Author Topic: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona  (Read 9905 times)

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Offline pizzagirl

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Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« on: August 21, 2006, 03:39:28 PM »
Here's a thread for the Patsy Grimaldi's - Coal Brick Oven - Pizzeria's in Arizona. This may take many posts to cover a review, so feel free to jump in at anytime with any questions or comments. I will update as often as time allows. I will first start out with my favorite hang out, the Chandler at Ocotillio location. As the picture describes, this upscale Desert Oasis produces their legendary pie in style and taste. They are open 7 days a week from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and midnights on Friday and Saturday. The official website for the Arizona locations ( Which is different than the New York locations) http://www.patsygrimaldis.com
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...


Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2006, 11:09:48 PM »
This thread is dedicated to those who have never had a opportunity to visit Grimaldi's. For those whom have, this thread will be a little redundant. I would like to / advise / recommend / to those who have not, whom have a better chance of visiting the West someday, rather than New York for whatever reasons. Arizona has three locations and and rumor is a forth, (shhhhhhh) quiet. For Example: A quick airline lay over in Phoenix from Las Vegas, could yield you a Bianco's and a Grimaldi's quickly, provided you can get it through Airport Security. Like I said, feel free to jump in at anytime with comments or questions. Here's a few pics, and some more if their is enough interest in the thread ???
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2006, 09:54:40 AM »
pizzagirl,
Count me in as a fan of the style of pizza they make. I wrote a review last October about Grimaldi's. Your post is related to the same location I went to. Memory tells me they had significant oven door issues back then which led to a very long bake time - approximately four minutes. Apparently the door on coal fired ovens must be kept closed to keep the heat up. The resultant crust was hard as a brick. I trust the oven issues have been resolved and their crust has returned to the wheaty soft texture as in Brooklyn?

Grimaldi's pies have excellent toppings. The cheese is creamy and the sausage is the best I have ever eaten. The balance of the pie however, in my opinion, is thrown off by the overly sweet sauce they use. My palatte can immediately taste the sugar added to the sauce. Instead of it tasting fresh it comes across to me as artifically sweetened. It ends up dominating the crust and cheese. Frankly, even with these very fixable faults, I would die to have a Grimaldi's in Tampa. You are fortunate.

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Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2006, 02:29:52 PM »
It appears that the oven door issues have been resolved. They may have shipped in an aged door from some other location. I can safely say the cook times are under four minutes. I will have to time it, that will give me something to do this weekend while I'm hanging out. The crust seems to be fine at this time, even though I do like mine a little extra crispy. I will have to look into the sugar issue, let me get back with you on that. Because of their long hours of operation, and their extensive wine and beer cellar, sports t.v. etc. You can learn a lot just hanging out. Sometimes you practically have the place to to yourself, and other times it's packed to the rafters. Over the past year all of my pies have been consistant. I'm sorry pftaylor I did not know you reviewed this last October. It's nice that you know what I mean by extensive, etc. I will have to agree that the sausage is one of my favorite toppings also. It has a rich Italian fennel flavor and aroma. Here is some pics of that exact tomato pie - Thank you for your post ...
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline Glutenboy

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2006, 05:02:43 PM »
Beautiful pics...  I'm drooling on my keyboard!!!   :o
Quote under my pic excludes Little Caesar's.

Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2006, 04:32:18 PM »
Here's a snap of their White Pizza, I added fresh tomatoes as a topping. The color combination of the Italian Flag makes for an interesting photo. The White Pizza is so tasty that I order one regular red pizza and one white each visit.

Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2006, 04:07:11 PM »
Here's a snap of the Pepperoni, notice that volcano effect in Pic#2.

Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2006, 07:13:29 PM »
Here's a snap of fresh sliced Tomatoes and Italian Sausage custom request.

Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline Trinity

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2006, 05:21:41 AM »
 ::)

OMFG!!! :o


 DROOL!!!
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2006, 06:47:47 PM »
Here's a great reason to fire up your smoker this weekend. In these snaps you are witness to one of the greatest pies ever, Coal Brick Oven Roasted Sweet Red Peppers for a topping. The best part is you can make it at home !!! It's hard to tell in the snaps, but it is only Red Peppers with San Marzano Sauce and Cheese period. As soon as you open the box, your entire house smells fabulous for two days. Get out your BBQ Smoker, buy some Sweet Red Bell Peppers. Use the wood you brought back from camping for that for that deep woods soot flavor. I religiously use Pine from the forest in my smoker. Cut them into small strips and remove seeds. You can also do the same for other toppings such as Mushrooms, Garlic Bulbs in a tin with Olive Oil, Onions, etc. Heavy smoke them - When done freezer bag them for a later date as they keep for months. The reason to keep them for a later date is this. When your spending your whole Saturday over the smoker your clothes and everything smells like camping. So if you wait a week or so to use it as a topping you will appreciate it that much more later. This is also a great inventory to have around the house for omelette's etc. Feel free to post any comments or replies, everyone have a great weekend ....
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...


Offline pizzagirl

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2006, 03:34:16 PM »
Sweet Red Bell Peppers ...
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline gottabedapan

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2006, 07:30:53 PM »
Quote
I religiously use Pine from the forest in my smoker.

Just a friendly reminder: make sure your wood is completely seasoned (dry) before burning it, especially when using a coniferous species such as pine or cedar: incompletely seasoned (green) wood releases creosote, which is highly toxic in high concentrations, when burned.

Offline Kidder

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2006, 07:43:53 PM »
That pizza looks amazing. Nicely charred with a decent amount of sauce. Thanks for putting those up.

Offline jkandell

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona - tucson
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2008, 04:00:53 AM »
Just a quick note that Grimaldi's opened in Tucson recently.  I was really disappointed.  We got  basically only slightly  better than the big chains.  They're situated in a building that looks a lot like the Phx one above, but is across from the University so has a "college" atmosphere.  Atmosphere was fairly franchise like, with same menus in the Phx.  The olive oil was of low quality.  The crust was "coal fired", but bland and uneventful.  (I read with interest the comments above, but this crust didn't have that extra "something" doughs usually have when aged.)  I ordered extra sauce, but ended up leavingit, since it was equally bland and unspectacular in any way.  (It was not overly sugared, however, in contrast to one reviewer of Phx above.)  The cheese appeared to be the soft fresh kind, so I'll give them that.  My overall conclusion is that the quality of the ingredients (tomatoes, oil, flour) wasn't very good aside from the cheese.  I've never tasted their pizza in NYC, but given its reputation it's <i>got</i> to be better than this. 
« Last Edit: February 23, 2008, 01:49:49 PM by jkandell »

Offline pcampbell

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2008, 07:39:01 AM »
To me this pizza looks almost too thin like it's getting dry and crackery - at least from the pics.

I would not be surprised if there is no olive oil in the sauce though.

The whole chain of Grimaldi's confuses me.  They have 3 locations in AZ, whatever is in New York.  Hoboken, and then Brooklyn Pizza in Hackensack and Ridgewood, NJ.   Do Grimaldi family members actually work in all of these locations?
Patrick

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2008, 09:19:06 AM »
Haven't looked at this thread in a while and I know that they are going to peel those red peppers, but I just hate it when resteraunts do not wash and prepare their food as I would at home.  You can still see the produce stickers on those peppers.  As good as they might be ,  you gotta wonder what else they cut corners on  -Marc

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2008, 09:27:17 AM »
While I was in Arizona last month visiting my son and his family, I had occasion to try out a pizza from Grimaldi’s in the Old Town section of Scottsdale, AZ. Grimaldi’s is best known for its pizzeria in Brooklyn, NY (http://www.grimaldis.com/), but it has recently been expanding in other parts of the country. Arizona now has three locations in the Phoenix area. From what I have read, the Arizona locations were the idea of Joe (Joey) Ciolli, a member of the Ciolli family that bought out the original Grimaldi’s and name and who attended college in Arizona. That apparently explains the Arizona presence. There apparently are many other store openings in the works. One opened recently in Dallas, and several others are apparently scheduled in Texas over the next several years.

