Author Topic: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?  (Read 160829 times)

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Online norma427

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1860 on: November 01, 2013, 05:53:55 PM »
Oh, yes. I've been using November's site almost since the day I discovered it after joining here.

Since you were so active in this thread, and many others, I just wanted a record of which formula you liked best. Don't really know when I'll get around to making it. With your background in pizza making and all the hard work you put in here, I really respect your opinion on matters here.

Again, thanks.

Dwight,

Glad you to hear you have been using November's tools since the day you discovered them.  ;D

Thanks for your kind words.  I really don't think I had a favorite MM formulation though.  I liked most of them. 

When you get around to trying a MM clone pizza post some photos if you can.

Norma
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1861 on: April 14, 2014, 11:09:33 PM »
Well I took another crack at this dough I just wanted to add my data point to this already massive thread. I've only just started making homemade pies, to date they have all left something to be desired. I just made my second attempt at the mellow mushroom dough over the weekend and I have to say, this is the first time I've taken a bite of homemade pizza and told my self "d**n, now that's a good pizza". Not only that, but everyone told me it tastes just like MM. So for any other newbies who might be reading this thread here is what I did.

I started with Pete's MM formula #7.

I used Grandmas original molasses instead of golden barrel because I can't find golden barrel.

I used King Arthur bread flour and Hodgson Mills Vital Wheat Gluten instead of Pendleton power flour. I can't find Pendletons either. I used the mixed mass calculator to come up with a flour mixture of 13.5% protein.

On Wednesday I made my dough, divided into 4 dough balls, and went straight to the freezer.
On Saturday afternoon I moved the dough balls to the fridge to defrost and ferment.
On Sunday evening I made 3 pizzas.
On Monday evening I used my last dough ball to make a calzone.

I cooked my pies in a conventional gas oven, on the middle rack, on top of a preheated Big Green Egg pizza stone. The oven temp was 500 for the pizzas on Sunday, and 475 for Mondays calzone. 7 minutes 30 seconds was just the right time for the pizzas, the calzone cooked about a minute longer.

I used a New York style pizza sauce recipe from seriouseats.com, trader joe's low moisture whole milk mozzarella, and whatever other toppings everyone wanted. I brushed the crusts with a clarified butter and roasted garlic mixture, and sprinkled on some grated Parmesan cheese. The pizzas were great.

Some thoughts:
The dough on Monday night was allowed to rise for an extra day and was certainly much more fermented and ready to go than Sundays dough. Sunday's dough had risen just a little bit but Monday's dough was exploding out of its container. Mondays dough was also much easier to work with and stretch out. I also liked the flavor and texture of Monday's dough better. So, next time I will be allowing my doughs to rise two days in the fridge and cooking my pizzas at 475 degrees. Keep in mind that everyone's oven is different and I could have simply measured out too little yeast, your mileage may very.

I fully expected the pies to take longer to cook, though at under 8 minutes they seemed done to me. What are y'alls opinion on cook time? Perhaps we were eating undercooked pizzas and we're too ignorant to know any better?

Anyway, they tasted great and I'm happy.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 11:12:14 PM by theboozler »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1862 on: April 14, 2014, 11:30:41 PM »
Well I took another crack at this dough I just wanted to add my data point to this already massive thread. I've only just started making homemade pies, to date they have all left something to be desired. I just made my second attempt at the mellow mushroom dough over the weekend and I have to say, this is the first time I've taken a bite of homemade pizza and told my self "d**n, now that's a good pizza". Not only that, but everyone told me it tastes just like MM. So for any other newbies who might be reading this thread here is what I did.

I started with Pete's MM formula #7.

I used Grandmas original molasses instead of golden barrel because I can't find golden barrel.

I used King Arthur bread flour and Hodgson Mills Vital Wheat Gluten instead of Pendleton power flour. I can't find Pendletons either. I used the mixed mass calculator to come up with a flour mixture of 13.5% protein.

On Wednesday I made my dough, divided into 4 dough balls, and went straight to the freezer.
On Saturday afternoon I moved the dough balls to the fridge to defrost and ferment.
On Sunday evening I made 3 pizzas.
On Monday evening I used my last dough ball to make a calzone.

I cooked my pies in a conventional gas oven, on the middle rack, on top of a preheated Big Green Egg pizza stone. The oven temp was 500 for the pizzas on Sunday, and 475 for Mondays calzone. 7 minutes 30 seconds was just the right time for the pizzas, the calzone cooked about a minute longer.

