Author Topic: Brick oven  (Read 3792 times)

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Offline Randy

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Brick oven
« on: April 24, 2004, 03:33:26 PM »
Watch the pizza video.
http://www.mugnaini.com/index_1.html

Randy


Offline SemperFi

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2007, 08:39:05 AM »
Wow, does it really take that much wood to maintain a fire?  This really could run into some money. 
Adam

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2007, 10:09:12 AM »
Wow, does it really take that much wood to maintain a fire?  This really could run into some money. 

I think wood is not a particularly expensive ingredient for making high-quality pizza, although I only fire my oven a few times per week. I haven't kept close track of my yearly wood consumption since I use logs for my BBQ pit as well as the fireplaces in my home. I know the cost of wood varies greatly from locale to locale. I pay about $175 per cord for oak. Also, I am not firing up the oven just to make pizza. I bake breads, roast meats, etc., with the residual heat.

Bill/SFNM

Offline SemperFi

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2007, 01:30:46 PM »
Bill,

Yeah, I am out here in Southern California, where everything costs money.  At $175 for a full cord, and looking at the consumption rate for the Prima 120, 388 cooking hours at full temp is respectable.  But how much wood do you use to kick it off?  Obviously maintenance of temp uses less wood than the initial preheat phase.  Mugnaini states 13 lbs per hour, figure minimum 1 hour preheat, an hour of cooking..#26 sound right to you?  I know that residual cooking for the many hours afterwards does reduce overall costs.  I would love to bake other breads in there to.  I did see elsewhere in this forum that cooking meats does not affect flavors of your breads, as the oils disintegrate, but does it not leave bitter residue?  Thanks for the info though.  Adam
Adam

Offline SemperFi

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2007, 01:43:37 PM »
Bill,

Got another question for you...preheating in cooler weather..do you take it slower to reduce the chance of thermal shock?  We just hit 32 here...in SoCal, and I was wondering if it was something to consider.  Thanks again.  Adam
Adam

Offline SemperFi

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2007, 01:54:25 PM »
After a lil research, I found a 1/4 cord for $95 out here in SoCal.  Mix of oak and eucalyptus.  Gotta love LA! Adam
Adam

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2007, 01:56:11 PM »
Mugnaini states 13 lbs per hour, figure minimum 1 hour preheat, an hour of cooking..#26 sound right to you?
Adam,

I preheat my oven for about 5 hours, but mine is overbuilt with a very large thermal mass. Also, I must be cooking at much hotter temps than Mugnaini since my pies cook in half the time as the one in the video so I clearly use more fuel.

At the temps I bake at, any meat residue is long gone after the five hour preheat.

Bill/SFNM

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2007, 01:58:36 PM »
After a lil research, I found a 1/4 cord for $95 out here in SoCal.  Mix of oak and eucalyptus.  Gotta love LA! Adam

I have never burned Eucalyptus, but have been told it burns so hot that it can damage a home fireplace. Not sure if this is true or if it would apply to a pizza oven but you may want to talk with the manufacturer of your pizza oven if there is one.

Bill


Offline SemperFi

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2007, 02:52:46 PM »
I have never burned Eucalyptus, but have been told it burns so hot that it can damage a home fireplace. Not sure if this is true or if it would apply to a pizza oven but you may want to talk with the manufacturer of your pizza oven if there is one.

Bill



Wouldn't that be a nice lil surprise.  Spend $3 grand on a oven, then blow it out by using improper fuels.  Thanks for the info Bill.  Adam
Adam

Offline firedup

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Re: Brick oven
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2007, 11:15:24 PM »
Hi Gu7ys, just quck note from Australia, home of the eucalyptus (or gum tree as we call them here)

I running nothing but gum in my brick dome oven and it can burn hot depenfing on the species, red gum and iron box will produce very high temp, messate the most comman burns very well, leave very little ash and keeps a nice bead of coals.

in short if burning gum tree you dont need a lot to bring an oven upto a good cooking temp. I would only use a wheel barrow load (15kg) for a whole firing

cheers

Firedup


Offline jwnorris

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Re: Brick oven & Eucalyptus
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2007, 10:38:39 AM »
I have never burned Eucalyptus, but have been told it burns so hot that it can damage a home fireplace. <snip>

I have also heard that eucalyptus has a lot of resins and is not good for a WFO.  I would appreciate any thoughts.

J W
 8)


 

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