Author Topic: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....  (Read 94233 times)

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Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #125 on: June 29, 2007, 01:01:35 PM »
Even if it's for a restaurant, I don't understand the need to make more sauce than what's storable in the refrigerator.  I get nine 14" pizzas out of one batch of sauce made from 28 oz of tomato puree.

MWTC, how much sauce do you go through in a week?  Are you using a #10 can of puree only because you have to for that brand?

Maybe you could just add some alcohol (e.g. wine) to keep it from freezing. ;D

- red.november


Offline MWTC

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #126 on: June 29, 2007, 02:27:33 PM »
I found out that Gordens Food only caries the #10 can of 6 in 1.  I bought one and didn't realized how much that was, so I froze the extra that I couldn't use. I use about one 28 oz. in about a week. So three in about three weeks. I don't know how long the sauce will remain good in the fridge. (I found it to get better with age)Thats why I froze the remainder and found it watery. Prompting the original question.
 
I found a supplier about 40 miles away that supplies restaurants and they sell 6 in 1 in 28 oz. cans by the case and #10 cans by the case.  So I am deciding which size I am going to purchase. When I uses your recipe I usually do it by the small 28oz.can and found myself having to redo the recipe to often. You know all those spices can get a little time consuming to redo all the time.

After realizing that freezing isn't the way to go I will go with the case of 28 oz cans and do about three at a time. Yes, I love the sauce!!!

No, I am not making Pizza Soup or drinking it as a V8 substitute.  :-D

I'll try the addition of tomato paste tonight to the previously frozen sauce.

MWTC  :chef:

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #127 on: June 29, 2007, 02:50:05 PM »
MWTC,

If you go through 28 oz a week, I don't see why you can't just keep an entire #10 can's worth of sauce around in your refrigerator.  You're going through your sauce more quickly than I do, and I keep sauce in my refrigerator for as long as a month without a problem.

- red.november

EDIT: Of course the back of my refrigerator where I keep my sauce is around 37F.  Maybe 2-3 28 oz cans at a time would be better for you if your refrigerator isn't just above the freezing point of water.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2007, 02:54:19 PM by November »

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #128 on: June 29, 2007, 03:10:35 PM »
Hey, MWTC

You could also "par-make" the sauce if your fridge isn't as cold as red.november's...  you state your biggest problem is with measuring out all the spices.  So, why don't you spend an hour or two measuring them out, from sucrose to parsley, into individual baggies so that each baggie makes one batch of sauce, then put the sealed baggies into a tightly sealed jar.  When it's time to make a batch of sauce, all you have to do is grab a baggie and dump it into the tomatoes.  Line up 10 coffee mugs or other similar-sized containers, put a baggie into each one and start measuring... sugar into each, then kosher salt....

Sure seems like it would solve the time issue since you've settled on red.november's sauce and don't want to experiment anymore like I do!

~sd
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Offline MWTC

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #129 on: June 29, 2007, 03:21:35 PM »
sd,

Thats a good idea. The sugar and salt must be kept separate seeing that I don't MAE that portion.

I am still experimenting with other recipes. Your's is next on the list. Just went out and got the bay leafs. Still need to find/get the chunked cheese. Any recommendations?

MWTC  :chef:

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #130 on: June 29, 2007, 04:14:59 PM »
MWTC,

Glad to hear you're still planning to try my sauce!

If you grate parm or romano over your cooked pie (or spaghetti...) like some folks do, just cut off a chunk of rind which is normally too hard to grate.  It is my way of flavoring the sauce with cheese that would normally go to waste.  I buy a lot of pecorino romano because I love its salty tang... I usually use it grated in other Italian pasta dishes and save the rinds for pizza sauce (or pasta e fagioli...mmmm) where I don't want that grated cheese "grit" in my sauce.

So, my recommendation is to buy a small chunk of good, imported parm or romano and hack up the rind.  It adds a depth of flavor that is warm and wonderful.

~sd
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Offline MWTC

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #131 on: June 29, 2007, 06:07:50 PM »
~sd

I stopped by Sam's Club on the way home and bought some Argitoni Pecorino Romano imported from Italy. I now have all the ingredients for your sauce. I will make it tonight and try it after refrigeration per your instructions. I will let you know my results.

