayguy


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: wet sauce
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2006, 12:36:37 PM »
rayguy,

It's not a term of art that I am familiar with in the context of a pizza sauce, but I would say that it is a thin sauce, or possibly one with too much water that you can get puddling in the middle of the pizza.

A thin pizza sauce is sometimes intentional, as I discovered some time ago when I was reading about a pizza sauce used by a professional pizza operator on NY style pizzas. Note, for example, the reference to the thin sauce, and the reasons behind it, in the following:

Remember when it comes to sauce and dry spices... less spice is better. Many people have tried to duplicate NY Style pizza sauce.. they even dumpster dive for secrets and there are non. They always over-spice their sauce. Take 2 cups of Full Red pizza sauce and add a cup of water to it (maybe a bit more). This is a thin sauce for the same reason the dough is a moist dough.. the high heat will boil the water out of the sauce.. too thick of a sauce and you will have tomato paste under your toppings and it will be sickeningly pasty on the edges. Add 1/2 tsp of oregano, 1/2 tsp of basil, 1/4 tsp ground black pepper and 1/4 tsp of crushed red pepper, 1/2 tsp salt, maybe 1/2 tsp of sugar if you think it has too much of an acid bite to it and finally 1 tbs of the fresh grated romano cheese. Stir and let set an hour or better yet overnight.

Some operators go in the opposite direction and use thick sauces, especially if they do a lot of pre-saucing of their skins in advance of actual orders. A thick sauce is also often used for take-and-bake pizzas, where, as in the previous example, you don't want the sauce to migrate down into the dough because it sits around too long before being baked.

BTW, a common test to tell whether a pizza sauce is too thin (or "wet") is to put a few tablespoons on a plate and let it set for about 15 minutes. If too much water separates from the solids, that would usually not be considered a quality pizza sauce.

Peter


Offline abc

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Re: wet sauce
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2006, 01:16:13 PM »

BTW, a common test to tell whether a pizza sauce is too thin (or "wet") is to put a few tablespoons on a plate and let it set for about 15 minutes. If too much water separates from the solids, that would usually not be considered a quality pizza sauce.

Peter



you know Pete, when i open a can of those BIG commerical plum tomatoes and pulse them down to sauce (after scooping the tomatoes from the puree and individually popping each tomato to release some of its water, and mostly dumping this collection of liquid away)...  I add back to this tomato flesh collection, a bit of the lovely red puree from the can.  i notice that after seasoning, i can spoon out water that settles itself out.  when leaving the sauce overnight, it settles again.  either i work with continually thicked sauce by remoting the water each time it collects, or i stir it back in... i'm thinking i didn't release enough water from the tomatoes in the beginning... maybe i should strain them for half an hr before pulsing them.

those ready made 'red sauce' some pizza operators use are really red, really zesty, and quite thick. 

i started to think either i put all of my puree, which like i mention I add some of it back to the tomatoes... i can't add all because i feel it makes my sauce too thin.... i started to think maybe I should put all the puree on a stove and reduce it to thicken it up, then combine it w/ the pulsed tomatoes... but i've been trying to get by with a noncooked sauce, so this doesn't help.


so i'm stuck thinking either i buy readymade cans of red sauce (which i don't currently have a source for), or my yield from a commercial size (Nina brand) which i pay about 2.89 / can of tomatoes is rather small...   and then i'd hate to consider the yield from a 28.oz can, then.



« Last Edit: July 09, 2006, 01:58:34 PM by abc »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: wet sauce
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2006, 01:52:12 PM »
abc,

I think you have come to the correct conclusion. The test I mentioned is one that is recommended for finished sauces, such as one might buy already made, for example.

For most of my pizzas I use the 6-in-1s or their equivalents. They are already quite thick and need no cooking or anything like that. However, when I use whole canned tomatoes, like the San Marzanos (but excepting the La Reginas), there is a lot of liquid left once I squeeze the liquids and seeds from the tomatoes themselves. I usually add the liquids from the tomatoes to the liquids in the can and heat them slowly on low heat until most of the liquid is driven off. I sometimes add the final "sauce" to the tomatoes or set it aside to use another time. I know that some people throw away the can liquids but I haven't quite gotten to the point of being able to do that. I have found that when I add herbs and spices the sauce actually tastes quite good, and not tinny.

Not too long ago, I decided to puree a full #10 can of San Marzanos in a food mill. It seemed that just about all the tomatoes went into the bowl, with just a small amount of fruit in relation to what was in the bowl. It occurred to me that maybe I should have used a different disk but by that time it was too late. I reduced the liquids and made a sauce out of them, along with herbs and spices, etc. But it took forever to reduce the liquids to a usable form.

Peter

Offline abc

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Re: wet sauce
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2006, 08:35:33 PM »
today i made another big can of sauce...  this time i did a very religious job of releasing the rather clear water from the tomatoes... i then pulsed them, added olive oil and rough chopped garlic and actually added all the thick puree from the nina can.  i threw away all the thin watery stuff from all the individual tomatoes.

Offline Lydia

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Re: wet sauce
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2006, 02:08:04 PM »
"Wet sauce" is a term used for sauces with higher ratio water to tomato solids (specific gravity). A standard canned tomato sauce would be considered a wet sauce whereas a tomato paste diluted with equal volume of liquid would not.  A wet sauce will have a the tendency to run when poured on a flat surface.

Beyond this, I don't have anymore specifics.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


 

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