Author Topic: Yeast Types  (Read 3116 times)

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Offline pizzabill

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Yeast Types
« on: May 20, 2004, 11:58:24 AM »

Has anyone experimented with various yeast types? I've never used anything other than Instant Dry Yeast at home, but at Pizza Outlet we used bricks of yeast that had to be hydrated.

I don't want to add the hydration steps to my process unless there's a real flavor difference.

Any opinions??

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Offline Randy

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Re:Yeast Types
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2004, 09:59:35 PM »
SAF perfect rise yeast here.
Randy

Offline nysauce

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Re:Yeast Types
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2004, 10:40:14 AM »
Pizzabill,
   Where can I buy brick yeast?

Thanks

Offline RoadPizza

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Re:Yeast Types
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2004, 12:04:48 PM »
Pizzabill,
   Where can I buy brick yeast?

Thanks

For what you plan to do (in making NY-style dough for a pizzeria), try to find Red Star.  Though it tells you that it needs to be hydrated in the instructions, it doesn't need to.

Offline pizzabill

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Re:Yeast Types
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2004, 03:42:03 PM »
Pizzabill,
   Where can I buy brick yeast?

Thanks

I've read that you can buy brick yeast at some grocery stores in the freezer section but I haven't verified that locally. I think you can also buy it at baking supply stores.

I might have to just try to get some and see what difference it makes for myself!

-PizzaBill
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Offline nysauce

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Re:Yeast Types
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2004, 10:29:05 AM »
Finally found some fresh yeast (brick yeas). I used 1/4 ounce for my recipe which uses 2.5 lbs of high gluten flour. The yeast feels like your working with play dough. My pizza video says that I can let the dough rise 1/2 hour on summer days or several hours on winter days with this yeast. Non the less I decided to still refrigerate for an overnight rise. In about 6 hours in the frig the dough was already the same size had I used dry yeast with a 16-24 hrs in the frig. The stuff works fast! I noticed my crust did taste a little better but I can't say if it was because of the yeast or because I'm learning how to be patient with the proofing, and how to bake the crust properly. Probably a little of both but more because of the latter. One mistake I did make was one of the doughs I let rise for 48 hrs and pie crust came out way to puffy. Seems like you have to use the dough more sooner if you use this type of yeast.