I used a New York style pizza sauce recipe from seriouseats.com, trader joe's low moisture whole milk mozzarella, and whatever other toppings everyone wanted. I brushed the crusts with a clarified butter and roasted garlic mixture, and sprinkled on some grated Parmesan cheese. The pizzas were great.

Some thoughts:
The dough on Monday night was allowed to rise for an extra day and was certainly much more fermented and ready to go than Sundays dough. Sunday's dough had risen just a little bit but Monday's dough was exploding out of its container. Mondays dough was also much easier to work with and stretch out. I also liked the flavor and texture of Monday's dough better. So, next time I will be allowing my doughs to rise two days in the fridge and cooking my pizzas at 475 degrees. Keep in mind that everyone's oven is different and I could have simply measured out too little yeast, your mileage may very.

I fully expected the pies to take longer to cook, though at under 8 minutes they seemed done to me. What are y'alls opinion on cook time? Perhaps we were eating undercooked pizzas and we're too ignorant to know any better?

Anyway, they tasted great and I'm happy.
Pics would help/be very nice.
Thank you.

CB
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1863 on: April 15, 2014, 07:00:43 AM »
Well I took another crack at this dough I just wanted to add my data point to this already massive thread. I've only just started making homemade pies, to date they have all left something to be desired. I just made my second attempt at the mellow mushroom dough over the weekend and I have to say, this is the first time I've taken a bite of homemade pizza and told my self "d**n, now that's a good pizza". Not only that, but everyone told me it tastes just like MM. So for any other newbies who might be reading this thread here is what I did.

I started with Pete's MM formula #7.

I used Grandmas original molasses instead of golden barrel because I can't find golden barrel.

I used King Arthur bread flour and Hodgson Mills Vital Wheat Gluten instead of Pendleton power flour. I can't find Pendletons either. I used the mixed mass calculator to come up with a flour mixture of 13.5% protein.

On Wednesday I made my dough, divided into 4 dough balls, and went straight to the freezer.
On Saturday afternoon I moved the dough balls to the fridge to defrost and ferment.
On Sunday evening I made 3 pizzas.
On Monday evening I used my last dough ball to make a calzone.

I cooked my pies in a conventional gas oven, on the middle rack, on top of a preheated Big Green Egg pizza stone. The oven temp was 500 for the pizzas on Sunday, and 475 for Mondays calzone. 7 minutes 30 seconds was just the right time for the pizzas, the calzone cooked about a minute longer.

I used a New York style pizza sauce recipe from seriouseats.com, trader joe's low moisture whole milk mozzarella, and whatever other toppings everyone wanted. I brushed the crusts with a clarified butter and roasted garlic mixture, and sprinkled on some grated Parmesan cheese. The pizzas were great.

Some thoughts:
The dough on Monday night was allowed to rise for an extra day and was certainly much more fermented and ready to go than Sundays dough. Sunday's dough had risen just a little bit but Monday's dough was exploding out of its container. Mondays dough was also much easier to work with and stretch out. I also liked the flavor and texture of Monday's dough better. So, next time I will be allowing my doughs to rise two days in the fridge and cooking my pizzas at 475 degrees. Keep in mind that everyone's oven is different and I could have simply measured out too little yeast, your mileage may very.

I fully expected the pies to take longer to cook, though at under 8 minutes they seemed done to me. What are y'alls opinion on cook time? Perhaps we were eating undercooked pizzas and we're too ignorant to know any better?

Anyway, they tasted great and I'm happy.


raging-pizza-head,

Thanks for your detailed post! Usually a longer cold fermented dough does taste better.  It is good you could see how the different dough balls performed when cold fermenting longer after the defrost.  I am glad you had good results with using Peter's #7 formulation with Grandmas molasses, and you and everyone else thought it tasted just like an MM pizza.  The Grandma's molasses also performed about the same for me in Peter's #7 formulation compared to the Golden Barrel molasses product.

Norma
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Offline theboozler

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1864 on: April 15, 2014, 01:51:21 PM »
Sorry Chicago Bob, I didn't snap any pictures, I was busy hosting and didn't think about it.

Norma, thanks for reminding me that I'm RagingPizzaHead, that made me laugh! What is your normal cook time on your MM pies?

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1865 on: April 15, 2014, 11:19:20 PM »

What is your normal cook time on your MM pies?


