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Offline AnonymousPizza

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Anonymous Journal
« on: August 12, 2014, 03:17:19 AM »
So this'll be it. Instead of spreading my pizzas throughout the threads of the forum, I'll keep them here. No one likes too many pizzas out on the loose, okay.

I started making pizzas a couple weeks ago. I'm in college so I started making my own food from scratch. Anyway, I finally registered on the forums a couple days ago.

Making a first entry now. The last pizza I made was about my tenth ever. So I'll call this pizza eleven.

Pizza 11:

DOUGH

I used store-bought dough, so if you love fresh dough...sorry.

First time I've tried Trader Joe's dough; it's cheaper than Safeway's, and has less ingredients, none of them weird (like Safeway's addition of calcium sulfate dihydrate and ascorbic acid). And, to be honest, Safeway's dough always has a weird feel to it...like its gluten is on psychedelics or something. It just acts a little strange. This dough felt much nicer.

For anyone that cares:

Trader Joe's Plain Pizza Dough ingredients: enriched unbleached flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, olive and canolia oil blend, sea salt, yeast.

Safeway Select Traditional Pizza Dough ingredients: enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, yeast, salt, sugar, calcium sulfate dihydrate, ascorbic acid.

I don't know why they spell thiamine mononitrate differently either.

I ripped off 9 oz of dough. I was going for 8, so not bad. That stretched to a decently thin 9.5-10" pizza.

SAUCE, CHEESE, TOPPINGS

I wrote a lot more for this part and then pressed refresh on accident. Because I really am that lazy, this section is going to be short now.

I used Lucerne's "fresh" whole milk mozzarella, which I shredded two days ago. The cheese went on first; this is the second time I've done that, so we'll see how it works. Then I made a failed attempt at swirling the sauce over the cheese. It was plain Contandina tomato sauce. Then, I placed the toppings underneath the crust. Oh, no, nevermind, toppings go on top. This is not a reverse pizza I'm making here. So, some cheap pepperoni and a bit of Belgioioso fresh mozzarella went on top.

THE BAKE

I've been baking my pizzas on a slab of sandstone in the BBQ. This one had to go in on its metal baking sheet, placed on top of the stone - it got stuck to it, and I couldn't get it off without throwing it out the window. I've noticed pizzas can turn out fine like this, though. They don't burn to a crisp because the stone keeps off some of the convection and radiant heat.

The propane literally just ran out as I was going to put the pizza in. I bought more. Temp's up to 525F. Okay, this thing's going in.

(9 minutes of baking later...)

RESULTS

This is nice.

It actually tastes like a real pizza I'd buy...I don't think I can say that for any pizza I've made myself, until now. I think...just maybe...that this dough is amazing. It was like Trader Joe's made it for NY pizza. Or Trader Joe himself did. Has anyone met him?

The crust is burnt around the edges; this always happens, I assume because I'm leaving the pizzas in for too long for how much my cooking sufaces conduct, but the sauce and cheese keep the center from burning up too bad. I like my toppings cooked, though. Not like a little char ever gives anyone cancer....right?

I said my last pizza could fold, but like a dying leaf. This one folds like republicans in a poker match. In other words, great - I'll post pics. Again, I thank Trader Joe's for this. If I don't make my own dough, I'm going back there. No more Safeway doughs, starting now.

I didn't season this pizza whatsoever. It was plain mozzarella, tomato sauce, and dough. I carefully chose to make this pizza completely plain because...I forgot to season the pizza before I finished it.

The flavor is great though. Maybe the seasonings I usually use just intrude on the pizza flavor; it really seems that way. This tastes flavorful, bright, fruity, and fresh. Hardly any bitterness, and the mozzarella has a pretty good level of complexity.

I'll call this the best pizza I've made so far.

Let's hope that some day, I'll look back at this and laugh, because of how bad it looks in comparison to what I can do. But yeah I dunno really okay bye.

