Author Topic: Roman Pizza  (Read 1981 times)

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Offline ebpizza

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Roman Pizza
« on: August 05, 2006, 08:30:16 PM »
I'm looking for a recipe for Roman pizza that I can cook at home. I've been to Naples and Rome and have both pizzas. Looking to recreate the roman version at home. Similar to the one in the photo

http://www.ristorantidiroma.com/baffetto2/cucina.htm


Offline scott r

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Re: Roman Pizza
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2006, 08:34:44 PM »
I was expecting to see the square pan cooked pizza.  Could you describe the differences between the style you are interested in and a Neapolitan pizza?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Roman Pizza
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2006, 09:04:54 PM »
In his book, American Pie, Peter Reinhart has a Roman Pizza Dough recipe starting at page 110. I don't know whether it is an authentic recipe, but according to Reinhart "Everything about the pizza is essentially the same as for the Napoletana, except that the dough is stretched much thinner to form an almost crackerlike crust." He adds some semolina flour to the Napoletana dough recipe to make it stiffer, and thus easier to stretch thinly, and to give it some extra crispness in the oven.

Peter

Offline musiq

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Re: Roman Pizza
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2006, 07:57:20 AM »
Scott, the reason you were expecting to see a square pan pizza is because Rome is known to produce the best "pizza in  teglia" , so when you speak of roman pizza, you usually refer to that kind, as well as when you talk about neapolitan, you mean the round one, because that is what naples is famous for.
Anyway we romans have our own way of doing "normal" pizza too, and as Pete said, compared to the neapolitan, is thinner, crunchier, small rim , usually shaped with the rolling pin and cooked for longer at a lower temperature.
The dough probably uses a stronger flour than the neapolitan, lower hydration , slightly higher content of salt.
I'm sorry but i wouldn't be able to give any recipe, i've never tried this at home!

Offline scott r

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Re: Roman Pizza
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2006, 01:41:00 PM »
thats fine, from your description I can totally imagine what it would be liike.  THANKS

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Roman Pizza
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2006, 02:51:21 PM »
maybe it's time for a road trip to Rome