Author Topic: Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes  (Read 8792 times)

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Offline Antonio

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« on: September 12, 2006, 04:13:25 PM »
Pete,

I have looked through the A16 thread to find Caputo 00 dough recipes and became overwhelmed by the size of the thread. Which caputo flour dough recipe have you found to give you the best results? I have been using the following recipe which I found on this forum, most likely posted by you ;-) until I get the Caputo flour from PennMac

•   1 teaspoon active dry yeast
•   1 1/4 cups warm water (105 to 115 degrees F)
•   1 cup cake flour (not self-rising)
•   2 1/2 to 3 cups all-purpose flour
•   2 teaspoons salt
•   Olive oil for the bowl

Can you point me to the thread/reply that has the caputo dough recipe or reply to this? I am looking for a recipe that will yield the same amount as the recipe above, made with only Caputo and is in a lbs./cups/oz. format. I am using a baking stone in a home oven cranked to 550, so I don't know if you have an altered recipe that compensates for cooking in a home oven, using a basic stone.

I know you have probably cycled through this question many times, but I would truly appreciate your help.

Thanks,
Antonio
« Last Edit: September 12, 2006, 04:18:51 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2006, 04:53:49 PM »
Antonio,

I have made and reported on so many different Caputo doughs that I can't remember them all anymore. The recipe you posted is one that is intended to replicate a dough using 00 flour. It can be used for a same-day, room-temperature fermented dough or it can be cold fermented. The A16 thread is devoted primarily to a cold fermented dough. Is there a particular version that you are interested in, that is, a same-day, room-temperature version or a cold fermented version?

Peter

Offline Antonio

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2006, 01:15:22 AM »
I figured you may not be able to remember all of them anymore, or at least recall where they were posted. The recipe I mentioned was intended for same day, room temperature fermented dough, so I could bake it the same day. It came out well, but I now want to move toward using Caputo Flour.

Since my post this morning, I found a recipe that you posted and I had printed some time ago. I did not have Caputo at the time and used bread flour in its place. It came out OK, but took too many days to rise, since it was cold fermented dough and the crust was too yeasty and crackery. I also cut the recipe by half and I believe the yeast was not enough after that since that required 1/16 of a Fleischmann cake. Below is the recipe that I used for that particular recipe, but did cut it in half.

1 kg. Caputo 00 flour (blue) = 2.2 lbs. = 35.20 oz. (100%)
1/2 liter water = 500 ml. = 500 g. = 17.65 oz. (50%)
25 g. sea salt = approx. 1 oz. = approx. 5 teaspoons (2.8%)
2 g fresh yeast = approx. 0.07 oz. = approx. 1/8 of a cake of Fleischmann's fresh yeast (0.20%)

What was your success using the recipe above?

In short, a great recipe for both a same-day, room-temperature version and a cold fermented version using Caputo with either fresh or dry active yeast being used.

- Antonio

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2006, 01:51:19 PM »
Antonio,

The Caputo dough formulation you posted originally was given to me by the importer of the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and was first presented here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,783.msg7219.html#msg7219 (Reply 10), and expanded upon here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,783.msg7236.html#msg7236 (Reply 13). I am fairly certain I tried the dough formulation but scaled down to a single dough ball size.

In re-reading the recipe today, it is unlikely that I would use it again. First, it is a recipe intended for commercial production and very high temperature ovens, and not for home use (which means the recipe would have to be modified for home use), and, second, the hydration, at 50%, would be much lower than I would use today after having experimented with the Caputo flour since I posted the above replies. Even pizzanapoletana (Marco) acknowledged that the 50% hydration figure was too low (Reply 18, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg11798.html#msg11798). Today I would use closer to 60%, although I sometimes have used around 57%, which is roughly at the top of the absorption range specified for the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour.

As for some recommended Caputo 00 Pizzeria dough recipes, you may want to consider the following:

In terms of a cold-fermented Caputo 00 dough, you might consider the dough formulation set forth at the A16 thread at Reply 62 at page 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg12549.html#msg12549. For instructions, you may want to use those set forth at Reply 71, at page 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg12884.html#msg12884, as later modified at Reply 265, at page 14 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg25141.html#msg25141. As you can see from all of these posts, the A16 effort was a collaborative effort over a fairly long period of time involving several of our members.

Another possibility for a cold-fermented Caputo 00 dough is this one: Reply 62, as noted above, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg12549.html#msg12549, as modified at Reply 250 to make Pizza #3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg23927.html#msg23927.

There are also a few cold-ferment Caputo dough recipes you may want to consider that I have not personally tried but were successfully practiced by others and have dough formulations that I am confident will work. These include: Reply 37, Pizza #2, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg12050.html#msg12050 (Note: the yeast quantity is about 1/2 t.); Reply 133, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg13499.html#msg13499; and Reply 274, and associated Reply 277, starting at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.msg25344.html#msg25344.