Pic 1: The plain TJ's dough.
2: Other TJ's doughs.
3: You get to see my pizza tossing skills.
4: Cheese first.
5: Could you tell it was a spiral if I didn't say first?
6: Pizza, finished.
7: What it looked like after an hour of sitting (when I was getting propane).
8: Pizza, really finished.
9: Sliced pizza, not going to last long now.
10: Crust shot.
11: Another crust shot. Folds good, but weak center.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 07:28:58 AM by AnonymousPizza »
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Offline AnonymousPizza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2014, 03:25:33 AM »
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 07:27:48 AM by AnonymousPizza »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2014, 10:47:01 AM »
Trader Joe's Plain Pizza Dough ingredients: enriched unbleached flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, olive and canolia oil blend, sea salt, yeast.

Safeway Select Traditional Pizza Dough ingredients: enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, yeast, salt, sugar, calcium sulfate dihydrate, ascorbic acid.
AnonymousPizza,

That is a very nice writeup.

You are correct that, as between the Trader Joe's dough and the Safeway dough, the Trader Joe dough is perhaps the better choice. For one thing, from the placement of the yeast at the end of the ingredients list it appears that the Trader Joe's dough is perhaps delivered to their stores fresh, not frozen. My recollection is that TJ relies on local producers for their pizza dough, not a centralized source. By contrast, the placement of the yeast in the ingredients list for the Safeway dough suggests that their dough is delivered to their stores frozen. Most likely it is from a regional centralized source.

I wouldn't worry about the calcium sulfate didhydrate and the ascorbic acid. Calcium sulfate dehydrate is more commonly known as gypsum, but it is a common dough conditioner. As such, it acts as a firming agent and a buffer to strengthen the dough to keep it from getting sticky. It also is a source of calcium and it helps regulate the pH of the dough. The ascorbic acid is simply Vitamin C. It is a common ingredient that is used in flours as a substitute for potassium bromate and azodicarbonamide, which many companies, including the big pizza chains, avoid using in their doughs.

Another distinction between the two doughs is the use of sugar in the Safeway dough. There isn't a great deal of it in the dough but it should add a bit of tenderness to the finished crust and it should also serve to feed the yeast if the dough is held in the refrigerator for, say, a day or two. The sugar might also contribute to final crust coloration if it is part of the residual sugar in the dough at the time of baking. I wouldn't try to keep the Safeway dough for long once it has been defrosted. Often the dough is already defrosted when you buy it because the dough is not kept in the frozen storage sections of the supermarket.

I also note that the Safeway dough does not contain any oil. Oil in dough helps to make the dough more extensible and easier to handle and, if used in sufficient quantity, it can add a bit of flavor to the finished crust and maybe a bit more color.

Several years ago, another member and I took a stab at reverse engineering and cloning a West coast version of a TJ dough. You might find the thread devoted to that effort of interest. It is at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2036.msg17940#msg17940.

If you have a chance sometime, would you mind giving me the nutrient values stated on the label called Nutrition Facts?

BTW, here's the story on Trader Joe: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Coulombe

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2014, 11:47:58 AM »
You did good A......many here have used the TJ doughs.

Is the 525 temp reading from the grill thermometer{I suspect} or do you have an IR gun?

Hard to tell from the one pic of your baking rock....is the rock a bit bowl shaped? If so, that is probably the culprit of your bottom crust outer edge burning situation.   You.ll need to preheat the stone longer to get the thicker middle part of the rock more heat saturated. You also may need a lower bake temp.

If you`d like you can start the pizza out on a screen and snatch the screen out after a few minutes, works great....have fun!   :chef:
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 11:50:13 AM by Chicago Bob »
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scott123

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2014, 02:21:53 PM »
AnonymousPizza, a few thoughts.

First, store bought dough will always be a crap shoot.  This time, you got lucky and ended up with a well fermented dough.  Next time, you might not be as lucky.

Did you re-ball the dough?  It depends on the dough, but, generally speaking, it's not a great idea to re-ball dough close to stretching, as it can make stretching difficult.

Speaking of stretching... you need to edge stretch. If you don't, you end with a bowl shape to the skin.  The bowl shape causes the toppings to migrate towards the center as the pizza bakes, as you're seeing here. This includes the water released by the fresh mozzarella- which made for a soupier center. Fresh mozzarella, because of it's lack of stability, the water it releases and it's lack of flavor, has no place on NY style, imo, but if you absolutely feel compelled to use it, make sure you're working with a flat skin by incorporating edge stretching.

