Author Topic: Caputo Flour  (Read 4350 times)

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Offline ebpizza

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Caputo Flour
« on: August 11, 2006, 04:00:13 PM »
When members refer to using Caputo flour, which one are they talking about:

1 Blue "Pizzeria" bag or
2. Blue "Farino 00" bag


http://www.molinocaputo.it/




Online Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2006, 04:39:29 PM »
ebpizza,

Originally, the only Caputo flour that was available to the members of the forum was the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour. That is the one shown in at the Molino Caputo website in the bag with a picture of a pizza on it. Because that flour was the only Caputo 00 flour we were aware of initially, we simply referred to it as "Caputo" flour or "Caputo 00" flour.

Subsequently, another Caputo flour was introduced to the U.S. market, called Extra Blu. That is the flour shown at the Molino Caputo website in the blue bag with a picture of a wide variety of baked goods. The Caputo Extra Blu has lower protein content than the Caputo 00 Pizzeria. It can be used for broad baking applications, as suggested by the picture on the bag, but it can also be used to make pizza where the dough has a short fermentation time. To distinguish between this flour and the Pizzeria flour, many of us have started to refer to the flours by their full names.

There is also a third Caputo 00 flour that is available in the U.S. market, called Rinforzato Rosso. That's the one that is shown in the red bag at the Molino Caputo website. It has a higher protein content than the other two Caputo flours discussed above. It also can be used to make pizza dough, mainly those applications benefiting from quite long fermentation times. To the best of my knowledge, very few of our members use that flour. The Rinforzato Rosso is often simply called "Caputo Red".

Peter

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2006, 08:31:59 AM »
thanks so much for the clarification

Offline PizzaBrewer

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2006, 08:59:08 AM »
In addition, I believe they also import the one called "Confezioni".  I met the Caputo rep at the NY pizza show last year, and he sent me a bag which you see pictured on the left here:

http://www.molinocaputo.it/eng/confezioni.htm

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2006, 09:25:31 AM »
Guy,

You are correct. The three flours that I mentioned seem to be the ones most used by pizza makers. There is also a Caputo gnocchi pasta flour that is sold in the U.S.

For those who are interested, the Confezioni flour is sold by cuisineus.com. They are the only place I am aware of that also carries the Caputo Red in small, 1-kilo bags (they will also take orders for the large bag). Chefswarehouse.com carries the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour, the Caputo Extra Blu, the Caputo Red and the Caputo gnocchi flour, all in 25 kilo bags. I believe Forno Bravo is the most popular source for the Caputo Extra Blu. Unless things have changed, I believe that Penn Mac (pennmac.com) is still the only outfit to carry small bags (5 lbs.) of the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour, in repackaged form.

Peter

Offline PizzaBrewer

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2006, 07:12:04 PM »
Thanks for the confirmation.  I still maintain that Caputo's method of identifying (or rather not identifying) the different "00" flours is confusing at best.   Their website shows 6 different blue bags, only 2 of which (the gnocchi and pizzeria flours) have the name printed on the bag.

But then no one ever accused the Italians of being as organized and detail-oriented as, say, the Germans.   :D

---Guy
« Last Edit: August 12, 2006, 07:15:06 PM by PizzaBrewer »
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.

Offline raji

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2006, 02:38:06 AM »
I'm currently using the Caputo Extra Blu flour and am curious to see how much of a difference there will be between that and the Pizzeria 00 flour.  Can anyone comment on this?  I'm looking into buying a 55lb bag of the pizzeria 00.

Offline scott r

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2006, 01:45:47 PM »
also available over here is the pasta flour in the yellow bag.

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2006, 06:26:49 PM »
also available over here is the pasta flour in the yellow bag.

Do you mean the "00" supe giallo???

That is meant to be used for sourdough bread... It is slighter less strong then the Pizzeria

Offline Barry

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Re: Caputo Flour
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2006, 10:31:06 AM »
Hi Marco,

The only "00" flour that I can source in South Africa is FARINA "00" di grano tenero.  Lower on the pack it states "per pane, focacce, pizze, torte, dolci ..."

Is this suitable to try a Neopolitan style pizza ?

I use the Oregon Trail sourdough starter.

Kind regards.

Barry