Author Topic: Pizzeria Bianco  (Read 28905 times)

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Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #40 on: September 12, 2006, 07:30:40 PM »
Very nice post. It is nice to hear someone in the pizzabusiness with such a passion. I have just landed in Naples for my Pizzafest visit. I would like to make some comments, not critiques, but comments (that is my point of view):

Sourcing flour locally instead of America, Russia, Italy or whatever is not the point. The point is sourcing the best possible flour for the product you want to make. Romans used to import grains for their flour from north Africa, Spain and Sicily. Importing grain/flour is not new (refer to "6000 years of bread"). Same story can be told about other long-life ingredient such as canned tomatoes, olive oil, Prosciutto (for fresh sausages I would agree to set up a farm of the "casertana" breed) etc.. If the best canned tomatoes comes from x place in the world, then I would like to get it.... Olive oil then, is pressed once a year and if you get it at the beginning of the season (October/November in Italy) then is fresh, if you get it the following Summer, then is not so fresh. Coming from the producer next door doesn't guarantee freshness. A different story is for fresh produce. I always try to tell my clients to source locally and if it is possible, try to work with the local produce supplier so to identify varieties and grow them to order. On the mozzarella subject, if you cannot get a good fresh product and you can produce a better one, that is welcome. However I always have a good laugh when I read american writers criticising some Neapolitan pizzeria for not making their own Mozzarella.. Where is the point? If I have the best Cheesemaker in the world 30 minutes drive from my pizzeria (delivering fresh everymorning), while would I bother making my own mozzarella?? let me concentrate on the dough and the oven management.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2006, 07:36:25 PM by pizzanapoletana »


Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #41 on: September 12, 2006, 09:07:27 PM »
pizzanapoletana,
Thank you for sharing your expert point of view. I was hoping you would chime in on this thread and as usual you have not disappointed us. You are truly an asset and we all appreciate the value you bring to our humble forum.

You above all others understand the intricacies associated with producing a product of the highest quality. In your case, it is the Neapolitan style which is the mother of all styles. It is refreshing to know a super level of quality really does exist in the world of pizza. Nearly all of the pizzerias I have been to unfortunately subscribe to the business model of sourcing the cheapest ingredients as well as cutting back on the dough preparation and oven management. Much to my chagrin those same establishments proclaim their commitment to excellence. Nothing could be further from the truth.

In Chris Bianco's particular case, I'm sure your expert eye for detail could make a number of constructive comments and perhaps there will come a point in time where you will share those with us. Even better would be if Chris would follow up with his commitment to join pizzamaking.com and collaborate with all of us. Of course since I'm openly dreaming here, I might as well wish for the ultimate scenario where I would moderate an artisanal pizza discussion with you, Ron (Il Pizzaiolo), Chris (Bianco), Anthony (UPN), and Evelyne Slomon. To my knowledge, you five represent the pinnacle of what is possible in the world of pizza. The only thing better would be if my beloved Philadelphia Eagles would win a Super Bowl but I cannot see that event occurring anytime soon either.

Getting back to Chris Bianco's position on quality, I firmly believe he is on the same page as you with respect to quality. He will only source locally if the product is of the highest quality and he described many relationships with his suppliers where that was not the case initially. However, over time he has been able to develop the perfect blend of local availability, freshness and unsurpassed quality. He will not source a product just because it is convenient. It has to fit a very precise requirement.

Not all of Chris's products are sourced from America. It simply isn't possible to source all of one's products from one country and maintain the ultra-stringent quality standard of "World's Best." I know his Spiedini has Italian Fontina, Anchovies are from Sicily, and Mortadella is from Modena. In addition, he offers a number of red and white wines from Italy.