Another aspect that exacerbated the soupiness in the center is your bake setup. First, sandstone has no place in an oven, as it possesses very little resistance to thermal shock and could crack- possibly even violently. Lose it.

Second, bricks are heat sponges. If you have them in the grill while your stone is pre-heating, they rob the stone of heat, and, depending on where they're placed, they can cause the stone to preheat unevenly as well.  With your grill setup, it appears that you insulated the core of your baking area and produced a temp differential between outside and the center. In other words, your stone is heating extremely unevenly.

If you're going to work with a grill- and a grill is the absolutely hardest scenario to get fast even Essen-ish bakes from, then you're going to, at a bare minimum, need a stone.  Unglazed quarry tiles, if you protect them from direct heat with a deflector (foil should work) will work nicely, but... unglazed quarry tiles can be incredibly difficult to find. Quarry tiles can be the cheapest option, but if you want to keep making pies, you really can't wait to track them down.  You can order a kiln shelf online, but that's not quite as ideal as kiln shelves because of it's greater conductivity.  They aren't cheap, but fibraments work pretty well in the grill. Fibraments typically do not work well in the oven, though, so, when it comes time to bake indoors, you'll have to invest in another stone.  Mike (Essen) has a freakishly hot oven that went to around 610 F. which allows him to get fast bakes from a kiln shelf.  The odds are pretty low that you'll have as hot as an oven. Still, though, if you're a typical, strapped for cash college student, a kiln shelf might, to an extent work for both indoors and out.  It's ideal for neither, but it's enough of a middle ground that it makes a good compromise.

A massive aspect of Mike's success is his ability to make 18" pizzas, which, for NY are so much better than smaller pies.  If you do go with a kiln shelf, get the largest shelf that both your grill and your oven can accommodate.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2014, 05:39:40 PM »
Having bought and received an 18" x 18" x 1" kiln shelf recently, I'm inclined to say go with the biggest one your oven can handle and don't worry about whether it fits in the grill. Having baked many dozens (if not hundreds) of pizzas in grills, I feel like the oven comes first, especially if you have a good oven. I would not be able to fit my kiln shelf inside my grill, but I can easily fit my 15.75" round baking stone in the grill. And there is no way I'd want to lug the heavy kiln shelf back and forth between the oven and grill.

I haven't had a chance to use the kiln shelf enough to really be able to say much about it. All I can really say so far is: 1) It works; and 2) I can now bake 18" pizzas at home.

Due to the kiln shelf's thickness, it doesn't seem capable of getting quite as hot as the stone I used to keep in my oven, which is half as thick. However, I assume the thickness of the kiln shelf also keeps the heat coming to pizza(s), whereas my other stones lose much of their built-up heat before the first pizza is done baking. The kiln shelf has gotten at least as hot as 590, but the smaller stone got to at least 625, or maybe even 635. There is more than twice as much thermal mass in that kiln shelf as there is with any other stone I've used at home, so I have a lot to learn about how it works.

I feel good about the kiln shelf, though. Especially since it gives me the ability to bake 18" NY style pizzas. And the fact that it's square means 18" pizzas are actually doable. Because if the pizza ends up hanging off one side of the kiln shelf after peeling, by half an inch or an inch, all I have to do is wait maybe 30 seconds and rotate it 45 degrees (because the corner-to-corner dimensions are much larger than 18").

Offline AnonymousPizza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2014, 12:12:49 AM »
First of all, these replies are amazing.

I joined this forum mostly for Essen's dough posts. But Peter, your Papa John's clone thread was probably my first time finding this site. I saw it and just thought 'ok, I need to try this.' Back when I was just googling around for recipes.

Scott, Ryan, Bob, I see your posts all the time and pretty much have learned everything about pizza from you, and some others, here.

Now that we know we all love each other, I've made a few pizzas and sometimes feel lazy about posting. I'll try to get them all in here now.

Pizza 12: Essen's 2nd Recipe

DOUGH

Ugh, this was so many days ago I forgot a lot. I think I used Essen's Stone-Buhr recipe, in his OP, here, which is this:
  • Flour (100%)
  • Water (63%)
  • Sea salt (3%)
  • Olive oil (2%)
  • IDY (0.5%)
  • Sugar (0.5%)
but I used King Arthur BF anyway.

