Author Topic: Lehmann Dough Calculator  (Read 61897 times)

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Offline Aaron

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2006, 12:24:22 PM »
Just used the tool to make my first Lehmann dough ball,thanks for the great tool.
Aaron


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2006, 12:46:24 PM »
I might add that it is possible to add an occasional extra ingredient or two to the ingredients listed in the dough calculator (e.g., flour, water, yeast, etc.) without throwing off the balance of the final formulation that much. For example, if someone is making a single or a couple of dough balls and wants to add some honey, or nonfat dry milk, or dried dairy whey, or vital wheat gluten, adding small amounts of these ingredients won't upset the formulation that much because they don't weigh all that much in relation to the total. Technically, there should be a downward hydration adjustment for wet ingredients that include water, like honey (or barley malt syrup, or eggs), and an upward hydration adjustment for dry ingredients like vital wheat gluten (and especially vital wheat gluten). To that end, if one wishes, this can be done in the dough calculator by tweaking the hydration percent. Hopefully, the expanded version of the tool will handle extra ingredients in a more scientific manner.

BTW, the Kosher salt used in the dough calculator is based on the Morton brand of coarse Kosher salt. Since the recommended range of salt levels is fairly wide, using some other brand of salt won't upset the applecart. Most fine sea salts weigh about the same as ordinary table salt. Also, most oils, at least based on labelling information, weigh about the same. Sugars, whether ordinary table sugar, or raw sugar, or light brown/dark brown sugar, also weigh the same based on labelling information. Any differences between these ingredients within a class are so slight as to be negligible and, in any event, you wouldn't be able to differentiate between them at the volumes level using standard measuring spoons (which can also vary in accuracy from brand to brand), and maybe not even at the weights level using most digital scales. So, there is no need to be super sensitive about accuracy in these matters.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 18, 2006, 12:49:25 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline SemperFi

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2007, 04:36:22 PM »
What a Godsend this calculator is!!!  Boy, if this isn't worth $25 to become a supporting member, then I don't know what is.  Thank you for constructing this.
Adam

Offline Steve

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2007, 03:12:02 PM »
Wait 'till you see the new one!

As soon as I get time, I'll put it online.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2007, 03:48:14 PM »
And I haven't told Steve about the new Deep-Dish Dough Calculating Tool yet ;D.

Peter

Offline Art

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2007, 01:43:59 PM »
Why does the calculator warn "do not use extra virgin oil" and what type oil is recommended? I tried a search for this but came up empty. Thanks.  Art
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Offline chiguy

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2007, 03:17:40 PM »
 Art,
 Not sure but i believe EV olive oil is not recommended in a Lehmann pizza crust, especially with deck ovens because of its low smoking temperature.
 Not exactly sure if this is the reason? I can say i have used EV olive oil up to about 3% without any noticeable problems in the finished crust.  Chiguy
« Last Edit: January 17, 2007, 03:20:32 PM by chiguy »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2007, 03:23:32 PM »
Art,

The wording was intended to be more of a recommendation than a “pain of death” kind of warning. The Lehmann NY style dough formulation is a commercial recipe and, as noted here, http://www.pmq.com/recipe/view_recipe.php?id=52, the oil called for is olive oil. In writings by Tom Lehmann he usually recommends a lower grade olive oil than extra virgin olive oil, and even a blend of olive oil and vegetable/salad oil. See, for example, http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi?noframes;read=17559 and http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi?noframes;read=13438. I personally tend to use a light olive oil, like the Classico olive oil (in the bottle with the yellow label). However, I have also used some very good extra virgin olive oils and liked the pizzas with those oils also. There are temperature-related issues associated with using extra virgin olive oils, as commented upon by chiguy, but I can’t say that I noticed their effects in the Lehmann crusts I have made with the EVOO. However, I use only 1% oil, which is not a lot.

