Author Topic: Italian Oregano  (Read 14246 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2010, 02:02:26 AM »
Wanted to add my review and reccomendation of this oregano.  I received 2 pigs from Thezaman. 1 pkg will last a long time as you don't have to use much to get a strong flavor. 

I decided to compare this stuff against my kroger brand dried oregano. First off I thought the leaves on this stick oregano were a different kind of leaf but I quickly realized I was looking at all bud and very few leaves. Out of the pkg, this ganji oregano has a rather earthy smell kind of like some teas.  My kroger oregano has a stronger smell initially. That is until I crushed some up with my finger which release a rather potent oregano smell.   

I mixed equal amounts in 2 prepared sauces. I kept the spices at  a minimal so I could judge the oregano without other ccompeting flavors.  After mixing it into sauce there was no comparison.  The stick oregano was more fragrant and flavorful by far.  It's a bit pricy for oregano but well worth it IMO .

« Last Edit: May 13, 2010, 02:04:11 AM by Tranman »


Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2010, 06:43:27 AM »
I found that this Greek Krinos Oregano has a great taste.  You can just crush it with your fingers.  They sell it at our local Italian Market, but it can be purchased online. I am not sure if this is the best price though.  By crushing it, the aroma is great.  It lasts a long while.

http://www.greekinternetmarket.com/1150-05002.html

Norma
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Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2010, 08:46:33 AM »
Since I tried this Oregano I have been trying to research it.  There are over 30 types with sub species and all have different oils or combination of oils.  I purchased about a dozen different types and plan to start an Oregano herb garden to try them all out.  Oregano is perennial and should come back every year.  The stick Oregano is definitely the buds of the flower.  It is good because the buds hold the oil until crumbled so there is no loss of flavor when dried.  It also powders very fine making it easier to spread.  This Oregano and the Greek Oregano are similar but there is an added oil in the Gangi Dante.  When added to sauce they are similar but on a hoagie there is a huge difference.  I have a store that sells both and the Krinos Greek is about half the price as the GD.  The Greek when tasted direct can have a slight burning sensation on the tongue while the GD is mild.  This can be used as a plus in sauces because the Greek can give a spicy sensation in large amount without the pepper taste.  This seems to be an attribute to a strong flavored sauce that I was trying to clone. 
Please try the Gangi Dante on a roll with oil, cheese, lettuce, onion, and meat and let me know what you think.  I like to put the GD directly on the cheese and more is better.  You can also add it to sliced vidalia onions for Hoagies and let them marinate.  Also be carefull not to over cook this herb in sauces because they can loose complexity.

Bob

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2010, 10:14:34 AM »
Bob I am very impress with your oregano grow project. I do hope you are able to source the seeds for the GD or something close to it.  I have to say that I had big reservations about this oregano and was really not expecting it to be much different from regular oregano. However it is so fragrant after crushing that it permeates the sauce. I could really smell it thru the sauce.  I also sprinkled a bit on top and could smell it coming off the pizza after the bake. I'll try it on sandwiches soon and let you know.

Im hoping to dig through the buds and find a few seeds to try and grow. 
« Last Edit: May 13, 2010, 10:18:52 AM by Tranman »

Offline ninapizza23

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2010, 10:58:02 PM »
Tranman,
I saw the greek oregano plant at Trader Joe for $2.69. I haven't tried greek oregano, at least not that I know of, a bunch of sicilian oregano is $3.95 in some stores. Today I went to HFT and I saw the small submersible pump like mine for $10. Do you have a pic of your aeroponic unit?

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2010, 11:06:11 PM »
Nina I bought a Greek oregano plant from Lowes for $3.50.  On my next bake I will test the ganji Dante Italian stick oregano against the fresh Greek oregano and report back.

I'll see about posting some pics of the hydroponic drip system. I ultimately decided to go with a simpler hydro unit over aero so that I can keep it outside in the shade.

Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2010, 07:11:43 AM »
Tranman,
I also purchased the Greek from Lowes and it is doing well.  You may not be comparing apples to apples with the GD and the Krinos Greek that Norma is using.  I am pretty sure that the Lowes is close to the dried Krinos but there are two types of Greek- Hirtum and sub species Heracleoticum.  The Krinos that I purchased is all buds just as the GD.  I believe you will have to wait until Late summer or early fall to harvest.  I have also read that the strength of the oils vary depending on the growing cycle.  Keep in mind that the commercial growers must know how to get the most flavor from the GD and the Krinos.  I have read that the best time to harvest is right before they flower.

When looking for seeds in the GD it may not pay off.  If it is a hybrid between Marjoram and Oregano the seeds may be sterile.  I have read that if the seeds work they take on the characteristics of the Grandparents.  This means you may need to purchase Origanum x majoricum and propagate from that.  I have read conflicting data but I believe the one with the x is a hybrid.

Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2010, 07:54:45 AM »
Bob,

Since you studied all about oregano, do you believe this is the something like the Krinos Greek oregano.  I am still looking for seeds for the bushy Greek oregano.  This is a picture below and the website.

HERB OF OREGANO HERACLEOTICUM GREEK
http://www.seeds2yous.com

another site

http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/orivulgarehirtum.htm

Another place I was looking was on ebay.  If you put this item number in the search box, it will come up with the oregano.

ebay item number 220442961291

I too, have purchased other oregano plants that said they were Greek, but they are nothing like the Krinos. I believe that Krinos is a brand name, because Krinos also sells many other Greek food products.  I also have Mexican oregano, but that isnít the same either.  My other oregano plant keep coming up each year.

Any help would be appreciated,  :)

Norma
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2010, 08:17:44 AM »
Wow Bob, you have done a lot of homework.  I had figured it wasn't the same Greek oregano. What I'm really wanting to show (and I already know the answer) is that the GD has a better/stronger flavor than fresh oregano.

Thx for the info on the sterility of the seeds, I won't waste my time.  What would I get if I took a branch of Greek oregano and spliced it onto a majoram root stalk? Would I then get a hybrid or just Greek oregano?

Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2010, 09:09:07 AM »
Norma,
I would think that one of the two types of Hrtum is the Krinos.  Have you harvested your past Greek Oregano when budding?  They say the Greek burns the tongue and I have tried the Krinos raw and found that it does.  I do not know but a warm climate may intensify the flavors also.  I believe the heracleoticum  is the bushy type.  I have also read that it is furry because of the warm climate and has pointy leaves.  I would guess that the heracleoticum is the Krinos type. 


Tranman,
I would doubt that grafting would work.  Most Oreganos are hermaphridites.  I suppose that they cross polinate somehow to achieve a hybrid.  It is hard to compare the two types because they contain different oils and give different tastes.  If all else fails I would think that I could use a mix of different plants after harvest to imitate the GD, or at least create something else good.  The key will be to harvest at the correct time. 

Bob




 


Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2010, 10:18:03 AM »
Bob,

Thanks for your help.  I still am a little confused about the different kinds of Greek oregano.  From what I read, the O. Vulgaris, is know as Wild Marjoram with pink flowers. I donít think this has much flavor. True Greek Oregano numbs the end of your tongue and that flower is white.  I still donít know which kind to try to find the flavor of the Krinos I really like. 

I have harvested the Greek oregano when it started to flower and then dried it.  I cut the sprigs when they get around 6"-8" or they will go to seed. Cutting also helps the plants to bush out.  Any oregano is good dried.  I have to keep my parsley and tomatoes fenced, but the wild animals around my area donít eat the oregano.

I am not sure if this is the kind of oregano I am looking for. Description: A hybrid of Origanum vulgare with white flowers and a spicy tasteófresh leaves numb your tongue. Oregano is a low
grey-green perennial plant. The leaves are entire; the upper leaves are on short petioles,
the lower leaves are on long petioles. The white flowers grow in clusters at the ends of the
branches in the leaf axils. These flowers crowd together in an overlapping short head. The
whole plant is aromatic and hairy. It blooms from June to August. The leaves are fuzzy,
oval and somewhat coarse in relation to the other species. The flavor is strong, austerely
and hotly aromatic, penetrating and slightly bitter. This is the strongest flavored 'oregano'. It
is the species used for extraction of essential oils, the dried foliage having around 3% of oils,
depending on growing conditions and seedling variability. The concentration of oils is so high
that lengthy handling of large amounts of the dried product can cause irritation to sensitive
skins. It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from July to September,
and the seeds ripen from August to October. The scented flowers are hermaphrodite and are
pollinated by bees, moths and butterflies.
Cultivation: Oregano is native to Europe and naturalized in the Middle East Cultivation:
Requires a rather dry, warm, well-drained soil in full sun, but is not fussy as to soil type,
thriving on chalk. Prefers slightly alkaline conditions.conditions. Tolerates poor soils. Dislikes wet soils.

Norma
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Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #31 on: May 14, 2010, 10:56:33 AM »
Norma,
Which Greek did you plant?  I am a little confused. The sub species  Hirtum heracleoticum fits the discription you posted.  Have you used this one or the plain Hirtum

http://www.gardenbythesea.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/home.showpage/pageID/96/index.htm

http://earthnotes.tripod.com/oregano.htm

Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2010, 11:16:49 AM »
Bob,

I didn't purchase any of the Greek seeds, because I wasn't sure if they were the right kind.  The first two pictures show two types of Greek oregano, that are coming up from last year.  The last picture is of Mexican oregano that is also coming up from last year. 