My second pizza using my own dough.

Mixed in a bread mixer, cold fermented in the fridge for 3 to 4 days. I wish I remembered which - either way, it's a while.

I don't remember which suggestions I took and which I didn't. Honestly, I just want to get to my latest pizza.

SAUCE, CHEESE, BAKE

Lucerne low-moisture part-skim mozzarella, went on first. Cento San Marzano tomatoes were crushed by hand and went on next - this is the highlight of the toppings. I don't know what you all think of Cento, but this was my first time with San Marzano sauce, and yes, it makes a difference. Acidy! Fresh Belgioioso mozz on the top, still. But I'm pondering its place on an NY slice.

This was again baked on a cookie sheet, sitting on top of the sandstone in the BBQ. The grill thermometer read 500F, but always drops 50F or so when pizza goes in. As I'm writing this, I can feel good that I already got rid of that sandstone.

RESULTS

The crust had good flavor but was probably too thick and underbaked so it was floppy. Just look at the pictures if you really care about this pizza. I still just want to write about the pizza I'm eating right now.

Pic 1: Dough out of the fridge. Is it bubbly or is it just me?
Pic 2: Nope, it's definitely bubbly.
Pic 3: Perfectly round as I turn it out onto the counter...
Pic 4: San Marzano tomatoes, after the cheese.
Pic 5: Done.
Pic 6: Floury crust. I still needed cornmeal.
Pic 7: So...you all call this the money shot?
Pic 8: Me torturing pizza to see how it bends.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 12:54:10 AM by AnonymousPizza »
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Offline Donjo911

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2014, 12:18:49 AM »
It looks like your dough was overblown/over fermented.  That has happened to me before.  You may want to refer to the IDY/ADY prediction table and check your %'s of yeast and time/temp.  It's also possible your dough was too warm on your bench prior to opening up.
Cheers,
Don
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2014, 04:27:02 PM »
It looks like your dough was overblown/over fermented.

I'm inclined to agree, but your crust still looks nice. To get that much top color on a grill is very unusual, even with dough that isn't overfermented. So maybe it's not overfermented.

Oh, OK, I see that you baked on a cookie sheet. That surely contributed to the top browning, as the heat barrier (cookie sheet) allows for a longer bake. Most people wouldn't know how to bake in a grill directly on stone. (To be fair, it's very hard to do that, and there are a few tricks one must learn before being able to bake directly on stone in a grill without ending up with a black bottom and undercooked top.) Is the black thing the cookie sheet?

Offline AnonymousPizza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2014, 07:21:35 PM »
Donjo, yeah. I remember accidentally doubling the ADY.

I did a couple other pizzas before the one I'm posting now, but they were with store bought dough. So I'm not counting them.

This one's my 3rd time making dough.

Pizza 13: Essen's Latest Recipe

DOUGH

So I went with Mike's latest recipe this time, here. Adjusted ADY to 0.2% like he did most recently, to get this:
  • Flour (100%):    449.56 g  |  15.86 oz | 0.99 lbs
  • Water (63%):    283.22 g  |  9.99 oz | 0.62 lbs
  • ADY (0.2%):    0.9 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.24 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
  • Salt (1.8%):    8.09 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.69 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
  • Oil (2%):    8.99 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2 tsp | 0.67 tbs
  • Sugar (2%):    8.99 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.26 tsp | 0.75 tbsp
  • Total (169%):   759.75 g | 26.8 oz | 1.67 lbs | TF = 0.0758258
  • Single Ball:   379.88 g | 13.4 oz | 0.84 lbs
I did 70/30 with KA Bread Flour and KA All Purpose Flour, so, with the way I measured it out:
  • KABF: 11.1 oz
  • KA AP Flour: 4.75 oz
  • H2O: 10 oz
  • ADY: .32 t
  • Sugar: 2.16 t
  • Morton Kosher Salt: 1.69 t
  • Oil: 1.97 t
Mixed in a bread machine. What I've been doing is weighing out the water, then pouring all but 1/4 cup into the machine. Then I microwave the 1/4 cup until warm, dissolve the ADY in it, and add it to the machine, followed by the flour and other ingredients.