I might add that some people do not like extra virgin olive oils in their doughs. The use of extra virgin olive oils, and other oils as well, was a matter of much debate and discussion at this recent thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4423.msg36918.html#msg36918. Ultimately, the original poster, turbosundance, apparently concluded that the extra virgin olive oil (Kirkland brand) he was using was creating the peculiar tastes in his Lehmann crusts. When he switched to a lighter olive oil, the peculiar tastes went away, as noted at this post: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4423.msg37091.html#msg37091 (Reply 28).

Peter

Offline Art

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2007, 03:49:00 PM »
Peter/Chiguy, thanks much for the info. I've been using a cheaper extra virgin oil in my dough (looks to be a tad over 2%) and have had no problems. Up to now, I haven't been weighing my ingredients, but my new scale should arrive by the end of the week so I started playing with the calculator in preparation for my next dough batch. I, too, ordered a My Weigh 7001DX through Old Will Knot Scales and am really looking forward to using it. Hopefully,I'll be able to get some photos up one of these days. Thanks again, this is indeed a top-notch site.  Art
When baking, follow directions.  When cooking, go by your own taste.

Offline chiguy

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2007, 04:09:18 PM »
 Art
  At the very least your pizza making will be made much easier with the scale.
  Even after the mixing process is finished, scaling the proper dough ball weight is very usefull in developing your signiture crust thickness. It is amazing to me how 1 extra ounce of dough can really make or ruin a crust.   Chiguy   


Offline SemperFi

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2007, 04:16:25 PM »
Art
  At the very least your pizza making will be made much easier with the scale.
  Even after the mixing process is finished, scaling the proper dough ball weight is very usefull in developing your signiture crust thickness. It is amazing to me how 1 extra ounce of dough can really make or ruin a crust.   Chiguy   

Thats another problem that I know will be solved when my scale also arrives this Friday.  I just eyeball my portioning, and I know that I am using too much dough.  At least then, I won't have excess dough, or make too little for my needs.  My specific weight that I need is 11.31 oz for my dough balls. That is a pretty exact measurement.  Adam
Adam

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2007, 05:43:20 PM »
This may be a good time to mention that there is an upgrade to the Lehmann tool in the works. For one thing, it will permit users to specify a starting dough weight (in ounces or grams), along with a set of baker's percents, and the upgraded tool will calculate the quantities of ingredients needed to make that weight of dough ball. No thickness factor is required. So, in Adam's example, he can plug in the 11.31 ounces and the desired baker's percents and the tool will crunch out all the numbers. He will be able to specify the number of such dough balls, and the tool will give the collective quantities. He can then use his new scale to divide the total dough into whatever dough weights he wants.

There will also be a rectangular shape option as well as the current round shape in the upgraded Lehmann tool. Using the rectangular shape option will allow users to enter their pan dimensions for making square/rectangular pizzas, such as Sicilian or Grandma type. This is somewhat an extension of the Lehmann round shape but one that should be quite useful to those who want to make square/rectangular versions of the Lehmann formulation, or other square/rectangular pizzas as noted above.

There will be a few other features that should improve the usefulness of the tool. 

Peter
« Last Edit: January 17, 2007, 06:16:45 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Art

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2007, 07:00:28 PM »
Thats another problem that I know will be solved when my scale also arrives this Friday.  I just eyeball my portioning, and I know that I am using too much dough.  At least then, I won't have excess dough, or make too little for my needs.  My specific weight that I need is 11.31 oz for my dough balls. That is a pretty exact measurement.  Adam

Adam, You might not have to wait until Friday for your scale. I ordered mine just before 11am on Monday and UPS delivered it 10 minutes ago. That's pretty darn good service. It looks good and was well packed. So, tomorrow will be my first test with tasting on Sat or Sun.  ;D  Art
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Offline Boy Hits Car

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New & Improved Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #33 on: March 21, 2007, 09:34:28 PM »
Members may want to take note of the fact that an updated version of the Lehmann dough calculating tool is now available at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html. There are several useful changes to the original Lehmann tool including the following:

1. In addition to using the thickness factor approach, one can now use a known starting dough weight, along with a workable set of baker’s percents and the desired number of dough balls, and the tool will provide the ingredients and quantities based on the data inputted into the tool. There will be no need to enter a thickness factor (TF), although that option still exists.