As pretty much everyone knows, I am a sucker for reverse engineering popular pizzas and dough formulations. So I attempted to do the same at the Scottsdale Grimaldi’s. I managed to strike up a conversation with one of the store managers who quite surprisingly answered most of the questions I posed to him about their pizzas. Based on his answers and some follow-up research on my part, this is what I learned about their dough and pizzas:

Flour/Dough. The flour is a high-gluten proprietary flour produced exclusively for Grimaldi’s but sourced through Roma, a VISTAR foodservice subsidiary located in Tempe, AZ. Some time ago, when pizzagirl posted in this thread on one of the Arizona Grimaldi’s, I saw the Grimaldi flour listed at the Roma/Tempe website at http://www.vistarvsa.com/tempe/products.cfm?keyword=flour&ptype=search&dist_id=12. I spoke to a Roma rep in Dallas not too long ago who was not familiar with the Grimaldi's flour per se but said that it was common for them to carry products like that along with other pizza ingredients that a customer like Grimaldi's might decide to purchase from them. I was told that proprietary flour blends can be created with all kinds of variations, including type of wheat to be used (e.g, hard red spring wheat), types and amounts of additives, conditioners, etc.

To determine the thickness of the skins made by Grimald’s, I asked the manager what amount of dough was used to make an 18” pizza (their largest size). He didn’t know the answer but went into the kitchen to find out. As I waited, I guessed 14 ounces based on looking at the dough balls in the make line area. When the manager returned, he said 14 ounces, confirming my guess. Based on that weight, I calculated a thickness factor of 0.055. I suspect that the same thickness factor applies to the other Grimaldi’s pizza sizes as well. The Grimaldi’s dough is made in the evening (using one of the larger size Hobarts), and cold fermented for close to 24 hours (I was told that it is actually less than 24 hours). When ready to be used, the dough balls (warmed up) are dropped into a container of flour, initially pressed with the fingers to several inches, stretched further by using the palms while turning the skins (a common technique), and then stretching and tossing. Clearly the skins had a good gluten structure. The pizza makers I observed were able to toss and spin the skins on one finger.

Yeast. The yeast used to make the dough is fresh yeast. The manager said he didn’t know for sure but added that the yeast came in blocks, which ruled out dry yeasts. (It later occurred to me that the block could have been a vacuum-packed bag of dry yeast that looks like a block.)

Cheese. I was told that the mozzarella cheese is a fresh mozzarella cheese sourced out of NY by Aiello. The Grimaldi’s menu says that the cheese is made from milk of “free range cows”. After doing some research, the closest I could come as a possible source is the Aiello Cheese Company in Brooklyn (possibly http://www.findownersearch.com/owner-keith-aiello-2592461.html), which is where the original Grimaldi’s is located. I did not find a website for Aiello but I exchanged voice mails with an Aiello employee who said that they did not source anyone in Arizona to the best of his knowledge but it is possible that one of their customers did. This may shortly be a moot point since I have read that Grimaldi’s is looking to buy a cheese company. The only other cheese I saw at Grimaldi’s was ricotta cheese from Polly-O.

Sauce. The pizza sauce used at Grimaldi’s is based on pureed Carmelina San Marzano tomatoes. As noted at the Carmelina website, at http://carmelinabrands.com/index.php?page=san-marzano, their “San Marzano” tomatoes are not of the DOP type but are nonetheless believed to be of high quality. The Carmelina website has a link to some retail sources for their tomatoes. I could not detect a lot of herbs in the sauce. It seemed to be quite basic, although there appeared to be too much salt in the pizza I had.