So I did that, and stopped the machine after around 4 minutes of mixing. Then I realized I completely left out the oil.

I didn't want to mix it anymore. So, yeah, this ended up being oilless dough. If you were wondering why oil was crossed out, well, yeah.

In the fridge for 22ish hours. Then divided into two balls, and back in the fridge. After 55ish hours, total, I was finally allowed to start making pizza.

I took a lot of Scott's suggestions. I tried not to reball the dough at all, and edge stretched thoroughly, until it was about 13.5 inches. I also finally bought cornmeal, which helped. Then, sauce and cheese.

SAUCE, CHEESE, TOPPINGS

The sauce went on first this time, like a normal person would do it. Then TJ's whole milk low-moisture mozzarella went on, which is what Essen uses sometimes. Then Hormel pepperoni, which I really just think of as Safeway pepperoni. No seasonings - that's it.

THE BAKE

I found quarry tiles! Floor and Decor. A local tile place seemed friendly enough to help me look for them, then blew me off. So don't blame me for going corporate.

550F is about what my grill's thermometer showed, after a preheat of around half an hour. This temp always drops gradually about 25-50F after the pizza goes in, as it sucks up some of the heat.

Ryan, yeah, that black thing was the cookie sheet. But I got rid of it happily, since I can actually fit a pizza on the bare tiles. I've had problems with burnt bottoms a lot, either way. I mess with keeping different burners on and off after the pizza goes in, but I have no idea if it makes a difference. And you're definitely right about the bake time difference.

So, no sheet. The pizza was only in there for 3 minutes. I smelled burning at that point, opened the lid, and found a pizza that basically looked done. It got stuck, hard, too. It sat on the tiles with the heat off for another minute as I scraped it off.

RESULTS

See, there's a nice thing about being so new to pizzamaking, like me. Literally, almost every pizza I make, I can look at it and taste it and say, 'this is the best pizza I've ever made.'

But, past that, the crust was burnt pretty badly. I mean, it was only in there for 3 to 4 minutes...how was I supposed to know? Still, flavor was good. I don't mind char. The toppings, as simple as they were, blended well, even though they were a little bland and one-dimensional. Sprinkling on sugar and oregano helped; I really should season my pizzas next time.

The crust, only compared to the other two crusts I've ever made the dough for, was the best so far. I could eat it by itself and it wouldn't be boring. It was sturdy enough to hold up well, but it was burnt, so I really can't say it wasn't too crispy. Also, I noticed that it had some breadiness to it. Next time I might mix the dough for less than 4 minutes, and I might try more AP flour and less bread flour. This part wasn't too bad at all, though. If I wasn't looking for it, I don't know if I'd notice. I really feel like if I hadn't burnt this thing, and maybe I had preheated the grill longer, the crust could be, in some way, recognizable as a crisp, foldable, even Essenish NY slice.

One thing - I'd rather get more lift from the dough. Essen says Red Star yeast is better; I use Fleischmann's. I think longer or warmer fermentation would help too. Anyone know about this?

Also, Peter, here are the nutrition facts you asked for. But, you know, you can find this kind of information on almost anything you can think of, through google. Actually I'll just link to one of the sites that came up. They include nutrition facts and ingredients. Seems better than what I can do. *Link.*

So...yeah.

Pic 1: Why is everything about fresh dough so amazing?
Pic 2: Done, before the fridging.
Pic 3: After 22 hours of fridging.
Pic 4: After 55 hours of fridging (and divided).
Pic 5: Pretty bubbly in here, isn't it.
Pic 6: Being a normal person, and putting the sauce on first.
Pic 7: Pepperonis in a hexagon, and baking.
Pic 8: This is a finished pizza.
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Offline AnonymousPizza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2014, 07:25:14 PM »