I know I'm dreaming but please don't pinch me. I might wake up.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2006, 09:09:49 PM by pftaylor »
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Offline Peteg

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #42 on: September 14, 2006, 03:26:41 PM »
Pftaylor,
             This is the thread that I've been waiting for since you mentioned going to Bianco's a while back.  Thanks so much for the documentation and insight into what makes Chris Bianco such a unique pizzaiolo.  Knowing your excellent taste for pizza sauce, I have a couple of questions for you.  Everything that I have read about Bianco's suggests that he uses fresh organic tomatoes be it San Marzano or other.  One popular review online talks about his sauce tasting like the "the ripest tomatoes concentrated".  With Bianco's fresh in your memory, did his sauce mirror your own with fresh tomatoes simply ground and seeded or did it have another dimension.  It's hard to imagine exactly what course he is taking with his sauce but I could possibly see him roasting fresh tomatoes to consentrate the flavor and add another flavor dimension.  Of course no sugar right?  Hard to say since I haven't been able to make the trip yet, but hopefully sometime in the near future.  Thanks again for all of your contributions.  Pete g

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2006, 06:43:35 AM »
Pete g,
I'm glad my work is of value to you. I have a blast traveling around the U.S. pizza hunting. In the past month or so I went to four well known pizzerias with only one being a huge disappointment (Grimaldi's of Old Scottsdale). Settebello in Las Vegas, Spacca Napoli in Chicago, and Bianco in Phoenix were all top notch in their own way. What is the difference between a Grimaldi's and the other three? Easy answer. Settebello, Spacca Napoli, and Bianco all try to produce the best pie they can. The owners surely get up every day with the goal of producing their best. Grimaldi's doesn't.

When I complained about the lack of charring and the ten minute bake time on the day I went to Grimaldi's the manager on duty, Nick, confessed that the oven wasn't cranked up because they weren't expecting a big lunch crowd. What? I had to do a double take on that one. I then asked what the size of the crowd had to do with operating a coal oven at the proper temperature. Temperatures Grimaldi's is known for. Nick didn't have a plausible answer and I didn't have any appetite for chain store type pizza. Suffice to say that the pie was so bad that I ended up leaving a few slices behind. That type of business decisioning on the part of Grimaldi's ownership is representative of poor thinking and it borders on deceptive practices. It smacks of they wouldn't spend the extra money to give their customers what they are really paying for and more importantly what they advertise. Afterall, only a small group of customers was disappointed so who is to really notice. Repulsive business practice and not one which the boys in Brooklyn would stand for I'm sure. For the record, I have eaten at Grimaldi's of Old Scottsdale twice over the past year and each time there has been an oven issue of one sort or another. I will not go back. With that out of the way, let's discuss your question in some detail.

Out of the five pies we ordered, only two had any tomato sauce on them at all - the Margherita and Sonny Boy. The Margherita, which was my personal favorite, did have what was perhaps the best balance of crust, cheese, and sauce I have ever had the pleasure of eating. It also had an industrial strength Basil leaf or two on it which was as strong and flavorful as my home-grown Neapolitan Basil. I can't really say that the sauce stood out. In fact, I'm sure it did not. It wasn't designed to. I'm certain the sauce blended perfectly with what I had imagined a Margherita should taste like. I enjoyed mouthfuls of;
- pure crust (when eating the rim),
- crust and sauce,
- crust and cheese,
- crust, sauce, and cheese, and finally
- crust, sauce, cheese, and basil.

I found each one of the five different possibilities listed above to be highly desirable. For whatever reason, they matched my preconceived notion of what they should taste like. And isn't that why pizza is such a good comfort food. When times are good, we all go out and get a good pizza because we just "know" how it will taste and it adds to the fun. When times are bad, we all go out and get a pie because we "know" we can count on it being just as we remembered the last time. It is the perfect food in that sense isn't it?

What was amazing about the Margherita, for me, was how Chris designed it - where the crust was the real star of the show. The uber intentional showcasing of the crust was not the case with any of the other pies we ordered. On all the other pies, the toppings were the stars. They simply overpowered the crust and reminded me of a California style of pie. I think that may have been why the Rosa scored so high. The combination of unusual topping combinations nearly stopped all of us in our tracks and caused us to actually think about what we just ate. In my case, I savored every bite.

The genius of Chris Bianco, in my mind, is his ability to produce completely different styles of pies at the highest levels of quality. All the while producing an overall taste which was simply delicious. I mentioned in the original post about how everyone at our table felt that their last place selection was still better than any pizza they had ever eaten. Imagine that. The worst this guy has to offer was still better than the best we had all ever had. My head is still trying to digest that one.