Thanks again for the recipe.  ;D

MWTC  :chef:

Offline Anis

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #132 on: June 30, 2007, 06:55:17 AM »
Even if it's for a restaurant, I don't understand the need to make more sauce than what's storable in the refrigerator. 

It's probably because it's going to be used immediately.  The pizza sauce sometimes don't reach the refrigerator.  I use 2 kilos of tomato sauce for pizza sauce (uncooked) per batch, 2-3 batches per day.  When I have some left after the day I put it in the refrigerator.  Next day I heat it up because of the gelling. 

BTW, in my experience gelling also occurs without refrigeration.  I leave some in room temp and let it sit for maybe more than an hour it starts gelling, at this point I just use a wire whisk.  But I will try the MAE to remedy this.  I use fresh garlic and onions in my sauce (pureed in the food processor with some oil before mixing it with the tomato sauce with whisk by hand), now I know that's the reason behind the gelling.  (thumbs up) :)

Will have to figure out how to set microwave to 30% power first.   :)


Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #133 on: June 30, 2007, 09:00:34 AM »
It's probably because it's going to be used immediately.  The pizza sauce sometimes don't reach the refrigerator.

I don't understand what you're addressing here.  Are you giving a reason why sauce is stored in the freezer?  I ask because that's what I was talking about in the post you quoted.  It sounds like you're giving a reason why the sauce isn't refrigerated in your case.


Offline MWTC

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #134 on: July 02, 2007, 10:58:54 AM »
Sourdough Girl,

I made your Pizza Sauce over the weekend. 

Excellent recipe. A very nice alternative to a sweet sauce. It kind of reminds me of a Lasagna Sauce. I really liked it. A sophisticated taste, excellent.  :D

I am going to experiment with it a little to see what happens. First some sugar then some cayenne pepper. Have you tried either of these. I know you don't like a sweet sauce. If you have, what quantity of either would you recommend?

Thanks again for the recipe. Good job.

MWTC  :chef:
« Last Edit: July 02, 2007, 11:33:21 AM by MWTC »

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #135 on: July 02, 2007, 08:55:18 PM »
MWTC,

Thanks for the compliments!  I'm glad you like my sauce!

You're correct, I don't like sweet sauces... if I want sugar, I'll eat chocolate!   ;)

However, I DO like spicy food, so when I make pizza with this sauce, I sometimes add hot pepper flakes right when the pizza comes out of the oven... the surface is hot and moist enough to pull some flavor out of the flakes, but not overcook them.  I usually let my pizzas sit for about 5 minutes when they come out of the oven because I really don't care for molten cheese stuck to the roof of my mouth   :'(  I also don't usually spice the sauce up because sometimes DH is not in the mood for spicy and I am, so I can just dress my 1/3 of the pie with the pepper flakes.  I don't know how spicy you like your sauce... if I were you, I'd probably start with 1/4 t cayenne and 1/2 t sugar and work up from there.  If you're more adventurous, start with 1/2 t cayenne and see how that lights you up!

~sd
« Last Edit: July 02, 2007, 09:13:37 PM by sourdough girl »
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Offline 454Casull

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #136 on: August 07, 2007, 09:55:11 PM »
Sorry if this is too off-topic, but can anybody tell me if November's #2 sauce or a variant thereof is a good spaghetti sauce?

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #137 on: August 07, 2007, 10:39:27 PM »
454Casull,
I have not tried red.november's #2 sauce, so I cannot speak for it, but I use a variation of my sauce posted on the prior page of this thread for spaghetti...  the major difference being that I put the sauce, as posted, in a pan over medium heat and add red wine, maybe 1/3 cup, and let it simmer for about an hour.  Turns out pretty tasty, at least to me.  But, spaghetti sauce, just like pizza sauce, is very subjective.  I don't like a sweet sauce (which is why I started making my own... store bought sauces all have sugar added) so, if you like a sweeter sauce or your tomatoes are too acidic, you can add a tsp or two of sugar, to your taste.