Pic 9: This is a finished, sliced pizza.
Pic 10: Crumb.
Pic 11: More crumb.
Pic 12: Holy burnt crust, Batman!
Pic 13: Yeah, this pizza had an imprint of a quarry tile in its back. Uneven tiles.
Pic 14: It's hard to hold these slices for so long without eating them.
Pic 15: But I deal with it.
Pic 16: A nice picture of the crust.
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Offline AnonymousPizza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2014, 07:26:02 PM »
Pic 17: A weird last crumb shot. I guess I'll leave this in here.
Pic 18: I like to put my own pizza in some random pizzeria's pizza box. It just looks better in there, for some reason.
Pic 19: ESSEN'S PIZZA - not mine. This is the picture that inspired this all.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2014, 07:28:49 PM by AnonymousPizza »
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2014, 07:46:59 PM »
Pic 9: This is a finished, sliced pizza.
Pic 10: Crumb.
Pic 11: More crumb.
Pic 12: Holy burnt crust, Batman!
Pic 13: Yeah, this pizza had an imprint of a quarry tile in its back. Uneven tiles.
Pic 14: It's hard to hold these slices for so long without eating them.
Pic 15: But I deal with it.
Pic 16: A nice picture of the crust.
There is a lot to like on the top side of that pizza A....good work, you are getting close now.  :chef:
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Offline Donjo911

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2014, 07:53:49 PM »
There is a lot to like on the top side of that pizza A....good work, you are getting close now.  :chef:
It's cool to see your process and how your tasty experiments turn out! Good work on a dough with that much time in!  It'll be fun to see your next experiments too. I know you're working on a grill. We don't know where you live but hopefully, you'll be able to continue as the fall/winter comes.
Cheers,
Don
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2014, 07:58:39 PM »
550F is about what my grill's thermometer showed, after a preheat of around half an hour. This temp always drops gradually about 25-50F after the pizza goes in, as it sucks up some of the heat.

When your grill lid's thermometer reads 550, it probably means your stone is more like 750. That's hot. That's why you get that nearly-black bottom.

OK, so here are some tricks that will help you keep that from happening:
  • Put aluminum foil or an aluminum pan under the stone(s). This reflects the intense bottom heat instead of allowing the stone(s) to absorb all of it. The stone(s) will still get very hot.
  • Launch the pizza as fast as possible, then shut the lid as fast as possible, and leave it shut for at least 3 minutes.
I think there is at least one more thing I wanted to add to that list, but my brain took the day off. This may not work with all grills, but it worked well with the grill I used to use.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2014, 08:15:26 PM »
When your grill lid's thermometer reads 550, it probably means your stone is more like 750. That's hot. That's why you get that nearly-black bottom.

OK, so here are some tricks that will help you keep that from happening:
  • Put aluminum foil or an aluminum pan under the stone(s). This reflects the intense bottom heat instead of allowing the stone(s) to absorb all of it. The stone(s) will still get very hot.
  • Launch the pizza as fast as possible, then shut the lid as fast as possible, and leave it shut for at least 3 minutes.

I think there is at least one more thing I wanted to add to that list,
but my brain took the day off. This may not work with all grills, but it worked well with the grill I used to use.
Get an IR gun?
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2014, 08:25:07 PM »
Yeah, that too. But that's not what I meant to add.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Anonymous Journal
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2014, 08:21:04 AM »
Quote
Also, Peter, here are the nutrition facts you asked for. But, you know, you can find this kind of information on almost anything you can think of, through google. Actually I'll just link to one of the sites that came up. They include nutrition facts and ingredients. Seems better than what I can do. *Link.*
Anonymous,

Thank you for the link. However, it is the Nutrition Facts for the TJ dough that I would be interested in seeing, not for the Safeway dough. There is a Safeway affiliate near me and I have seen the Nutrition Facts for their dough. And I have concluded that the dough is shipped frozen to their stores. By contrast, as best I can tell, the PJ dough is a fresh dough that is made locally and delivered to TJ stores, and, as a result, the different TJ stores around the country can have different doughs. This is not one of those cases where Google will be of much help. You might find nutrition-oriented websites purporting to specify the nutritional information for various products, including those of TJ, but often that information is different that of the originating source and can be incomplete and even in error.

It's no problem if you cannot provide the TJ Nutrition Facts. I was only interested in seeing what is in their dough and maybe the approximate quantities. Fresh and frozen doughs are much easier to analyze than baked pizzas, even the most basic ones.

Peter