Author Topic: old post of a pizza  (Read 3909 times)

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Offline 007bond-jb

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old post of a pizza
« on: July 13, 2006, 10:02:12 AM »
I hope moving this old post works. I posted it in the wrong area when I was new here, the post was called...Translucent pizza skin with photos
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Here's a few photos of last fridays pizzas. The sicilian style's dough was left in the fridge for a week then got thrown in the freezer for 2 weeks. After it was up to room temp. the dough was pourable not wet or sticky though. When I tried to place it on my peel I noticed I would have trouble getting off so I made & baked it on the pizza sheet. This dough hardly needed to be rolled it almost leveled itself out on the sheet! 1 photo with the flash off holding a slice up to the light you can see through it around the pepperoni. It was a crisp & delicious crust. I will make again for sure!!!! 
No pre-bake
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« Last Edit: July 13, 2006, 10:08:49 AM by 007bond-jb »


Offline Jack

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2006, 10:54:43 AM »
I've found my previously frozen dough to be almost pourable too.  While it's not a regular practice for me, the dough is not bad, if you are prepared in advance.

Jack

Online Pete-zza

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2006, 11:21:41 AM »
007bond-jb and Jack,

Since freezing a pizza dough kills some of the yeast, and more so in a home freezer than a commercial flash freezer, next time you may want to increase the amount of yeast, use cooler water, less water (by hydration percentage), and add a bit of honey. What happens when yeast is killed during freezing is that the yeast cells release glutathione, which is an amino acid, which then acts as a reducing agent and causes the dough to become overly slack and wet when the dough is defrosted and fermentation starts.

If you would like more information on this subject, I have written about it in the context of a Lehmann NY style dough at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg17428.html#msg17428.

I'd love to get some feedback if you decide to try the abovementioned changes.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 13, 2006, 04:38:26 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline 007bond-jb

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2006, 12:45:29 PM »
Hey Pete-zza read the last line in my post. My favorite style of pizza is thin & crispy thats how it tuned out. I also make other types of dough for a change now & then. I haven't tried to make a  chicago crust but I been thinking about making one soon.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2006, 01:16:14 PM »
007Bond,

Now I get you.

Since you posted under Sicilian style, I thought that was what you were aiming for.

Peter

Offline dinks

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2006, 03:44:47 PM »
PETER:
  Good afternoon. I have noticed & read your past posting on "RAW DOUGH FREEZING" with much interest. I recently had occasion to review that very subject. The only paper that I could locate on this subject is from the university of Illinois. dated 1965. I have others as well, I just saw them no more than 6 or 8 days ago & I cannot remember what I did with them. Whenever I locate them I will call your attention to them by giving you the website of the mid-western universities that have done extensive research on this subject, due to their States economic exposure to their largest cash crop, namely "WHEAT".
   
   COMES NOW:

  Unbaked yeast dough may be frozen. The best stage to freeze yeasted dough is before the final rising period. Mix & knead dough & let it rise the first time. (I assume they mean Fermentation) Punch down dough & shape into the desired shape & freeze. It may be made into nonspecific shapes & shaped after it has thawed.

   TO THAW:  If already shaped into final shape, thaw frozen dough in the cooking pan. Thaw at room temperature about 3, hours or in the refridge overnight.

   if not shaped into the final form, place in refridge to thaw 8. hours or overnight. Let the dough then stand at room temp. about 15, miutes to warm slightly before shaping.  END OF REPORT.

   Now then Peter, when I finish mixing my pizza dough I scale them into(6)  8 3/8 oz each & cover them loosely in plastic wrap & place them in the refridge for 2 hours. I remove one for my dinner that eve. & freeze 5. I have noticed over the years that after approx 3 weeks later or so, the pizza balls do not taste the same. They lose some of it's flavor. Other then that I have never had any problems freezing.

  Anyway Peter, you mention in your well-written report  beginning with the last paragraph.... 2nd sentence that upon baking you noticed that the crust had blisters.  As you know, that condition is simply caused by escaping gas from the crust.  Gas is lost more quicker in cooling dough than it is being made in the dough due to a matter of course, because cooling increases the solubility of the carbon dioxide in the water. Upon baking... the water in the crust will accumulate in   the small cells remaining & form the blistering.  No- matter some people think that condition is desireable.
   Enjoy the rest of the day young man.

  ~DINKS.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2006, 04:41:48 PM »
DINKS,

Thank you so much for the thoughtful reply and especially for referring to me as "young man" :).

Yesterday, member Lydia referred the forum to some of the latest developments in respect of freezing dough. She provided this link: http://www.lesaffre.fr/Eng/default.asp?cible=Services/s_Ressources.htm. If you click on the frozen dough article, you will be able to catch up on some of the new ideas in the area of freezing dough. As you will note, the general recommendations are to use: high-gluten flour (or supplement lower-protein flour with vital wheat gluten); a lower hydration ratio; cold water; considerably more yeast; more oil and salt; and get the dough into the freezer as soon as possible. When I made the last batch of frozen dough, I didn't increase the oil or salt, and I also added some honey. Next time, I plan to modify my procedures to incorporate the latest advice.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 14, 2006, 04:44:22 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jack

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2006, 06:22:38 PM »
My only problem with the suggestions above, is that when I am at home, we will cook up whatever dough I have made (2-4 pies), since everyone in my house loves cold pizza almost as much as fresh out of the oven.  When I cook at the pool, on a barbeque grill, I often bring 6 dough balls, so I occasionally have leftover dough.  No only is this dough not still fresh off the hook, but it's not quite cold anymore and has likely been somewhat traumatized.  I should just turn it into garlic knots, which will keep a few days, and call it a day.

Jack

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2006, 06:32:23 PM »
Jack,

My comments, and those of DINKS (a baker by training) as well, were respect to a dough that is specifically prepared to be frozen.  Like you, most people just end up with leftover dough and just decide to freeze it rather than throw it away. If you are lucky, and you use up the dough fairly soon, you might end up with something that is usable. But the odds aren't great--or at least I wouldn't want to use the dough for guests--so your idea of making garlic knots (or bread sticks) is a good one.

I was originally going to jokingly suggest to 007 that he do the exact opposite to what DINKS and I discussed. Who knows, maybe he would end up with the best thin and crispy crust he has ever made ;D.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 14, 2006, 06:39:40 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jack

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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2006, 06:43:18 PM »
Peter,

While I was very happy with the final result of the "poured in place" dough, I was not happy getting it into the oven.  That was a challenge, but successful.  Maybe it was just that it was different (texture & taste), but everyone liked it. 

Jack


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Re: old post of a pizza
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2006, 07:09:17 PM »
Jack,

I forgot to mention that a common recommendation when using leftover dough to make garlic knots or breadsticks is to par-bake them. That way, you can finish baking them when you are ready to use them. Of course, if your family doesn't mind eating cold garlic knots, then they can be fully baked.

Peter


 

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