RagingPizzaHead,

It been a long while since I made a MM clone attempt.  I really can not recall what my bake times were.  Since I made most of my MM clone attempts in my Baker's Pride deck oven I don't think we would have the same bake times since you are baking in a home oven.

Norma
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1866 on: April 15, 2014, 11:21:30 PM »
Around 12-14 min. at home iirc.

CB
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1867 on: August 29, 2014, 04:24:25 PM »
I ate a Mellow Mushroom pizza today and I really focused on the crust in light of this thread. My conclusion is that there is rye flour in the dough. I took a bite of the crust and it hit me - it tasted just like a light pumpernickel rye bread.  I found a light pumpernickel rye recipe (pictured below) and you already have the molasses covered. So the dough likely also has some rye flour. Not sure how much though, probably not as much as this recipe. Thoughts?




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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1868 on: August 29, 2014, 05:01:00 PM »
PrimeRib,

I really don't think there is any rye flour in Mellow Mushroom's dough.

Norma
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1869 on: August 29, 2014, 07:25:00 PM »
My reasoning for why I think Mellow Mushroom dough contains a little rye flour:

1. I grew up in Northern NJ and ate a lot of rye bread.

2. I now live in Atlanta and have eaten a lot of Mellow Mushroom pizza.

3. Based upon reading this thread, something is still missing from the most recent MM formulation.

4. MM crust is not light and airy. It is denser.

5. The MM crust is similar in color to light pumpernickel rye.

6.  MM crust tastes like light pumpernickel rye, absent the caraway seeds. 

7. Maybe the color of MM crust is solely attributable to molasses, but maybe it's not.

8. There are a lot of internet hits when searching for pizza dough and rye flour.

9. Even this site, dedicated to pizza making, has over 300 hits when searching for rye.

10.  I joined this forum for 2 purposes, one of which is to crack the recipe for the MM dough.




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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1870 on: August 29, 2014, 07:47:44 PM »
My reasoning for why I think Mellow Mushroom dough contains a little rye flour:

1. I grew up in Northern NJ and ate a lot of rye bread.

2. I now live in Atlanta and have eaten a lot of Mellow Mushroom pizza.

3. Based upon reading this thread, something is still missing from the most recent MM formulation.

4. MM crust is not light and airy. It is denser.

5. The MM crust is similar in color to light pumpernickel rye.

6.  MM crust tastes like light pumpernickel rye, absent the caraway seeds. 

7. Maybe the color of MM crust is solely attributable to molasses, but maybe it's not.

8. There are a lot of internet hits when searching for pizza dough and rye flour.

9. Even this site, dedicated to pizza making, has over 300 hits when searching for rye.

10.  I joined this forum for 2 purposes, one of which is to crack the recipe for the MM dough.
Sounds great PrimeRib....are you going to get started on this right away?   :chef:
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1871 on: August 29, 2014, 08:17:27 PM »
PrimeRib,


I think if you look at Peter's post at Reply 678 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3940.msg159660#msg159660 you will see Melody said the flour used was high-gluten flour. 

I was at a MM location and so was Peter.  I know I did not taste any rye in MM crusts.  Chicago Bob also send me dough to test.

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1872 on: August 29, 2014, 10:14:30 PM »
I think it's a combination of high gluten and rye. I will experiment over the next several weeks.

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1873 on: August 29, 2014, 10:22:09 PM »
I think it's a combination of high gluten and rye. I will experiment over the next several weeks.

PrimeRib,

Good to hear you would experiment over the next several weeks. 

I don't know if you read this whole thread.  A gluten mass test was done on the dough ball Bob sent me.  If there would have been rye in addition to high-gluten flour I think the results of the tests would have been different than what they were.  At Reply 1695 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3940.msg185307#msg185307  Peter's explains what it is like to try and reverse engineer a pizza dough.

Maybe you want to purchase a MM dough ball and try the gluten mass test yourself to see if MM might have changed their dough.

Norma
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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1874 on: August 30, 2014, 10:55:09 AM »
Out of curiosity, and to bring myself a bit more up to date on this matter, I did a search to see if I could find a connection between rye flour and the Mellow Mushroom dough. What I found was a single item, at http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g36990-d399799-r191474450-Mellow_Mushroom-Carmel_Hamilton_County_Indiana.html, in which a reviewer by the name of anthony a said: I believe MM uses a rye flour mix. Standing alone without corroboration, that would be insufficient on which to conclude that MM actually uses rye flour in their dough.