As for same-day, room-temperature fermented Caputo doughs, you may want to take a look at this thread in general: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2088.msg18383.html#msg18383. I cannot say that I have been particularly enthralled by any of the same-day Caputo doughs I have made, perhaps because they donít compare as well against the other versions of Caputo doughs I have made. So, it is not a matter of whether they are any good, only that there are better versions, especially those using natural preferments, which you did not specifically ask about. That said, you may want to consider the same-day Caputo dough as described starting at Reply 41 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2088.msg24244.html#msg24244, and the following posts including Reply 51 that includes the dough formulation used. I did not personally try the last recipe, although I was involved in it from the planning side.

As you review the dough formulations referenced above and as you make Caputo pizzas at home, I would like to leave you with a few closing thoughts. First, the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour is not well adapted to use in a standard, unmodified home oven. It shines in very high temperature ovens. You can get fairly decent results using a home oven, but they wonít be anything like you would get in a high temperature oven. Second, donít be afraid to use thicker doughs/crusts and smaller pizza sizes than may be specified in particular recipes. Most Caputo dough recipes call for thin crusts and people following such recipes tend to bake their Caputo pizzas until the crust turns the desired shade of brown. Usually, that turns out to be too long and the crust turns out hard and cracker-like. So, donít be afraid to use a thicker dough and a smaller pizza size than specified. If you can handle bakerís percents, you should even be able to design the dough to have whatever thickness and pizza size you desire. Also, I think it is much better that the crust coming out of a home oven to be soft, even if this means the crust color will be lacking because it wasnít baked too long. Third, consider using oil in the dough when using a home oven, along with hydration levels below 60%, especially if you decide you want a thin crust. Fourth, experiment with oven configurations to increase the chances of getting better oven performance. This may mean using more than one pizza stone, tiles, broilers, and other related techniques. Several of these measures have been described in several of the posts referenced above.

If you need additional assistance, or you would like help in designing your own dough, let me know and I will do my best to help you. In the meantime, I wish you luck.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 11, 2008, 10:23:38 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2006, 06:11:51 PM »
Antonio,

If I had thought of it earlier, I would have mentioned some dough clone formulations I experimented with recently as part of my efforts to reverse engineer the dough that Dom DeMarco uses at DiFara’s. These dough formulations include a combination of Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and King Arthur Sir Lancelot (KASL) high-gluten flour. All but one of the doughs were fermented entirely at room temperature.

I believe that several of the dough formulations I finally ended with are actually an improvement over the 1-2 hour dough that Dom DeMarco uses at DiFara’s, mainly because of the much longer fermentation times. What Dom has that I don't have is a high-temperature oven. I reported on the experiments starting at Reply 130 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,504.msg28423.html#msg28423, and Reply 138 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,504.msg28531.html#msg28531.

As noted in the posts referenced above, my favorites among those tried were Pizza 1 (shown in Replies 132-134), Pizza 4 (shown in Replies 135-136), and Pizza 5 (shown in Reply 138). The dough for Pizza 1 was subjected to a combination of room temperature and cold fermentation, and the doughs for Pizzas 4 and 5 were subjected to only room temperature fermentation. Pizzas 1 and 4 used a 75/25 ratio of Caputo 00 flour and KASL, by weight, and Pizza 5 used a 60/40 combination. My overall favorite was Pizza 4.

While I provided baker’s percents for all of the ingredients needed to make the doughs, I did not specify the actual quantities. However, using the dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html, I was able to enter the data and come up with the following dough formulations for Pizzas 1, 4 and 5:

Pizza 1
Flour (100%):† † † † † 117.6 g† |† 4.15 oz | 0.26 lbs (Note: 3.11 oz. Caputo & 1.04 oz. KASL)
Water (60%):† † † † † 70.56 g† |† 2.49 oz | 0.16 lbs
Oil (0%):† † † † † † † † † 0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Salt (2%):† † † † † † † † 2.35 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
IDY (0.83%):† † † † † † 0.98 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.32 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Sugar (0%):† † † † † † †0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Total (162.83%):† † †191.49 g | 6.75 oz | 0.42 lbs | TF = 0.086

Pizza 4
Flour (100%):† † † † † 117.73 g† |† 4.15 oz | 0.26 lbs (Note: 3.11 oz. Caputo & 1.04 oz. KASL)
Water (60%):† † † † † 70.64 g† |† 2.49 oz | 0.16 lbs
Oil (0%):† † † † † † † † † 0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Salt (2.4%):† † † † † † †2.83 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.51 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
IDY (0.25%):† † † † † † 0.29 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.1 tsp | 0.03 tbsp
Sugar (0%):† † † † † † †0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Total (162.65%):† † †191.49 g | 6.75 oz | 0.42 lbs | TF = 0.086

Pizza 5
Flour (100%):† † † † † 117.01 g† |† 4.13 oz | 0.26 lbs (Note: 2.48 oz. Caputo & 1.65 oz. KASL)
Water (61%):† † † † † 71.38 g† |† 2.52 oz | 0.16 lbs
Oil (0%):† † † † † † † † † 0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Salt (2.4%):† † † † † † †2.81 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
IDY (0.25%):† † † † † †0.29 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.1 tsp | 0.03 tbsp
Sugar (0%):† † † † † † 0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0 tsp | 0 tbsp
Total (163.65%):† † †191.49 g | 6.75 oz | 0.42 lbs | TF = 0.086

