Author Topic: Why add flour slowly?  (Read 2481 times)

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Offline enchant

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Why add flour slowly?
« on: October 18, 2006, 07:02:56 AM »
I see it advised everywhere, so don't doubt that it's necessary, but what is the purpose of adding flour to the water in the mixture slowly?  Why not just dump the whole thing in and start mixing? How is the final result different?
--pat--


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2006, 07:39:50 AM »
Pat,

With commercial mixers you can do it just as you said, but most home stand mixers, such as the typical KitchenAid mixer, can't intermix flour and water as effectively. Also, adding the flour gradually increases the hydration of the flour, which should make for a better dough. Of course, using an autolyse or similar rest period will further improve the hydration of the flour.

Peter

Offline pizzoid

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2006, 07:48:43 AM »
Along similar lines, I posted this over in the equipment area, maybe it belongs over here?

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3955.msg33017.html#msg33017

Offline enchant

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2006, 08:22:42 AM »
Also, adding the flour gradually increases the hydration of the flour, which should make for a better dough. Of course, using an autolyse or similar rest period will further improve the hydration of the flour.
What would be the difference in my finished baked crust?
--pat--

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2006, 10:10:58 AM »
Pat,

That's a very good question. However, it is difficult to answer in isolation because the final results will also depend on several other factors, including the dough formulation, dough production and management, and the particular baking conditions. Yet, if the flour is well hydrated, as occurs, for example, when an autolyse or similar rest period is used, the finished crust should have a higher volume with a lighter, more open crumb. If autolyse was used to get improved hydration, the crumb should also have a creamier color because of the reduced oxidation of the dough (carotenoids) due to the shorter overall knead time made possible by using the autolyse. A better hydrated dough will also handle better and be more extensible.

Peter

Offline enchant

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2006, 10:22:15 AM »
Yet, if the flour is well hydrated, as occurs, for example, when an autolyse or similar rest period is used, the finished crust should have a higher volume with a lighter, more open crumb.
Ahh...  I DO notice that my crusts have a denser-looking edge than many of the photos I see posted here.  Your crusts have lots of open pockets big enough to slip a marble into.  Mine don't have that.  I'm probably rushing the flour.

Quote
If autolyse was used to get improved hydration, the crumb should also have a creamier color because of the reduced oxidation of the dough (carotenoids) due to the shorter overall knead time made possible by using the autolyse. A better hydrated dough will also handle better and be more extensible.
I know that there is a lot of discussion about autolyse, so I'll do a little research before making tomorrow's dough.

Thanks!
--pat--

Offline scott r

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2006, 01:01:03 PM »
enchant, the denser looking crust could also be caused by more kneading, or more than likely a dryer dough formulation.

Offline enchant

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2006, 01:45:21 PM »
This is the problem with pizza.  Every problem has several possible solutions, but I only make one pizza a week.
  :-\
--pat--

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2006, 01:22:11 PM »
Autolyse and adding the flour slowly have two different impact on the dough.....

What happen to flour when is added slowly with a specific technique has in impact on the formation of the gluten

Ciao

Offline Jack

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Re: Why add flour slowly?
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2006, 08:37:15 PM »
but I only make one pizza a week.
  :-\

Yes, but this is easy to remedy.   ;)

Jack