Hope this helps!
~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #138 on: January 10, 2008, 02:24:36 PM »
While looking for something else at the PMQ Think Tank, I stumbled upon the following thread regarding the treatment of dried herbs: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=3600#3600. I was particularly interested in the post by "Steve at Stanislaus", which I took to be a post from someone at Stanislaus, one of the top producers of fresh-pack tomatoes used by many pizza operators. For convenience, I have copied and pasted this post below:

Most pizzerias add dry seasonings directly to the tomatoes and let them infuse overnight in the fridge. But heating seasonings in water may help speed the process. Because the flavor in aromatic seasonings like oregano, pepper, basil, etc are oil based, a potentially more effective way is to briefly heat dry seasonings in olive oil (or other vegetable oil) before stirring through the tomatoes. If a pizzeria is experiencing sauce "gelling" (harmless thickening) or flavor souring, heating seasonings in water or oil prior to adding to the sauce can help prevent either situations.

Peter

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #139 on: January 10, 2008, 02:48:31 PM »
Heating oil in the microwave would be a potential hazard if one also added water to dissolve the water-soluble compounds.  Oil alone would dissolve less than water alone.  Alcohol would dissolve more than either.

One thing I didn't mention because I didn't know how people felt about alcohol in their sauce, is that you can use absolute alcohol instead of water and extract more in less time.  More because alcohol is a better solvent for plant resins, and less time because alcohol evaporates much more quickly.

Also, heating with oil only really makes sense if the sauce recipe calls for oil.  It's not like the oil is going to evaporate away like water or alcohol.  I find the timing of that PMQ post interesting.

Offline KoolDO

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #140 on: April 17, 2008, 06:10:24 PM »
November,
Could your recipe include red wine instead of sugar, water or red raisins.  If it could be implemented successfully how would the amount of sugar, alcohol, water, etc. in the wine be accounted for to be appropriately added into your recipe?

Thanks,
Joe

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #141 on: April 17, 2008, 07:05:47 PM »
Could your recipe include red wine instead of sugar, water or red raisins.  If it could be implemented successfully how would the amount of sugar, alcohol, water, etc. in the wine be accounted for to be appropriately added into your recipe?

First, just to clarify, I assume the water you are talking about is in addition to a paste.  I don't personally use a paste and water preparation.  I just use tomato puree.  I mentioned paste in the beginning because I figured it would be easier for people to deal with larger quantities of water, and thus some paste would be used to bring the viscosity back to puree level.  The only water I add is to the seasonings to rehydrate them.

What you're proposing is a fairly dramatic change to the flavor profile.  To answer your first question, you could throw anything you want in there but then it's no longer the same recipe with mere substitutions.  It's a different recipe.  There's nothing wrong with that, but I think the substitutions you're proposing have low parity.  Alcoholic beverages make such an overwhelming mark on the foods they're added to.  I would not be able to comment on how much red wine to add as I do not drink it, nor would I put it in my sauce.  Perhaps someone else can share how much wine they add to their sauce.

- red.november


Offline KoolDO

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #142 on: April 17, 2008, 09:13:22 PM »
Quote
First, just to clarify, I assume the water you are talking about is in addition to a paste.  I don't personally use a paste and water preparation.  I just use tomato puree.

What I meant was to put the herbs and spices into wine instead of water in the microwave to release the flavors.  Then omit the sugar because there is sugar in the wine.

Also, I have a few questions I'd like to make sure I am following your recipe properly because tomorrow I'm going to attempt your sauce.  This is the general run down.

Step1:  Take the 28 ounce can of whole peeled plum tomatoes get rid of water the tomatoes are sitting in and then cut the tomatoes open and take the seeds out.  Rinse the tomatoes.  Use the immersion blender or whatever to make it sauce.
Step 2:  Take all the ingredients you listed previously in the thread in water and microwave on 30% power assuming you have a 1000 watt microwave for 2 min.
Step 3:  Add herbs into the sauce.
Step 4: Refrigerate

When I do attempt it tomorrow I will follow it more specifically as detailed in the thread, I just wanted to make sure I have the general rundown.

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #143 on: April 18, 2008, 03:30:07 AM »
What I meant was to put the herbs and spices into wine instead of water in the microwave to release the flavors.  Then omit the sugar because there is sugar in the wine.

KoolDO,

I don't think I would have ever guessed that's what you were talking about.  There isn't that much sugar in wine.  According to UDSA SR20, a red table wine has less than 1% simple sugars.  Even dessert wines have less than 8%.  With normally only using about 11 g of water, wine isn't going to provide a substitution for sugar if your intention is to add sugar according to the recipe.  Looking back at the raisin post, I can see where you might think to add up to 24 g of water, but that was only because of how difficult it is to extract the sugar from the raisins.  You would have to add 175 g of dessert wine or as much as 1400 g of red table wine to achieve 14 g of sugar.  This is why I assumed you were talking about using paste, because without it, that's a pretty "watery" sauce.

