Author Topic: Today's Trial  (Read 3515 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 958
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Today's Trial
« on: October 15, 2006, 05:23:54 PM »
Here is a Calzone/filoscio a made today at DM
« Last Edit: October 15, 2006, 05:36:07 PM by pizzanapoletana »


Offline shango

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 344
  • Age: 41
  • Location: right here
Re: Today Trial
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2006, 05:34:54 PM »
looks great! 

pizza, pizza, pizza

Offline varasano

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 712
  • Location: Atlanta (Bronx born and raised)
  • Seeking perfection
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2006, 06:19:05 PM »
Great minds think alike. This is one of mine from last week:

Offline Kidder

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 106
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2006, 07:44:33 PM »
Both of those look great. Is it traditional to have the sauce inside or out? There's a place in the area, Flying Pizza, that has the absolute best calzones but they have the warm sauce on the side so you can pour over the calzone or dip it in the sauce. They fill it will mozzarella and ricotta plus perpperoni or sausage. I think they pour a little butter over it when they bring it to you.


Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 958
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2006, 04:14:09 AM »
Jeff,

Nice Calzone. They look very similar and that's is due to Calzone (o ripieno al forno) being baked at the "mouth" of the wood oven where it is actually cooler.

Kidder,

When baking calzone there should be a drop of sauce, a piece of mozzarella and a basil leave on the top. the filling should be ricotta, salami and mozzarella. I was just playing around while training a guy and I wanted to show him hot to make a calzone but I had already made 5 margherita and had it all on the bench, so I fold one up and let it bake on hedge of the oven opening.

Ciao

Offline Apizz

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2006, 04:43:49 PM »
Are the same ingredients used for the fried calzone? 

I know a different dough is used.

Would fried calzone be popular in the US?  I know that they are delicious and you can't go back after you try them, but how do you actually even convince customers to try a deep fried pie? 

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3063
  • Age: 43
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2006, 04:49:50 PM »
I think they use the same dough as they do for pizza in Naples?

If you search the forum Pizzanapoletana has a thread about the calzone fritte, and I also have a pic and a list of ingredients on my recent review of Il Pizzaiolo .

Offline varasano

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 712
  • Location: Atlanta (Bronx born and raised)
  • Seeking perfection
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2006, 05:29:48 PM »
I know that they are delicious and you can't go back after you try them, but how do you actually even convince customers to try a deep fried pie? 
Are you kidding? American's will eat anything fried.

Offline Apizz

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2006, 05:48:27 PM »
Are you kidding? American's will eat anything fried.

 :-D  LOL


Offline Arthur

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 253
  • When Brooklyn Was the World
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2006, 05:51:17 PM »
....being baked at the "mouth" of the wood oven where it is actually cooler.

... so I fold one up and let it bake on hedge of the oven opening.

So that amazing looking calzone is using the same pizza dough - using Caputo flour, which I'm still working on :) -  and the filling (which is what above?) just folded over and baked at the mouth of a wood oven?   How long does it bake for?

Arthur.


Offline varasano

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 712
  • Location: Atlanta (Bronx born and raised)
  • Seeking perfection
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2006, 06:06:16 PM »
Mine was about 90 seconds.

Offline shango

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 344
  • Age: 41
  • Location: right here
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2006, 06:32:55 PM »
a proper ripieno will take about twice as long as a margherita.  Ricotta cheese. 

Sometimes I make a stuffed pizza with the sauce inside (xtra sauce) pepperoni and fior di latte.

I fire it without any sauce on the outside and I don't poke a hole in it.  The steam makes it blow up really (silly) big.

I call it "The Ugly American".

It has never been, and never will be on the menu, but it is fun.

 :P
pizza, pizza, pizza

Offline DiNAPOLI

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 25
  • Location: IT CAN ONLY BE----NAPOLI
  • PIZZA E BABA
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2006, 03:52:46 PM »
a proper ripieno will take about twice as long as a margherita.  Ricotta cheese. 

Sometimes I make a stuffed pizza with the sauce inside (xtra sauce) pepperoni and fior di latte.

I fire it without any sauce on the outside and I don't poke a hole in it.  The steam makes it blow up really (silly) big.

I call it "The Ugly American".

It has never been, and never will be on the menu, but it is fun.

 :P


Why not put it on the menu...I think a calzone would be a big hit anywhere!!!

Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 958
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2006, 04:28:08 PM »
Hi Di Napoli,

Are you a VPN member from Naples?

Ciao

Offline DiNAPOLI

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 25
  • Location: IT CAN ONLY BE----NAPOLI
  • PIZZA E BABA
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2006, 11:15:55 PM »
ciao compa`
no not a VPN member....just a pizza lover like all of you!!!
 :pizza:

Offline fabio

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 95
  • Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2006, 05:10:23 PM »
FYI, if we are thinking of the same thing, a "fried calzone" is actually called a panzerotto. It may be called by different names in different regions of Italy too.

Offline Y-TOWN

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 218
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2006, 07:35:19 PM »
In my area of NE Ohio that concoction is called a panzerotti - very popular at the old-line shops.

Franchise operations and shops with younger operators don't seem to sell them - really old school in my general area.

Cheese and pepperoni wrapped in pizza dough, deep fried (about 8"'s long) for about $5 - great treat - very hard on the arteries, best consumed by the young  :-X

Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 958
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2006, 04:05:24 AM »
FYI, if we are thinking of the same thing, a "fried calzone" is actually called a panzerotto. It may be called by different names in different regions of Italy too.

Fabio,

The filling I used probably must re-asemble a panzarotto, wich is called like that in Apulia but it must be much smaller and usually made of NOT fermented dough. owever Panzarotto is something else in Naples and we do not use that name for it.

Offline fabio

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 95
  • Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2006, 01:39:03 PM »
In my area of NE Ohio that concoction is called a panzerotti - very popular at the old-line shops.

Yes, panzerotto is the singular, panzerotti is the plural.

Fabio,

The filling I used probably must re-asemble a panzarotto, wich is called like that in Apulia but it must be much smaller and usually made of NOT fermented dough. owever Panzarotto is something else in Naples and we do not use that name for it.

If I'm not mistaken a panzarotto in Naples is what I know of as a "crocche' di patate", a cylindrical shaped mass of mashed potato (with other seasonings and cheeses) coated with bread crumbs and deep-fried. But I was under the impression that a panzerotto -- note the different spelling -- was indeed what we are talking about here, albeit made with a non-fermented dough and not much bigger than your hand (as you correctly stated). Admittedly, I haven't lived in Italy for decades and I was just a "ragazzino" when I lived there, so much of my knowledge on Italian culture is second-hand, imparted from my parents and older sibblings. In other words: I'm probably wrong.  ;D

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: Today's Trial
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2006, 01:40:30 PM »
here is a Ripieno I made last night.it's not something I usually make as i'm personally not a big fan,but I had some dough leftover so i decided to play aroung with it.For some reason my dough last night was VERY puffy and not quite as extensible as it normally is?When I cut this open,there was too much dough inside IMO as I had failed to flatten the edge and left a rim before joing the edge together, aarrgghhhh next time..........
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market