Author Topic: Organic San Marzanos  (Read 807 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 11729
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #40 on: July 26, 2014, 09:06:05 AM »
Speaking of indeterminate, when I pulled out my tomatoes last week, I had Sweet 100 vines that measured 12'
« Last Edit: July 26, 2014, 09:21:37 AM by TXCraig1 »
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21239
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #41 on: July 26, 2014, 09:18:13 AM »
It might be too late for your area Norma, but why not start some anyway?  I'll have plenty of seed for spring...and you can start them in peat pellets and seed trays in time for an early spring planting.

stonecutter,

I have no problem with starting some of your seeds now.  Do you recall how long it was from the time you planted the seeds in peat pellets until you had ripe organic San Marzanos?  I will save some of your seeds for a early spring planting.

Thanks again!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online reeter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 47
  • Location: Seattle
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #42 on: July 26, 2014, 02:26:35 PM »
http://www.garden.org/articles/articles.php?q=show&id=68

http://bonnieplants.com/2011/07/tomato-plants-not-setting-fruit-heres-why/

Even though I do not know a lot about pizza, except that it is good, even when it is bad, I can be a pretty decent gardener when I put my mind to it.  I knew both of the above about tomatoes and thought I would let you all know, too. Bees, or lack of, can be a factor, but temps in other parts of the country contribute.  Even though I know all this, I still am getting the blossom end rot on my San Marzanos.  This is the first year I have grown them, but, I bastardized an Earth Box, no bottom plate, water wicking soil and no top cover.  So I have to water them deeply. every. single. day.  2 plants in there and they are going totally nuts, not sure what I will do to tie them up.  Being this is Seattle, they will probably go fairly late in the year.  In the past I have had cherry tomatoes get so top heavy they blew over in a good breeze, and they were is a good sized pot.
reeter

Offline JD

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 967
  • Location: NE Mississippi, but NY born & raised
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #43 on: July 26, 2014, 04:32:28 PM »
I agree with both articles. This year has been especially challenging for me due to weather, and possibly lack of bees. At the farmers market, I overheard discussions of how this year has been difficult for them too, they think it's mostly a pollination issue.

About a month or two ago my cucumbers started to flower. I noticed a couple bees going crazy for the cucumbers, something I did not notice with the tomatoes. My cherry tomatoes were flowering again around the same time as the cucumbers, and they look terrific right now with lots of fruit. I think bee's make a difference, even with self pollinating tomatoes. I've decided to grow cucumbers every year just to attract bees.

http://www.garden.org/articles/articles.php?q=show&id=68

http://bonnieplants.com/2011/07/tomato-plants-not-setting-fruit-heres-why/

Even though I do not know a lot about pizza, except that it is good, even when it is bad, I can be a pretty decent gardener when I put my mind to it.  I knew both of the above about tomatoes and thought I would let you all know, too. Bees, or lack of, can be a factor, but temps in other parts of the country contribute.  Even though I know all this, I still am getting the blossom end rot on my San Marzanos.  This is the first year I have grown them, but, I bastardized an Earth Box, no bottom plate, water wicking soil and no top cover.  So I have to water them deeply. every. single. day.  2 plants in there and they are going totally nuts, not sure what I will do to tie them up.  Being this is Seattle, they will probably go fairly late in the year.  In the past I have had cherry tomatoes get so top heavy they blew over in a good breeze, and they were is a good sized pot.
reeter

Josh

Offline stonecutter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 510
  • Location: SC
    • Old World Stone & Garden
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #44 on: July 26, 2014, 05:05:16 PM »
stonecutter,

I have no problem with starting some of your seeds now.  Do you recall how long it was from the time you planted the seeds in peat pellets until you had ripe organic San Marzanos?  I will save some of your seeds for a early spring planting.

Thanks again!

Norma

Norma,

I didn't write it down, but based on the dates of some posts on the other forum I'd say 6-8 weeks from seed to first harvest.
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/

Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob August Riis

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21239
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2014, 05:15:33 PM »
Norma,

I didn't write it down, but based on the dates of some posts on the other forum I'd say 6-8 weeks from seed to first harvest.

stonecutter,

Thank you! 

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline stonecutter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 510
  • Location: SC
    • Old World Stone & Garden
Re: Organic San Marzanos
« Reply #46 on: Yesterday at 06:21:31 PM »
The seeds went out today, everyone. Please let me know when you get them, and if they look satisfactory.  If not, I'll mail out some more.
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/

Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob August Riis


 

pizzapan