2. Users of the Thickness Factor approach will now have the option of selecting the shape of the pizza, either round or rectangular (which includes square). The rectangular option should prove useful to those who want to make a “Sicilian” or so-called “grandma” style dough. In selecting this option, the tool prompts the user to enter the dimensions (length and width) of the pizza (or of a particular rectangular pan to be used).
 
3. Along with the standard salt choices, the enhanced Lehmann tool now allows users to select the Diamond Crystal brand of Kosher salt, which some members prefer over the Morton’s brand or is the only Kosher salt brand available to them where they shop.

4. A new “bowl residue” feature allows users to compensate for minor losses that can occur during the preparation of the dough (due to flour, water and dough sticking to bowls, implements, fingers, work surfaces, etc.). This compensation is achieved by specifying a particular percent increase in the quantities of ingredients. That percent will vary from case to case, but unless one is making a very wet and sticky dough it will usually be less than 4%. It is anticipated that users will determine the best percent to use in any given situation based on experience. If the finished dough exceeds the desired final dough weight, those with scales can always trim the final finished dough of the excess. When the Thickness Factor method is used, the “final” thickness factor reflecting the bowl residue amount will appear in the data section, and also in a printout of the results produced by the tool. To preserve all of the data, including the initial thickness factor before compensation, it is recommended that users print out a copy of the completed page, using the “Print” button provided for this purpose.

5. The data fields for several of the boxes into which values are entered have been expanded so that users can enter numbers with several decimal places. This should allow for increased precision and fine-tuning of the results produced by the tool, particularly for those who like to convert existing recipes to baker’s percents and to calculate thickness factors and the like and end up with numbers with several decimal places. It will be noted that if a user fails to enter a number into a box as required, that is, the entry box is left completely blank, the failure to enter a number (even a 0) will cause the error expression “NaN” to appear in the data section.

6. A Copy “button” has been included in the enhanced tool and allows users to copy information from the textual data section into posts or some other document, such as a Word document that might be used to compose replies to be posted on the forum. The information copied can be entered directly into the posts or other documents by using a menu “paste” command or a “Control + V” keyboard command. Using the Copy button ensures that all of the data line up, thereby eliminating the need to do corrective “realignment” work when previewing replies to be posted on the forum.

Good luck in using the enhanced Lehmann tool, and please feel free to offer feedback on the tool.

Mike

Offline acoustic blues

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2007, 09:10:12 AM »
Hi everybody. Just want wanted to say thank you for this calculator tool, in addition to everything about this site. I just started trying my hand at pizza making and would have to grade my first attempt as being on par or maybe a little better that the commercial pies from the frozen section at the store. I know that's not saying much, but you have to start somewhere, I guess :-[
I made a single dough ball for a 14" crust using the calculator last night and will make a pie tonight with it.
I use a stone and a peel and have a new digital scale that I didn't have before. I just kinda winged it on the weights. So I'm on my way to becoming a real pizza :chef: lol.
Anyway, thanks again, and I'll let you know how it comes out. I have high expectations; when you start at the bottom the only direction is up, lol.

AB in NEPA

Here's a pic of my first pie. I know, UGLY, but didn't taste half bad. I would take it over the ones from the store freezer.

« Last Edit: March 23, 2007, 09:11:46 AM by acoustic blues »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2007, 10:18:19 AM »
Reading acoustic blues' post reminded me of a couple of comments that might be useful when using the improved Lehmann dough calculating tool.