Pepperoni: Since I ordered a pepperoni pizza (18”), I checked out the pepperoni. I did not think to ask the brand, but the slices were smaller and thicker than most pepperoni slices I use (e.g., Hormel). The menu lists Hormel as a supplier so it is possible that the source of the pepperoni is Hormel but with a smaller, thicker cut.

Oven. The Grimaldi coal-fired oven is typically stoked to achieve a temperature of around 1000 degrees F. However, based on the pizza I had the temperature was lower, resulting in low degree of char. The manager said that during the peak times the temperature of the oven gets down to around 700 degrees F because of the increased volume of pizzas.

An interesting piece of information I got from the manager is that all of the Grimaldi’s locations use the same ingredients for their pizzas and from the same sources. I was told that Grimaldi’s wants their pizzas to be the same no matter where they are sold. I did not think to ask whether that comment covered the Brooklyn Grimaldi’s.

It strikes me that the members who have LBE or 2stone units or modified-clean cycle ovens (or high-temperature wood-fired ovens) should be able to come up with something close to the Grimaldi’s pizza. I think a basic NY style dough, such as the Lehmann dough, but without oil or sugar, a hydration of around 58% (or higher for old master elite authenticity), and using a thickness factor of 0.055, should come pretty close. I would recommend using a good high-gluten flour such as All Trumps, Kyrol or KASL. The yeast can be cake yeast, but it is easy enough to substitute ADY or IDY. FWIW, the Grimaldi pizza sizes are 12”, 16” and 18”. For the 2stone and maybe the LBE, the 12” size would seem to be the size to use.

Peter

EDIT (3/8/13): Updated the Carmelina link.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2013, 08:32:25 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline jkandell

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2008, 02:27:04 PM »
I would not be surprised if there is no olive oil in the sauce though.

There is nothing wrong with using a "plain" sauce, as the Italians do.  But then your tomatoes have to be top quality, since they carry the sauce.  Grimaldi's tomatoes were just not very good.

Quote
The whole chain of Grimaldi's confuses me.  They have 3 locations in AZ, whatever is in New York.  Hoboken, and then Brooklyn Pizza in Hackensack and Ridgewood, NJ.   Do Grimaldi family members actually work in all of these locations?

In Phoenix, the son of Griamaldi's co-owner (not in his family) manages at least one, but I couldn't tell in Tucson. There was an east-coast sort of woman walking around talking to the customers like she was the manager.  I did notice that one of their pizzaioli was "stolen" from a VPN certified establishment in town named Vita Amore.  This dude is adept at stretching the dough, and comes out and puts on a show flipping it behind his back and all around his body at high speeds.  They said he'd won some national awards, but I didn't catch his name. 

Offline BenLee

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2008, 01:35:15 PM »
To me this pizza looks almost too thin like it's getting dry and crackery - at least from the pics.

I would not be surprised if there is no olive oil in the sauce though.

The whole chain of Grimaldi's confuses me.  They have 3 locations in AZ, whatever is in New York.  Hoboken, and then Brooklyn Pizza in Hackensack and Ridgewood, NJ.   Do Grimaldi family members actually work in all of these locations?

Grimaldi's has changed.  The brooklyn bridge and hoboken locations are no longer run by family.  I have no clue about the ones in Arizona.  I doubt it.  However, Brooklyn's isn't part of Grimaldi's.  They were Patsy Grimaldi's nephews and started their own chain.  They still run the ones in Hackensack and Ridgewood.  I actually prefer Brooklyn's in Hackensack over Grimaldi's.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Patsy Grimaldi's - Arizona
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2008, 02:40:30 PM »
BenLee,

I linked the operations in the northeast with the Grimaldi's outside of the northeast only because of the link at the bottom of this page: http://www.grimaldis.com/.

Peter


 

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