As was previously discussed in this thread, at one time MM used wheat germ in their dough. But MM subsequently decided to stop using wheat germ in its dough and, as Norma reported, we were told that MM used only high-gluten flour. But, even after MM stopped using wheat germ, some franchisees continued to report in public documents that their MM dough contained that ingredient. We never did learn why MM stopped using wheat germ. But, as a fairly costly ingredient, especially when compared with flour, that might have been the reason. Usually, companies like the pizza chains are hesitant about changing their dough formulations, for fear that their customers will react negatively to the changes. Apparently, omitting the wheat germ from the MM dough did not have that effect.

Is it possible that MM has changed its dough formulation to include rye flour? Yes, it is if MM changed its dough formulation from what we understood it to be. So, the question is how to prove it. For example, since rye flour is an allergen to some people (more on this below), and since the MM website suggests that diners alert their servers to specific allergies, I checked the allergens list at the MM website at http://www.nutritionix.com/mellow-mushroom/menu/special-diets/premium. That list replaces the previous list that is no longer available at the MM website but I was able to find it at the Wayback Machine at http://web.archive.org/web/20120526125256/http://mellowmushroom.com/public/allergens102411.pdf. Looking at either list, rye is not an ingredient on the allergens list. That led me to ask myself if MM had any items on their menu using rye flour as an ingredient. I found only one item that mentioned rye, and that was a rye hoagie roll used for the MM Righteous Portobello Reuben hoagie (http://mellowmushroom.com/corpmenu).

Since MM is sensitive to the allergens issue, I suggest that PrimeRib tell his server the next time he is at an MM location that he has allergies to rye flour and ask if that ingredient is used in their pizza dough. PrimeRib might even repeat this exercise by calling MM at corporate headquarters and asking to speak to someone who is familiar with their products and ingredients to be able to answer questions relating to allergens. As can be seen from the article at http://blogs.browardpalmbeach.com/cleanplatecharlie/2014/04/mellow_mushroom_celebrates_national_celiac_disease_awareness_month_debuts_new_gluten-free_menu.php , MM is sensitive to people with allergies and other adverse reactions to rye, among other grains.

With respect to the gluten mass test that Norma mentioned, as best I can tell, for example, from reading an article at http://www.ivannikolov.com/does-rye-bread-have-gluten/, rye flour contains a protein that includes gliadin, but that protein does not result in the formation of gluten when the rye flour is admixed with water, as is the case with wheat flour. So, if that is true, the gluten mass test would not include any added gluten from the rye flour. It is apparently the gliadin protein that some people are sensitive to. And, for that reason, people who are celiacs or are otherwise sensitive to gluten are advised to avoid rye flour.

I also did a check on the cost of rye flour relative to wheat flour, since in my experience with reverse engineering dough formulations of pizza chains there is a natural reluctance to do anything that materially raises the cost of their products, even for ingredients that are used in small quantities and whose omission might not be missed by consumers. While I do not have access to the pricing of millers of rye flours, especially in bulk quantities such as might be used by someone like MM, I see that Amazon sells a 50-lb bag of rye flour for $45 (http://www.amazon.com/Rye-Flour-Bulk-Pound-Bag/dp/B0007NG4YQ/?tag=pizzamaking-20). That is at least three times the cost of a 50-lb bag of a typical high-gluten flour. In my opinion, having rid itself of wheat germ, and the attendant costs, MM would have to have a good reason to replace the wheat germ with rye flour.

Since PrimeRib appears to be motivated to get to the bottom of this matter, I encourage him in his efforts to that end. 

Peter

P.S. In the course of investigating the above manner, I saw that MM has also updated its Nutrition information, at http://www.nutritionix.com/mellow-mushroom/portal. I was hoping to see the weights of samples of their products but, alas, that information is not provided. Fortunately, I was able to find the old MM Nutrition information, for preservation purposes, at the Wayback Machine at http://web.archive.org/web/20120105061842/http://mellowmushroom.com/public/nutritionfacts102411.pdf.

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1875 on: August 30, 2014, 03:32:09 PM »
FWIW, after my last post, I found another review, at http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g35057-d444292-Reviews-Mellow_Mushroom-Lawrenceville_Georgia.html , in which reviewer fastfxr101 alluded to the possibility that the MM crust has a "touch of rye".