I have mentioned using alcohol as a substitution for water in the MAE process (not the recipe) because it, like water, will mostly evaporate during and after microwaving.  You're welcome to try using red wine in the MAE process, but I would stick to a time closer to 60 seconds for a 1000 watt microwave oven.  If you have a thermometer, you can always test to see if you're reaching 160F.

- red.november

Offline KoolDO

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #144 on: April 20, 2008, 10:01:44 PM »
Ok so here's my first attempt at your pizza sauce.  I'll give you the rundown because I'd like to double check that I did the process correctly.

Step 1:  I opened and drained a can of 28 ounce can of San Marzano tomatoes leaving only the tomatoes.  I then rinsed the tomatoes under water and destemmed the tomatoes using a knife.  After that I put them into a seperate container and using an immersion blender I blended them.
 
Step 2: After blending them together I measured the mass and volume to find the density to make sure it was comparable to yours.
The volume was 324 mL.  I then weighed them and it was 321g.  So then I divided them to get the density and it came to 1.00935.
I then multiplied 1/8 times the volume units to find the amount in teaspoons.
This is what I came up with:

garlic powder 3.5g
onion powder 3.5g
salt 7g
sucrose 14g

oregano .5tsp(4 vu)
marjoram .25tsp(2vu)
parsley(didn't have any)

basil .5tsp(4vu)
tarragon .25tsp(2vu)
fennel seed .125tsp(1vu)

rosemary .25tsp(2vu)
thyme .25tsp(2vu)
paprika .125tsp(1vu)
black pepper .125tsp(1vu)

Step 3: First I added the sucrose and salt to the sauce and whisked. I put the herbs in spices into a container mixed them around then added them to a pryrex cup and moistened them with water.  I then microwaved them cup at 30 % power in my 1000watt microwave for 2 min.  After I added them to the sauce and whisked.  The final step was to refrigerate for 6 hours before I added it as topping to my first NY ELite attempt(which came out very well, which I will be posting when I have more time)

Results:  I think I screwed something up because I think there was to much onion and or garlic powder, the sauce came out kind of a pinkish color rather
than red.  I think what happened was that i wound up discarding some of the tomatoes because I didn't like the way they looked, leaving me less sauce. 
The overall density was 1.00935 versus your 1.053.  It also did'nt look like it would make 9 14" pizze.  So what I did was open another can and added more tomatoes and repeated the process but this time I didn't add any garlic or onion powders and added it to the mix.  After I made this adjustment the sauce tasted really good.  I got a lot of compliments from family and friends particularly on the sauce.  Anyway, if you see any way that I managed to screw up your sauce or have any suggestions please let me know.  Also, I could not find any tomatoes that don't contain any citric acid or salt, and I have searched high and low.  I'm curious as to which tomatoes that you use that don't have anything in the can other than the tomatoes and the puree and that you can recommend.

Thanks a lot, I really enjoyed your sauce and I also really enjoy your posts as well.
-Joe
« Last Edit: April 20, 2008, 10:05:59 PM by KoolDO »

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #145 on: April 21, 2008, 08:03:57 PM »
Joe,

The sauce should obviously not be pink.  Other than getting messed up somewhere around your going back and forth with the tomato quantity or too much powder, I don't know what you could have done to cause it to turn pink.  I'm sure you'll have a better idea of what happened if you try it again.  I'm glad you liked the sauce in the end.

I use canned pureed or boxed strained tomatoes.  The two brands available in my area are Pomi (http://www.pennmac.com/items/96) and Great Value found at Wal*Mart.

- red.november

Offline alamout

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #146 on: May 06, 2008, 11:11:54 PM »
November,
made up a jar of your sauce for some pizzas earlier this week, it's sensational!

Thanks for the MAE tip as well as the flavour profiles, makes understanding what herbs are contributing which flavours a lot easier.

It's going to go head to head this weekend with a good friend who's a big believer in cooked sauces, I'll see if I can turn him around!