If I had to isolate the base taste of his tomato sauce I would say they were similar to other tomatoes I had eaten while at the Scottsdale Princess during my stay. That is to say, they tasted completely different from the Florida Ugly Ripe. How? Well they seemed to possess a different texture and flavor profile bordering on creamy and fresh rather than what I'm used to which could be described as meaty and fresh. My sauce is chunky and fresh, Bianco's was creamy and fresh with some sort of organic tinge. I did not detect any spices in his sauce save perhaps for salt.

Let me know how else I can assist.
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Offline Barry

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #44 on: September 15, 2006, 10:33:30 AM »
pftaylor,

I have really enjoyed the 2 videos that you shared with us via YouTube, particularly the one of Chris making up a pizza from scratch.

What has really intrigued me is the way he hand stretched the base. The speed was lightning fast !  The dough balls seemed to be extreemely "slack" and highly extensible. I once experienced some similar dough that was very "wet" (hydration level of 66%) and I had also added some dough enhancer (consisting mainly of enzymes) to my recipe. This was also after a 4 day fermentation in the fridge.

With the hand stretching, I believe that there was absolutely minimal removal of any of the gasses in the dough, and this showed in the pictures attached to your original post in this thread.

Love this thread !

Kind regards.

Barry

Offline David

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #45 on: September 15, 2006, 08:31:54 PM »
PFT,
      Very pleased for you and I KNOW exactly how you must have felt this week.Great stuff...........
I must admit that I was somewhat skeptical about Bianco's and all the hype that has surrounded it.I have yet to get there myself,and as much as I generally found the CD Interview featuring him disappointing - Chris came across to me as a genuine, humble and "feet on the ground" guy who immediately earned my total respect for his kind words and comments regarding UPN, the use of Mixers,etc.From speaking to Anthony at UPN and reading your review it's clear that Passion is the common "secret Ingredient" and you just can't teach someone that.
I've just got back from an exhausting ,mind spinning four days in Naples (Italy).I hope to sort my head/photos out over the next few days.Later...
                                                 David
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline Peteg

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #46 on: September 15, 2006, 11:20:42 PM »
PFT,
       Apparently I should have been buying the DOP Arizona's instead...  Who knew.  Correct me if I'm wrong but don't you burmix your sauce before spreading it?  Do you leave your sauce on the chunky side on purpose or is that just a characteristic of the ugly ripes?  After being exposed to this new type of sauce will you be searching for the "creamy fresh" tomato or does the ugly ripe still remain in first place in your book.  I'm sure that I'm not the only one on this forum that places a great deal of value in your oppinion whatever it may be.  Thanks again, Pete g

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #47 on: September 18, 2006, 06:53:53 AM »
Peteg,
While Chris has impacted my pizza thinking on many levels, perhaps the one which ranks highest is the notion of working with local farmers to obtain the best they have to offer. What it means for me is simply this; I will locate a farmers market, determine which farmer(s) offer the highest quality ingredients available and I will strike up a relationship with them. Surely locally grown tomatoes will be part of that process. The days of sourcing vegetables from Publix supermarkets are over. Permanently.

David,
I look forward to learning about your Naples adventure.
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Offline ELeight

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #48 on: September 28, 2006, 11:45:38 AM »
PFT,

Great post!  Your ability to get to know people on first meeting is unbelievable.  I was wondering if you knew if Chris put on the Berkshire sausage in a raw state or if you thought it might be precooked?  Ditto on the purple onion?  Probably raw? 
Thanks,

Erik

Offline giotto

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #49 on: October 06, 2006, 09:20:57 PM »
I found it intriguing that my words were mimicked by Chris regarding how each style has its place. I sometimes feel like a minority since so many people tend to protect their home towns (e.g., Chicago, CA, NY, Naples, etc.).