Peter


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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1876 on: September 02, 2014, 03:00:56 PM »
Having recently seen that Mellow Mushroom has changed its website to include some new tools, including a Nutrition Calculator, I decided to study those new tools in greater detail. Apparently MM is using a company by the name of Nutritionix to host those tools at the MM website. With a bit of searching, I found the Nutritionix website at http://www.nutritionix.com/restaurants. Among other services, one of the services that Nutritionix offers is nutrition information for foods sold by many well knows restaurants and pizzerias. I saw that one of those pizzerias is Papa John's. To satisfy myself that the Nutritionix nutrition information on Papa John's was correct, I compared the information at the PJ website with the Nutritionix PJ information and saw that they were the same. I took that to mean that the Nutritionix nutrition information at the MM website was most likely correct. So, I started playing around with the MM Nutrition Calculator that can be accessed at the MM website at http://www.nutritionix.com/mellow-mushroom/portal.

To use the MM Nutrition Calculator, I decided to study the Nutrition Facts for a medium MM cheese pizza with six slices. After playing around with that calculator, I found that I could delete all of the ingredients that went onto a medium cheese pizza so that what was left was only the Nutrition Facts for the crust itself. That would be for the crust as baked, not unbaked. This might be strange but Domino's does the same thing. The screenshot shown below depicts the screen for the MM Nutrition Calculator as I configured it. I later found that the same Nutrition Facts for a medium crust was at the Nutritionix website, at http://www.nutritionix.com/search/item/529e7de1f9655f6d35002575. Later, I found the same information at the MM Interactive Nutrition Menu under Miscellaneous, at http://www.nutritionix.com/mellow-mushroom/menu/premium. Clicking on the screenshot below will enlarge it so that it is more easily viewed.

Armed with the Nutrition Facts shown in the screenshot, I then set about to do a large number of calculations in order to determine an MM clone dough formulation that satisfied those Nutrition Facts. Critical to that formulation was that the total water content, including the moisture content of the flour (I used 14% for this purpose on the assumption that MM uses fresh flour), the formula hydration, and the water content of the molasses, had to equal 40% of the total dough ball weight. For purposes of my calculations, I used the General Mills high-gluten bleached and bromated All Trumps flour, as given at http://www.generalmillscf.com/services/productpdf.ashx?pid=50111000, as a proxy for the MM clone dough formulation and for my calculations. For the molasses, which I decided to call the "Mystery" molasses, since we do not know exactly which brand or type of molasses MM is using, I used the standard values of a more or less generic molasses, with the following characteristics: One tablespoon weighs 20 grams, its water content is about 22%, its sodium content is about 20mg, its Total Carbohydrate value is 15 grams, and its Sugars content is 14 grams. Most well known supermarket brands of molasses meet or come very close to meeting this profile.

I examined all of the nutrients set forth in the MM Nutrition Calculator as discussed above. To get the closest and best numbers, I followed all of the guidelines given by the FDA as to rounding factors. This took a lot of work but by the time I was done I concluded that the Total Fat per slice of a medium MM crust was 1.54 grams, and that the Sat Fat per slice was 0.29 grams. These numbers were important in order to determine how much soybean oil should be used for the MM clone dough formulation. I went through separate analyses in order to determine how much salt and molasses should be used in the MM clone dough formulation. For purposes of that formulation, I used a dough ball weight of 18.27 ounces, which was the value that I used previously for MM clone dough formulations.

When the dust settled, this is the new MM clone dough formulation--which I have dubbed MM#10--that I came up with:

MM#10 Clone Dough Formulation
High-Gluten Flour* (100%):
Water (Spring Water) (50.2%):
IDY (0.60%):
Salt (1.86%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.99%):
"Mystery" Molasses (12.94%):
Total (167.59%):
309.06 g  |  10.9 oz | 0.68 lbs
155.15 g  |  5.47 oz | 0.34 lbs
1.85 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
5.75 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.03 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
6.15 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.35 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
39.99 g | 1.41 oz | 0.09 lbs (about two tablespoons for a basic supermarket molasses)
517.95 g | 18.27 oz | 1.14 lbs | TF = N/A
* All Trumps high-gluten flour is used as a proxy for a high-gluten flour, with a protein content of about 14.2%
Note: Dough is for a medium (14") MM clone pizza having six slices; no bowl residue compensation

When I completed the MM#9 clone dough formulation as given above, I did the water content analysis to determine its value relative to the total dough ball weight. I was looking for 40%. As it turned out, I hit the number square on the head--exactly 40%. Hopefully, this means that I got everything right.

