Author Topic: Altitude  (Read 2175 times)

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Offline LMU Pizza Man

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Altitude
« on: May 02, 2004, 07:36:12 PM »
I'll be ending school soon and heading back home. I live in Lake Tahoe at 6200 feet. Does anybody bake at altitude? What results should I expect? How do I compensate? I hear baking pizza at altitude makes it very difficult to get good results. Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.


Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2004, 01:09:30 AM »
I had thought that the added height decreased the ability of the dough to rise properly in some way.

I think that you are supposed to increase you yeast amount, or just the rise time.

Don't quote me on this, it may have been just some pizza related dream I once had. ;D
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

Offline Pierre

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2004, 03:29:58 PM »
actually, it should be the other way around, i.e.:

as a weather balloons rises to higher altitudes it's volume increases, since the surrounding air pressure is lesser in higher altitudes.

take a look at this link:

http://kids.earth.nasa.gov/archive/air_pressure/balloon.html

 ;) LMU,    you may have to tie down that pizza  ;D

My guess is though that the dough will rise faster than usuall but not much more than usuall. While baking the gluten will probably "colagulate or stiffen" just as quickly as at sea-level.


Lake Tahoe....  must be beautiful up there??

Pierre

Offline Pierre

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2004, 04:24:00 PM »
just found some more info on this subject at the Pillsbury site:

http://www.pillsburybaking.com/bakersCorner/tTip.aspx?id=99

they give some tips for adjusting recipes at high altitudes....


Pierre

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2004, 12:57:16 AM »
New it was something like that... ;D ;D Like I said it could have been a dream. ;D

Actually I remember where I heard about it now, it was on Good Eats with Alton Brown. He talked all about what to do when you are at higher altitudes, even gave the amounts to adjust per thousand feet of elevation.

Just can't remember what he said though. ???
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

Offline Pierre

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2004, 04:01:14 PM »
LMU, are you up at Lake Tahoe already?

Have you tried your recipes there and made some adjustments? Let us know if you noticed any difference in rise and texture.

I'll be heading for Bad Goisern, Austria in July, the altitude there is not near as high as in Lake Tahoe but I would be interested in knowing if your recipes turned out different at that altitude.

I'll be making some Pizzas there as well.

Pierre

Offline LMU Pizza Man

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Re:Altitude
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2004, 11:34:52 AM »
I won't be up in Tahoe till after my trip to europe, hopefully I can use some of my newfound techniques from naples to turn out some good pizzas. Get back to you by the end of june.

Offline Lars

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Re: Altitude
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2005, 03:07:31 PM »
I'm going to Mexico City (altitude 7400 feet), and I was considering making pizza there (again).  I did this once before without consideration to the altitude, and the dough rose all over the place!  It was reminiscent of when Lucy and Ethyl decided to go primitive and bake their own bread.

The Pilsbury site mentions adjustment for baking powder, but does not say anything about yeast.  I would be interested in hearing first-hand accounts of baking pizza at high altitudes, but I'll also try to do some more research on my own before I go.  I will probably take a few ingredients with me, like some good canned tomatoes, although it is easy to get good fresh tomatoes there.  I've generally used Mexican cheese as a sub for Mozzarella, and their string cheese works pretty well, but the cheese may be one of the reasons pizza in Mexico City is a bit off.


 

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