One question, you said somewhere you left your sauce quite a while in the fridge? I used a jar of passata (tomato puree) for mine, and it says to use within 3 days of opening, reckon that's paranoia or am I better to play it safe.




Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #147 on: May 07, 2008, 06:52:44 PM »
I used a jar of passata (tomato puree) for mine, and it says to use within 3 days of opening, reckon that's paranoia or am I better to play it safe.

Does the jar also say to refrigerate after opening?  Setting a limit of three days in the refrigerator is absolutely paranoia.  It takes about two days for the herb and spice flavors to really infuse.  I've never actually kept sauce in my refrigerator for less than one week.  A batch of sauce usually lasts me a couple weeks.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2008, 06:54:28 PM by November »

Offline salchaa

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #148 on: February 19, 2009, 04:38:46 AM »
- November,

I am seriously following your posts, taking notes and learned lots of things from you so, thank you very very much for your every effort to share your distinguished knowledge with us. Honestly, I can not hide my adoration to you.

Nowadays, I am trying to find the best pizza sauce for my taste on my American style pizza. I tried your volume measured sauce and it was the best sauce I have tasted ever and almost perfect to me just except a little bitter taste which has caused by probably my small measuring mistakes.
 
One thing I have noticed recently while working on your pizza sauce#2 is the differences between the volume measured and the weight measured one. If I am not wrong, I understand that although you did not call it #3, you had have changed or fine-tuned some ratios clearly at your weight measured sauce recipe compare to volume measured one. Am I right?

Red November Sauce (#2)
 28 oz 11.3 NTSS (1.053 g/cc) tomato puree
 14 g sucrose
   7 g salt
3.5 g herbs & spices (see below)
3.5 g garlic powder
3.5 g onion powder
herbs & spices (dried & crushed)
  earthy component
    4 vu oregano
    2 vu marjoram
    1 vu parsley
  sweet component
    4 vu basil
    2 vu tarragon
    1 vu fennel seed
  savory component
    2 vu rosemary
    2 vu thyme
  spicy component
    1 vu paprika
    1 vu black pepper

1000.000000
tomato puree @ 1.053 g/cc
17.600000
sucrose
8.800000
kosher salt
4.400000
garlic powder
4.400000
onion powder
0.953157
black pepper
0.814342
paprika
0.536131
rosemary
0.532948
oregano
0.481703
basil
0.359930
thyme
0.323250
fennel seed
0.198253
tarragon
0.141065
marjoram
0.059226
parsley
- red.november

This time I want to make your recipe exactly same as in determined weights without any mistake but, it is nearly impossible for me to measure low weights such as 0,059226gr for parsley. So, my plan is to make a batch of everything except salt & sugar (as I guess there is no need microwave them) according to 100000gr of tomato pure. In this way, I will be able to measure even minimum weights (for instance parsley will be nearly 6gr) and keep the respected ratio. Later, when I want to make a sauce, I will just multiple the weight of my tomato pure with weights of sugar, salt in the recipe and my batch of spice and herbs then divide by 100000 to get know how much weight I should use. Do you have a better advice for me? (Sorry if I am wrong in calculation because my math is not good.)

One last question is about using "bay leaves" and very little amount of "cinnamon" in sauce. I am very interested to learn your opinions/experiences on using bay leaves which is commonly used in tomato sauces. Also one of the members on this forum mentioned that cinnamon is commonly used in Canada which can be read in here on topic,1173.msg10441.html#msg10441 (I am not allowed to give direct link)

Generally, I add 1/4tsp of garlic powder, 1/8tsp ginger to improve the yeast activity(I had read that on a website about natural addictives for doughs but I am not sure if it is really working) and add a pinch of cinnamon to create a unique taste in my 800gr pizza dough batch. However, when I tried your sauce on my dough, the final taste of pizza was bothering especially the cinnamon smell did not fit. When I bake breadsticks from my dough I love the flavour and smell of cinnamon. It also suits on a basic pizza sauce (basil, oregano, garlic, onion, pepper vs.) but there is a herb or spice disputing with cinnamon or ginger. So, in respect of your knowledge and using science on the subjects what do you advise, if I want to use cinnamon in my dough and use your sauce recipe and also give a try to bay leaves? Do you think should I leave adding garlic, cinnamon and ginger to my dough? Anyway to take a middle course?