Peter
 

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Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1877 on: September 02, 2014, 04:36:55 PM »
Thanks for this analysis and all the time this must have taken.  I took your suggestion in #1875 and went to MM this past Saturday night.  I ordered a pizza, pretzels and a hoagie to-go.  I inquired if there was rye flour in any of these items.  The cashier did not know, but called over the manager.  The manager whipped out a plastic laminated 8x11 sheet, reviewed it, and said “No rye flour in any of these three items.” 

On Thursday night, I made up a batch of MM#7 using Sam’s Club Bakers & Chefs Bread Flour as that is all I had.  The dough sat in the frig until Saturday night.  I cooked that dough into the shape of pretzels on Saturday night and compared that to the actual Mellow Mushroom pretzels.  I am assuming MM uses the same dough for both the pretzels and the pizza (it looks and tastes the same).  My MM#7 was (i) darker in color (I used Publix brand molasses); (ii) had less chew (due to lack of high gluten flour); and (iii) less sweet than the actual MM pretzels. 

Also, I no longer believe that rye flour is in the dough.  First, as set forth above, MM said there was not.  Second, the fresh pizza Saturday night did not taste like it had rye.  I am not sure why the MM pizza I had the previous week tasted like it had rye, possibly because it was not hot.  But I am abandoning my rye flour theory.  If anything, the crust on the Saturday night MM pizza reminded me of a bagel.  That caused me to look up the ingredients for an Einstein Brothers plain bagel (whether these are “real” bagels is an argument for another thread!).  I chose Einstein because unlike real NYC plain bagels that are white, Einstein plan bagels have a color similar to MM crust. 

The ingredients for a plain bagel at Einstein is as follows:  “Plain Bagel (enriched bleached flour (wheat flour, malt barley flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, high fructose corn syrup, salt, yeast, molasses, wheat gluten, malt barley flour, soy oil, contains less than 2% ascorbic acid, enzyme, L. Cysteine (an amino acid). Processed in a facility which also processes tree nuts.).”

Einstein also using molasses.  Their flour is either bread or high gluten based upon the malt barley flour.  They add additional gluten and malt barley flour.  They use soy oil, as does MM.  They add corn syrup, which MM might also do based upon my own observations that MM was sweeter than MM#7 and earlier posts in this thread discuss the same issue, that it’s unlikely the sweetness in MM comes only from molasses. 

While I was out and about on Saturday, I picked up 25 pounds of All Trumps as I knew I would need to move to a high gluten flour to further my experimentation.  On Saturday evening, I made a batch of MM#7 using the All Trumps, and used it to cook a pizza on Monday.  I did not have a fresh MM pie to compare it to, but it tasted a lot closer to a real MM pie than the MM#7 with the Sam’s Club bread flour. 

I am going to use my All Trumps and work up a batch of MM#10.  But I am wondering, from your analysis, have you ruled out any additional sweeteners?  MM#9 has 10% more molasses compared to MM#7 – 39.99 vs. 36.19. Could it be that MM uses a little less molasses but also corn syrup for additional sweetness?  That would result in a slightly sweeter crust that was a little lighter in color.  But that would alter the carbohydrate sugars in the nutrition facts. Thanks for your thoughts.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1878 on: September 02, 2014, 05:36:27 PM »
Peter,I wanted to see just how close you were with MM#8 2.0 to the new MM#10.


Golden Granulated Evaporated Cane Juice Syrup/Golden Barrel Blackstrap Molasses MM Clone Dough Formulation (MM#8, 2.0).
KASL High-Gluten Flour (14.2%) (100%):
Spring Water (49.6%):
IDY (0.60%):
Salt (1.82%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.50%):
Sugar/Syrup* (9%):
Golden Barrel Blackstrap Molasses (3%):
Total (165.52%):
   312.93 g  |  11.04 oz | 0.69 lbs
155.21 g  |  5.47 oz | 0.34 lbs
1.88 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
5.7 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.02 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
4.69 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.03 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
28.16 g | 0.99 oz | 0.06 lbs
9.39 g | 0.33 oz | 0.02 lbs
517.95 g | 18.27 oz | 1.14 lbs | TF = 0.118684
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Online PrimeRib

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Re: Mellow Mushroom Pizza found in Atlanta and surroundin areas...Recipes?
« Reply #1879 on: September 02, 2014, 05:39:00 PM »
Well, I guess I am wrong on the pretzel dough being the same as the pizza dough, according to the Nutrition Facts calculator linked above, for equal calories of each, the fat, carbohydrate and protein profile is different.