Norma
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Offline ninapizza23

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #33 on: May 14, 2010, 02:19:25 PM »
Bob1,
my oregano plant looks like the one  in the picture that you posted with white flowers and it is from the same area that GD comes from. Check the benefits of oil of oregano for its many  medicinal uses . 

Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #34 on: May 14, 2010, 04:23:06 PM »
Nina,
The dried Krinos and the GD that I have both look the same however the GD is a lighter green.  I read your old post about the area and the seeds.  You also stated that the climate may be a factor.  If the GD is a hybrid as shown here at http://www.manicaretti.com/sellsheetOregano.pdf the seeds may be sterile.  Their plants are also on private land so they may not be the same as the wild Marjoram growing in the hills.  Many of these plants look similar so it's hard for me to judge.  I have read about the benefits of most Oreganos but I am most interested in the Dictamnus that the Greeks used.

Norma,
I have the Greek from Lowes (Bonnies) that just says Hirtum and not Hirtum heracleoticum and it looks like the ones in your pictures.  I also have a Hot N Spicy that may be a Hirtum.  I will post some pics tomorrow.  I have acquired many types this week including Cuban and Syrian.  It seems like the three golden type that I have are much sweeter and have a different quality that the Krinos lacks.  I am hoping that the Hot n Spicy blended with the golden will work for me when I dry them.

Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #35 on: May 14, 2010, 10:48:27 PM »

Norma,
I have the Greek from Lowes (Bonnies) that just says Hirtum and not Hirtum heracleoticum and it looks like the ones in your pictures.  I also have a Hot N Spicy that may be a Hirtum.  I will post some pics tomorrow.  I have acquired many types this week including Cuban and Syrian.  It seems like the three golden type that I have are much sweeter and have a different quality that the Krinos lacks.  I am hoping that the Hot n Spicy blended with the golden will work for me when I dry them.

Bob

Bob,

I would be interested in seeing your pictures.  The hot and spicy sounds interesting. Maybe some day I will be able to find the kind of Greek oregano I am looking for.  I did purchase the one off of Ebay, today.  ;D  Will see if I can get the oregano started from seed.   ::)  I had planned on going to the heirloom show at Landis Valley Museum last week, but I was away for the weekend.  I will have to look at some other places around here that sell heirloom plants.  We still had frost this week, so I am going to wait to plant my other herbs and tomatoes until the end of the month.

Thanks for your help,  :)

Norma
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #36 on: May 15, 2010, 01:47:43 AM »
I made 2 pies tonight testing the ganji Dante oregano against my fresh Greek oregano from Lowes. Not sure the exact strain of Greek oregano but it does sting/burn the tip of the tongue.

I know that this isn't a fair comparison but as expected the GD won hands down.  Had a stronger and better flavor than the fresh Greek oregano. You can actually smell the GD throu through the sauce whereas the fresh Greek oregano and the dry Kroger brand get lost in the sauce. 

Offline Bob1

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2010, 01:34:46 PM »
I have purchased many oreganos and Marjorams and have researched as much as I had time for.  It seems that the GD is Origanum X marjoricum also called Italian oregano.  I think this is a cross between the Greek and wild Marjoram to produce a stronger plant.  I have a few versions of the Greek Hirtum and I think the "Hot n Spicy may turn out to be the better of the Greeks.  I also have Syrian which tastes interesting.

1st pic is all
2nd is Italian
3rd is two Greeks with Hot n spicy on left
4th is Hot n spicy
5th is Syrian

Notice the Greeks look a like in leaf but the one stem is reddish.

Bob

Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2010, 01:56:14 PM »
Bob,

Thanks for the interesting information.  :)  My seeds I bought from ebay are just starting to sprout.  I think I found the right kind of Greek Oregano I was looking for, but won't be sure until the plants mature.  The one other oregano plant I purchased does smell like the Greek Oregano I was looking for, but I sure don't know at this point.

Keep us informed about your plants so we can learn more,

Norma
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Offline cranky

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Re: Italian Oregano
« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2010, 07:19:23 PM »
Bob,

Thanks for the interesting information.  :)  My seeds I bought from ebay are just starting to sprout.  I think I found the right kind of Greek Oregano I was looking for, but won't be sure until the plants mature.  The one other oregano plant I purchased does smell like the Greek Oregano I was looking for, but I sure don't know at this point.

Keep us informed about your plants so we can learn more,

Norma

Norma,
I bought a greek oregano plant years ago and put it in my herb garden.  It looks exactly like the picture.  It is like a weed.  It spreds everywhere, maybe in the area where I live. 
Bob,
I also have marjoram planted.  It does not spred like the oregano, although it looks similar.  I doubt that they can cross pollinate and produce a sterile hybrid, but I am not botanist.  If that were the case I should have seen some grow from seed.



 

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