Peter

Offline Antonio

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2006, 02:32:44 AM »
Pete,

Thank you so much for all the information and assistance you have provided. I will check all those links and collect the recipes and begin experimenting. Thanks again for taking the time to provide this information. I look forward to trying these dough recipes,


- Antonio

Offline gschwim

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2006, 07:54:16 PM »
I'm still experimenting, but so far, I've had very satisfactory results using Pete-zza's suggestion of 75% Bel Aria 00 flour (which is readily available here in NYC) and 15% King Arthur bread flour.† The dough was easy to handle and puffed up beautifully.† I baked it in a Deni Pizza Bella, which gets up to 625 degrees, but unfortunately it has been discontinued (maybe one is available on Ebay).† Next time, I'll try the standard oven-and-pizza stone method, just as an experiment, but I anticipate that the 85/15 Bel Aria/KA combo should work fine.

Incidentally, included in my recipe were (extra virgin) olive oil and dairy whey.

Gene

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2006, 08:38:12 PM »
In due course, I plan to add more Caputo and similar 00 dough recipes to this thread, if for no other reason than to keep them all together and maybe make it a bit easier for others to identify 00 recipes they can use--hopefully with success--in a home oven environment. I will only post the recipes that I thought at the time were very good, whether I or someone else I collaborated with actually made the pizzas. It will take me a while to do this since I will have to reread the threads where I posted. I did part of this yesterday to respond to Antonio's request, so there are only a few more major threads I will have to revisit. My plan is to add the recipe Gene mentioned.

For now I will mention these two additional 00 dough recipes based on using a natural preferment:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2951.msg25809.html#msg25809 (Reply 43), and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,986.msg25807.html#msg25807 (Reply 94).

I have singled out these mainly because of the dough making technique, which has become my standard one for doughs using 00 flour and natural preferments. As will be noted from looking at the above posts, the first one involves using the San Felice 00 flour, and the second one involves using the Caputo 00 flour. The broader significance is the use of natural preferments, which I believe produce the best 00 crusts from a flavor and texture standpoint.

Other members should, of course, feel free to add their own best 00 dough recipes. I believe that Antonio is considering recipes for standard home oven use, so for purposes of this thread it may be most useful to post 00 dough recipes intended for use in an unmodified home oven environment. I would be nice if someone decides to start a new thread to post 00 dough recipes that perform exceptionally well in a high oven temperature environment. In actuality, many of the recipes will be the same or similar.

Peter


Offline REMOISE

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2006, 03:22:12 PM »
Here are some photos taken using the 00 caputo flour recipe on this post.The dough was very wet and the oven(wood burning) very hot.I used san marsano tomatoes and bufalla mozzarella and freshly cut basil from my plant...the best olive oil I could get my hands on.The result was really worth it.I used overnight fermantation and 2hour counter rise before cooking.I think this come closest to perfection compared to the others i have made in the past.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2006, 03:28:23 PM by REMOISE »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2006, 04:30:22 PM »
REMOISE,

For the record, can you tell us which specific Caputo recipe you used?

I agree that the pizza looks quite delicious.

Peter


Offline shango

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2006, 10:24:59 PM »
Nice, even if it's a little small in diameter.  (The pizza!!)

Dough depends as much on where you make it does as whose recipe you follow...

pizza, pizza, pizza

Offline David

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2006, 10:30:15 PM »
Nice.Looks like you got a nice balance on the toppings.
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline REMOISE

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2006, 04:56:02 AM »
I doubled the pizza 1 recipe on this thread.I kneaded the dough for 5 minutes using the kitchen aid then i let the dough rest about 20 minutes and kneaded an additional 2 minutes and bulk rise in the frigde and devide the following day into tight balls and let it rise 2 hours and shape and bake.I was really careful not making it too thin that is why it maybe about 10 inches in diameter.I feel when it is too thin the crust ends up all soggy.I bake my pie for about 3 minutes my wood burning oven is really hot as you can see from the pics the dough is really chared.I had the oven firing up for 3 hours just to be sure.

Offline scott r

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2006, 01:06:15 PM »
remoise, that pie is really beautiful.

If you feel like experimenting try a longer knead (at least 15 minutes) up front and a shorter one after your riposo (less than one minute) and report back.

Offline REMOISE

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2006, 12:43:15 PM »
scott r
thanks for the compliment wow beautiful....Believe me I hade so many ugly ones but thanks to this forum I have finally made a beautiful pie.I will try and experiment on your recommendation.15 MINs kneading and reposo and just 1 min more of kneading will report back on tuesday(that is our official pizza night at home).
Remoise

Offline Lido

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Re: Caputo 00 Dough Recipes
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2006, 01:05:49 PM »
So, how did it go? :)
- Lido


 

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