I think it's important to differentiate between fresh vs. aged, suggesting that some things are better fresh, while other things are better aged. Chris, for example, uses a BIGA, which suggests aging of his dough. Here, his ingredient is fresh; but then he ages it... Not to kill it; but to improve it. The primary difference between a BIGA and Poolish is the % hydration; but in both cases, they suggest the use of a yeast fermentation, rather than a natural fermentation where the yeast is developed. BIGAs and Poolishs allow a slow development with minimal amounts of commercial yeast, and require a 2 step process (first BIGA is formed, then dough); but unlike a natural starter, they are generally less aged; and can be easily recreated. Their purpose of course is many fold, including minimizing yeast activity during bacterial fermentations, and to add either lactic acids or acedic acids, depending on temperatures used. The fact that Chris is using refrigeration, he is going for a slightly stronger acedic acid; but certainly, not to the level of a long term naturally aged starter. When not working with sour doughs where natural starters are employed, guys like Sullivan at ACME bread and others in the SF area work with commercial yeast based BIGAs and Poolishes. And these guys are about as passionate as anyone in their trade.

In the case of cheeses, aging can be a very good thing as well. With Parmesan, for example, Chris would use an aged ingredient. But with mozzarella, he has naturally chosen to make his own because it serves not to be aged and produce a strong taste, which is preferred with other cheeses.

Regarding Giusto, it's important to note some differences between their organic and non-organic. Organic means no malted barley. So a bread flour like their Artisan contains barley; whereas their Baker's Choice is an organic and does not contain it. The result of course is a difference in color, since Barley serves to extract sugars from starches. When in an oven that can produce pizza in 60 seconds, no biggy. At home with 600F, you'll see the difference. So I prefer the use of Baker's Choice at times; but I mix it with a flour that contains Barley so I don't have to mix it myself (flours only contain .1% barley apparently). Both of these flours are noted as Bread; but they contain less than 12%, which is preferred by the likes of Il Fornaio, ACME and other bread companies in the bay area. They are both made of Hard Red Winter wheat. Whereas, Giusto's ORGANIC Ultimate Performance flour is at 13.5% and is made up of Northern Spring. Giusto's will mix for you, and I believe that Chris is doing just that.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2006, 09:22:28 PM by giotto »


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #50 on: October 06, 2006, 09:50:25 PM »
giotto,

Unfortunately, in Chris Bianco's case the term "biga" doesn't help us out all that much since the term has come to be used in a somewhat generic sense to mean a classic biga (as you described it), a sponge, poolish or pre-fermented dough. This is frequently done by bakers to lend an Italian authenticity to their baked goods. More information would be required to specifically determine what Chris is actually doing. In practice, all forms of preferments will have a positive effect but the effects will be different for the different preferment forms. Also, some types of baked goods benefit more from one type of preferment than another.

Peter

Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #51 on: October 06, 2006, 11:41:35 PM »
Congratulations PFTaylor!  Exactly what type of load did you use to bag this particular elusive elephant.  I found Mr. Bianco to be a very humble and genuine guy.  You did this forum a tremendous service.  Thank you! 
Don't lose the pictures, Steve.  We'll need 'em for the coffee table book.

Offline giotto

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #52 on: October 07, 2006, 01:32:29 PM »
Pete-zza:

My goal was not to re-engineer since you can't re-engineer what's really important here, which is the person behind the scene; not the scene itself.

My goal was to put things in perspective as far as quality ingredients, and their relationship to aged, fresh or modified. Grapes from different regions produce different results, and wines excel or suffer accordingly. The same is true of produce and other foods. When Heirloom tomato season is over, I will have to travel far and wide in the SF region to get a good tasting tomato. But for now, I can avoid all processing, since the Heirlooms that I work with have transparent skins. BUT, there are some local farmers who produce non-sprayed tomatoes that I would displace with a canned tomato that was packaged ripe from a tastier region any day of the week.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, aged or modified over time can in some cases produce a superior result for some ingredients and outcomes. Some of the better salsas that I have enjoyed, for example, are those where the peppers are first dehydrated, and then rehydrated before the peppers are filtered through a sieve. On the other hand, I would rather do away with a food that requires ginger than use dried in the absence of fresh ginger. Chris is a precise individual. His use of the term BIGA, along with his reference to refrigeration, reveals his interest to age a fresh ingredient.