As regular readers of the forum know, the Lehmann tool does not convert flour or water to volume measurements. For those who have decent scales, this is not a problem. But for those who do not have scales, I'd like to mention that member November developed a tool for doing conversions of weights of flour (several types and brands) and water to volumes (and vice versa). The tool can be accessed at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ (on the left hand side). In converting weights to volumes using the tool, the method that should be used is the following: 1) stir the flour in the flour container to "fluff" it up, 2) lift flour from the flour container into your measuring cups with a tablespoon or scoop just to the point of overflowing, and 3) level off the top of the measuring cup(s) with the flat edge of a knife (or something similar that has a flat edge). When using measuring spoons, my practice is to level those also. Even following the foregoing steps, it may still be necessary to make minor adjustments of flour and/or water in the bowl as the dough is being made. No system can be 100% accurate in all cases in performing weight to volume conversions, and there are also extraneous factors like room humidity, moisture in the flour, etc., that can affect the condition of the final dough. Also, measuring cups and spoons come in many differents shapes and sizes, which will also affect the accuracy of conversions.

The second comment relates to salt. The Lehmann tool as it is presently constituted does not draw a distinction between fine sea salt and regular salt. But, as we have learned recently from discussions on salt at other threads, there are many types and brands of sea salt and the differences between them can be fairly significant and materially affect the actual or perceived "saltiness" of these salts in relation to ordinary table salt. Until and if we are able to get a better fix on what might be an appropriate relationship between sea salt and regular salt, users of sea salt may want to experiment with their particular types and brands to find what amount works best for them. I have been using sea salt (the "Real Salt" brand) interchangeably with regular table salt, but plan to gradually reduce my usage until I find the right amount for my palate. A reasonable starting point in using the tool may be to reduce the salt in the tool by 20-25% when substituting sea salt for regular table salt. Maybe members who do so can provide feedback on their experiences in making substitutions. This may help us determine at least a rough relationship between sea salt and table salt.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 05:05:59 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline mifan

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2008, 10:17:12 AM »
I am new in making pizza as well as a member in this forum. what I am trying my best to understand is that there seems factors need to be considered among gluten level, hydration content as well the oven temperature one may operate. there must be an optimal correlations among these factors. is there any tool which can take these factors in? probably these have been discussed already somewhere in the forum? I appreciate if anyone of you may direct me to the related postings if any. thank you

Offline mkc

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2008, 02:23:00 PM »
Wow - what a great tool!  Yes, this is my first post, but I've used the calculator a couple of times now and today noticed what I think might be a bug.

If there's a leading "0" in either the pizza diameter or the percent hydration, all the calculated values change. 

An "014" inch pizza results in about 27% less ingredients (a quick look says this is across the board for all ingredients) than a "14" inch pizza

An "063" hydration percentage results in 13% less water and 8% more flour, salt, sugar, and oil than a "63" hydration.


I didn't find any obvious leading "0" changes in any of the other fields.  If it matters, I'm using Firefox 3.0 

I found this because I was trying to tweak a recipe from a previous printout and was getting totally different results as my starting point.  I did a quick search of the board but didn't immediately find if someone had already noticed this behavior.

So now I'm re-creating my previous attempt without the leading "0"s, and boy, does my dough look easier to work with already!

Thanks!

Michelle

ETA:  Forgot to mention the only reason I had leading "0"s in there was being too lazy to backspace after clicking in the field to put in my desired numbers.  The fields are pre-loaded with the "0" and a mouse-click in them places the cursor after the "0".
« Last Edit: September 03, 2008, 02:31:16 PM by mkc »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #38 on: September 03, 2008, 08:07:06 PM »
Michelle,

I'm glad you like the tool. In case you don't know it, the Lehmann dough calculating tool is one of several dough calculating tools, as you will discover if you go to http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html.

I will pass on your comments about the leading 0s to Boy Hits Car (Mike), who did the programming for the dough calculating tools. As you discovered, the tool is intended to be used with straight percents, not percents with leading 0s.

Peter

Offline mkc

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Re: Lehmann Dough Calculator
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2008, 11:35:16 AM »
Thanks, Pete.  Most folks will probably never run into this (as they're probably not lazy engineers like me  ::) ), but if it saves just one pizza.....

Michelle


 

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