Sorry for if was boring and thanks in advance for spending your precious time to read.

Respectfully yours,
Salchaa  :chef:

I belive one day I will open my pizza store...

Offline November

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Re: Cooked vs Uncooked pizza sauce....
« Reply #149 on: February 19, 2009, 10:53:28 AM »
I am seriously following your posts, taking notes and learned lots of things from you so, thank you very very much for your every effort to share your distinguished knowledge with us. Honestly, I can not hide my adoration to you.

Thank you.

I tried your volume measured sauce and it was the best sauce I have tasted ever and almost perfect to me just except a little bitter taste which has caused by probably my small measuring mistakes.

Bitter doesn't come from a measuring mistake.  Bitter comes from something that's bitter.  You are probably using an ingredient that's bitter.

One thing I have noticed recently while working on your pizza sauce#2 is the differences between the volume measured and the weight measured one. If I am not wrong, I understand that although you did not call it #3, you had have changed or fine-tuned some ratios clearly at your weight measured sauce recipe compare to volume measured one. Am I right?

No.  There is no intended difference between the volume measured quantities and the weight quantities.  The volumetric method of measurement for seasonings, especially herbs, leads to imprecise quantities.  The accuracy however, is the same for both for the seasonings I work with.  Not too long ago though I formalized a conversion standard for seasonings based on McCormick brand seasonings and their uniform bottle containers.  I haven't posted the conversion standard yet, but I might now since this has come up again.


This time I want to make your recipe exactly same as in determined weights without any mistake but, it is nearly impossible for me to measure low weights such as 0,059226gr for parsley. So, my plan is to make a batch of everything except salt & sugar (as I guess there is no need microwave them) according to 100000gr of tomato pure. In this way, I will be able to measure even minimum weights (for instance parsley will be nearly 6gr) and keep the respected ratio. Later, when I want to make a sauce, I will just multiple the weight of my tomato pure with weights of sugar, salt in the recipe and my batch of spice and herbs then divide by 100000 to get know how much weight I should use. Do you have a better advice for me? (Sorry if I am wrong in calculation because my math is not good.)

In theory that's a good plan.  The problem you will run into is measuring out the portions you need for each batch while having uniform distribution of seasonings.  Some seasonings are going to settle to the bottom of the container because of their density and/or geometry.  If you really want to go that route, I would suggest measuring out herbs separately from spices, and further separate seasonings that do not have similar geometry (i.e. shape, size).  Another possibility is to pre-moisten everything after measuring it out dry, creating a paste, weigh it all again, and divide the portions accordingly for individual batch sizes.  Once you add water the density increases, making it possible to more precisely measure out the amount you want for a batch.  Then just freeze the paste portions in your freezer until you need them.  The beauty behind this method is that not only are you not concerned about cell damage, you would prefer it so that the essential chemicals within the cells are more accessible.  When you're ready, microwave an individual batch portion and add it to your sauce.

One last question is about using "bay leaves" and very little amount of "cinnamon" in sauce. I am very interested to learn your opinions/experiences on using bay leaves which is commonly used in tomato sauces. Also one of the members on this forum mentioned that cinnamon is commonly used in Canada which can be read in here on topic,1173.msg10441.html#msg10441 (I am not allowed to give direct link)

I have never used bay leaves in a pizza sauce, so I have no opinion about it other than I don't like bay leaves in anything but a bouillabaisse or with a seafood dish.  I have however used cinnamon in pizza sauce before.  I use it in quantities no larger than what I would use fennel seed.

Generally, I add 1/4tsp of garlic powder, 1/8tsp ginger to improve the yeast activity(I had read that on a website about natural addictives for doughs but I am not sure if it is really working) and add a pinch of cinnamon to create a unique taste in my 800gr pizza dough batch.

For garlic that's actually the opposite of what happens.  Spices in the alliaceae family such as onion and garlic contain yeast inhibiting chemicals.  Ginger does in fact improve yeast activity.  I just never understood why anyone would want their pizza dough to taste like ginger.  Cinnamon also has antiseptic properties so it will also act like an inhibitor.  I would cut them all out unless with the cinnamon you are trying to make a cinnamon flavored dough.  For me that means dessert pizza, not tomato sauce and cheese pizza.

- red.november
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