The thing that I continue to walk away with from Chris' interviews is that it all comes down to Chris' culinary experience, the level that he is driven to take it, and his desire to do business locally when possible. And while many culinary artists have taken it to the extreme with non-pizza foods, Chris has shown that he is very rare in his passion to take it to such a level with pizza (from his product to the experience that he has created with his environment). And once taken to that level, people have a real hard time putting up with the absolute pathetic response that Taylor received from Grimaldi's, where savings are more important than the experience... A mentality that I'm afraid has become predominant and pushed by consummers as well, where coupons reign supreme and outsourcing occurs for all the wrong reason.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2006, 02:02:41 PM by giotto »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #53 on: October 07, 2006, 03:55:14 PM »
giotto,

I was speaking only for myself when I mentioned the biga. Ever since I started the thread on reverse engineering Dom DeMarco's dough at DiFara's in Brooklyn, one of the first things that crosses my mind when I find an interesting dough formulation is to try to figure out what it constitutes and how it works. Not so much as to rush right out and try to recreate it, although I may do that from time to time too, just as we both did with the Trader Joe's dough, but as much to try to understand the processes and reasons behind the dough formulation. I recently had an opportunity to watch Anthony Mangieri at work at Una Pizza Napoletana in NYC and when Anthony told me that he was using a combination of a natural preferment and old dough, I was naturally interested in what Anthony was doing with his preferments, just as I was interested in what Chris was doing with his biga. I might add that my interest in preferments in general has been heightened lately anyway as I have been studying up on the different preferments to better understand how they work and may best be used in pizza making. As you know, the permutations and possibilities are virtually endless but most likely only a small percentage of them are workable as a practical matter.

Your interest in the natural and organic foods movement and supporting local producers is a longstanding one. I clearly remember your interest in these matters back in the early days when we collaborated so often on the forum. At the time, the significance of what you were saying didn't mean all that much to me personally because at the time the Texas organics food movement was in its nascent stage (it's better now but not anything like California). I suspected when pftaylor posted on his visit to Pizzeria Bianco that you would be interested in learning more about what Chris was doing and that you would react favorably to it because it clearly fits with your own philosophy. One of my own first reactions to what Chis is doing was to try to find a local source of olive oil, just as Chris is using locally produced Arizona olive oil (I subsequently learned that there are now three producers of olive oil in Arizona). Most people are unaware of the fact that Texas is developing an olive oil industry. Unfortunately, the first commercial production of olive oil in meaningful quantities will be sometime next year. In the meantime, I have bought a bottle of California olive oil produced by the California Olive Ranch from one of the same olive varietals, arbequina, that Texas producers are using. The oil has been winning prizes and I hope to try it on a pizza soon.

Peter

Offline giotto

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #54 on: October 07, 2006, 07:07:38 PM »
Pete-zza:

Yep, I still think about standing there at 2am (starting time) to watch the production bakery for Il  Fornaio make their dough for TJs along with various breads. Since then, I've studied things more from the wheat fields, into the factories (that use stone vs. large rollers), and some of the passionate people behind the small mom/pop kind of artisan bakeries in the US where they pay more attention to the dough.

I often think about a guy in Half Moon Bay, CA (Rogue Chef) who like Bianco talks about the soil, local farmers, farm raised vs. wild fish, and how all this relates to our daily lives and local business-to-business. What an uphill battle for him in this area, where people are so often looking for the best deal. He taught me that some things in the US were not to be reproduced exactly from Italy. That was a tough one for me to swallow. I started to put things together though with regard to the value of localization, and the Italian pride associated with regionalization. In the Silicon Valley, the greedy (Venture Capitalists) love outsourcing. While the workers dread it. What goes around though, comes around. You buy things at severe discounts => this results in reduced labor costs and outsourcing => the guy who wanted the severe discount gets layed off. It's a thin rope to walk. Now it's no longer safe to be in a professional job, unless local service is required. And of course, Californians are taking a hard look at places like Tx due to its diversity, Real Estate, etc.

