Author Topic: Course sea salt5  (Read 1511 times)

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Offline barrelli

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Course sea salt5
« on: September 14, 2006, 10:54:52 AM »
I saw some coarse sea salt from Sicily in an import store. If I use it only in NY style pizza dough, will there be any differences in using coarse sea salt instead of fine sea salt?

Lou


Offline varasano

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Re: Course sea salt5
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2006, 11:20:07 AM »
It's ok to use coarse salt. I use either coarse sea salt or coarse kosher salt

Offline scott r

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Re: Course sea salt5
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2006, 11:36:31 AM »
If you are measuring by weight it will not make a difference, but if you are using a measuring spoon remember that you will need a little more of the coarse salt.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Course sea salt5
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2006, 01:16:24 PM »
I put together a list of what one teaspoon of several types of salts weighs:

1 t. table salt (in the tubular container) = 0.196875 oz.
1 t. Morton's "coarse" Kosher salt = 0.1693122 oz.
1 t. Diamond Crystal Kosher salt = 0.102882 oz. (courtesy of member ghost)
1 t. fine sea salt = 0.209375 oz.
1 t. coarse sea salt (La Baleine) = 0.2116402 oz.

Except for the Kosher salts, the salts weigh pretty much the same and you will be hard pressed to measure out a teaspoon of any of the salts exactly. I might add that I discovered that there are several gradations of "fine" and "coarse" salt. My coarse sea salt (the Le Baleine, from France) is like a bunch of little rocks. I crush them in a mortar and pestle before using.

Peter




Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Course sea salt5
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2006, 07:44:37 AM »
Pete,

Where do you find the time to break down recipe portions, answer questions here, make pizza, and now measure out salt portions.

Who are you?  ;)

Tim

Throw me a slice, won't ya

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Course sea salt5
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2006, 11:44:04 AM »
Tim,

LOL....

The reason I came up with the list of salt conversions was to be able to use them with baker's percents to convert small amounts of different salts to volumes. Otherwise, you would need a special scale capable of weighing small quantities of lightweight ingredients. Originally I used a calculator to do the conversions but have since programmed many of the conversion factors into a spreadsheet, which now automatically does all the weight-to-volume conversions for ingredients like salt.

Peter


 

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