I got a flyer the other day for Round Table that definitely suggested a new level of awareness that is so critical to us few. They advertised their "ARTISAN PIZZA", that included (ready for this) organic tomato sauce, fresh mozz, fresh basil, etc. It's not that I have high expectations for it or anything. And I don't particularly like it when the big guy nudges out the little guy in his own space based on marketing alone. But their desire to market this suggested a definite awareness. I wonder if this was hitting just this area... Have you seen this AD as well?

If you tell someone you are into making something like wine, they're cool about it. But you mention dough, and they starting looking for your 3rd eye. I feel like I'm moving at a snail's pace though, and I'm far more critical of my stuff vs. other people. But this is partially because, like you, I try so many different things that I feel like I am constantly touching the surface. I keep asking myself, where the heck is this taking me. Maybe a brick oven will help provide an answer.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2006, 07:20:32 PM by giotto »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #55 on: October 07, 2006, 08:43:35 PM »
giotto,

The people on this forum don't miss anything: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3797.msg31646.html#msg31646.

Peter

Offline REMOISE

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #56 on: October 09, 2006, 01:08:24 PM »
that was really awsome now i will really go to phoenix...yummy! Great pictures!

Offline scott r

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #57 on: February 28, 2007, 06:23:54 AM »
This past weekend I had the pleasure of meeting Chris and tasting all of his signature pizzas over the course of two days.  I have to say that he is producing some of the best pizza I have ever tasted, right on par with my other favorite Il Pizzaiolo in Pittsburgh.  To me both of these pizzerias are miles ahead of everything else I have found here in the US. While talking to chris it is obvious that he is a very deep thinker, and the conversations with him have left me revisiting his words for days pondering what was talked about.   I am so glad I made the 6 hour drive from los angeles.    He is such a great guy, and I really felt a connection with him for a number of reasons pizza related and not. He even sent me out of the pizzeria with a can of his tomatoes!  Because of that I feel bad disclosing on the internet some of what I found out about his techniques and ingredients.  I do, however, have a few things that I want to mention that I am pretty sure he will not mind me saying.

Chris's pizza to me had a lot more in common with elite NY style pizza than the pizza in naples.  It is not soggy at all, but is quite a bit chewier than what you would find in a neapolitan pizzeria.  The only thing I found "neapolitan" about his pizza is that the high hydration dough is cooked in a wood burning oven and uses top of the line ingredients.

I could be crazy here, but I really don't think he is making 1-1.5 minute pies like many on this board have mentioned.  I didn't time anything, but I have to say that my guess would be somewhere closer to 3 minute pies.  This explains my above comments about being more NY style (totonnos, john's, etc.).  At one point I saw chris reach deep into the oven with his bare hands and pop some bubbles in the dough.  I can't imagine he could do this with the 800 degree oven that he would need to do 1.5 minute pies. 

These pies had a really strong smoke flavor because of the longer bake.  I absolutely LOVED this.   This trait, and chris' pizza actually reminded me very much of the pizza served around (not in) naples, and especially my favorite pizzeria in Sorrento italy.

Chris mentioned that his favorite pizza in Italy is actually made in the liguria region and is technically considered focaccia there.

Chris mentioned that the home baker might want to try an unusual method for getting higher temps.   He suggested using the broiler and taking a butane torch to the bottom of the pizza stone before sliding the pizza on it.

Don't believe everything you read.  I don't think Chris was intentionally deceiving anyone, but I can say that some of what I found out goes against what I have read in this thread and in other posts on this forum.

I did not need to ask him this, so I guess it is ok to just go out and say it.  Chris is not using a wild yeast starter culture.  He is definitely using commercial yeast.  It was plainly obvious to me as soon as I tried his bread and his pizza.


Offline Peteg

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #58 on: February 28, 2007, 08:23:42 AM »
Scott,
        It looks like I just missed you.  I was there last Tuesday, and came away with the same impression.  You can read my review here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4693.0.html
Glad you finally had a chance to get to PB.

Offline vitoduke

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Re: Pizzeria Bianco
« Reply #59 on: February 28, 2007, 08:56:12 AM »
Hi Scott---We are going to be in Sorrento. Which Pizzeria did you like?---Thanks---Mel