Author Topic: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes  (Read 6369 times)

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Offline EdF

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Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« on: October 19, 2006, 02:41:17 PM »
Any comments?  We bought it and it looks great.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1118132718/?tag=pizzamaking-20


Offline Cohen

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2006, 10:50:11 PM »
It is one of favorate books and one that I got to most often for reference and recipes.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2010, 12:04:59 AM »
I bought this book with Mathew's advice (thanks Mathew!).  This is my first bread book.  I spent some time reading the reviews of most of the books available out there and this one consistently got high marks. 

I have been reading this trying to get a better understanding of dough to improve my pizza making and learn how to make bread, particularly french bread.  It is a fairly easy read and is somewhat technical in nature without being overwhelming or boring.  The first 1/4 of the book discusses different aspects of flour and dough, from grain to flour.  The rest of the book contains recipes for different types of breads.  Each recipe also comes with specific notes on fermentation times, cues on how the dough should look and feel, and unique hand techniques for that style of bread.

I have tried my hand at making french bread several times with mediocre results.  I have a bit better understanding of dough now mainly from making so many pizzas and having read the first part of this book.  For my first recipe, I choose a baguette recipe using poolish. 

I made the poolish this morning before work and it was ready to be incorporated into the final formula 10 hours later.  I made the dough, let it bench rest for 2 hours, preshaped & shaped, and let it proof another hour, then bake. 

I am so pleased that I made great french bread tonight.  The crust was nice and crusty with some chew to it.  The crumb was as soft and wonderful as could be.   I have always wondered if I could actually make a decent loaf at home using the home oven and hand kneading.  Now I know. 

Sam's club HG flour, IDY, salt, water, and Hamelman's book and techniques.  I did not have a french lame so I used a sharp chef's knife to score the bread.  I ended up making these more into loaves than baguette shapes but boy was the bread really good.  It just had a beautiful crumb structure. 

Chau
« Last Edit: September 03, 2010, 12:07:07 AM by Jackie Tran »

brayshaw

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2010, 04:58:42 AM »
Great effort there Chau :) they look very nice, what was the temp and bake time?
I think I could demolish one of those baguettes with a little bowl of EVOO to dip in!!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2010, 08:47:14 AM »
Thanks Paul, this was the first time that I've made bread and gotten that white bread texture to the crumb which I do like.   In the book, it says to bake at 460F for 24-26m for baguettes and 30 min for ovals or boules.  I ended up baking these at 450 for almost 30min. 

One tip that he gives for the home baker that I thought was really cool, is that after the bread has been steamed in the oven and starts to develop some browness to the skin, to use a spoon to vent the oven door for the remainder of the bake.  This allows the steam to escape and give the bread a bit crispier skin. 

Paul I understand you worked at a bakery for a bit.  I bet you can make really awesome bread.  Does my crumb look okay?  Is it suppose to have more big holes?   :P

Chau

brayshaw

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2010, 09:31:34 AM »
Thanks Paul, this was the first time that I've made bread and gotten that white bread texture to the crumb which I do like.   In the book, it says to bake at 460F for 24-26m for baguettes and 30 min for ovals or boules.  I ended up baking these at 450 for almost 30min. 

One tip that he gives for the home baker that I thought was really cool, is that after the bread has been steamed in the oven and starts to develop some browness to the skin, to use a spoon to vent the oven door for the remainder of the bake.  This allows the steam to escape and give the bread a bit crispier skin. 

Paul I understand you worked at a bakery for a bit.  I bet you can make really awesome bread.  Does my crumb look okay?  Is it suppose to have more big holes?   :P

Chau

Hey Chau,

PM sent.

Paul

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2010, 10:49:08 AM »
Chau those look great. I ordered this book a couple days ago, just waiting for it to arrive. I can't wait to make baguettes like those for roast beef.

Offline Matthew

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2010, 12:20:06 PM »
Chau,
Great job bro!  What steam method did you use? 

Matt

Offline EdF

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2010, 12:40:14 PM »
It was a long time ago that I asked about this book.  My wife was a pretty good baker when we got it, but this book took her to a new level (and me too).  I recommend it highly!

- Ed

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2010, 03:09:53 PM »
Ed, thanks for posting that the book help you and your wife a lot.   I was going to start a new thread but didn't want to clutter up the forum, so I posted here. 

David, you will enjoy the book.  It is great in it's simpliscity.

I just wanted to add that I'm no baker.   A struggling pizza maker at best with next to zero baking experience.  Wanted to let others know that this book is not just for professionals.  It is well written, concise, and simple enough for beginners.   I was able to employ skills I've learned from this forum and pizza making when using this book, such as dividing a recipe, calculating % of yeast, making adjustments to the yeast and hydration ratio, etc.  I would say pizza dough is generally handled the same way bread is so techniques can be used interchangeably.

Thx Matt.  TBH with you, I have been envious of the bread boule you posted recently for some time now.  I can see the crumb clear as day in my head.   :-D

Here's how I steamed my home oven.  There may be other techniques out there.   I preheat the oven for 40m-1hour with an empty pan at the bottom of the oven.  The pan can be directly under the stone or to the side.  To the side is better I think.  About 3m before I want to load the bread, I take about 2 (1/2 cups) of water and microwave them for about 2 mins so that they are hot.   You can boil water here if you want.   Right before loading the bread, I pour one of the cups into the hot pan and shut the door.  Let it steam for 20-30seconds or so.  Then open the door, load the bread and pour the 2nd 1/2 cup of water.  Shut the door and bake until there is some browness to the top of the loaves (7min?), then vent the door. 

I think next time, I will proof in a moist chamber or proof longer and then just add the steam righ after I load the bread.  So that's only 1 round of steam. 

Chau


Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2010, 03:24:26 PM »
How would I go about steaming in the WFO, with a spray bottle?

Offline EdF

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2010, 03:28:12 PM »
We generally do the same preheating, using a broiler pan beneath the stone, then put in the loaves, immediately add boiling water and close the oven.  Similar approach when cooking outdoors in the Big Green Egg.  I think there's a fair amount of flexibility as far as adding steam goes.

- Ed

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2010, 03:40:13 PM »
How would I go about steaming in the WFO, with a spray bottle?

David, from the few videos I've watched I believe you can mop the floor with a moist rag prior to loading the bread and close off the entrance to your WFO. 

Chau

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2010, 05:02:46 PM »
Nice looking loaves Tran Man. Now that you have the bread baking bug, you may also enjoy some of Peter Reinhart's books. The Bread Baker's Appretice is one I enjoyed and I regularly make his recipe for bagels....delicious!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2010, 05:20:15 PM »
Nice looking loaves Tran Man. Now that you have the bread baking bug, you may also enjoy some of Peter Reinhart's books. The Bread Baker's Appretice is one I enjoyed and I regularly make his recipe for bagels....delicious!

Thanks DMC.  ;D I'll check that out as well down the road sometime. 

Offline Matthew

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2010, 05:53:12 PM »
Ed, thanks for posting that the book help you and your wife a lot.   I was going to start a new thread but didn't want to clutter up the forum, so I posted here. 

Thx Matt.  TBH with you, I have been envious of the bread boule you posted recently for some time now.  I can see the crumb clear as day in my head.   :-D

Here's how I steamed my home oven.  There may be other techniques out there.   I preheat the oven for 40m-1hour with an empty pan at the bottom of the oven.  The pan can be directly under the stone or to the side.  To the side is better I think.  About 3m before I want to load the bread, I take about 2 (1/2 cups) of water and microwave them for about 2 mins so that they are hot.   You can boil water here if you want.   Right before loading the bread, I pour one of the cups into the hot pan and shut the door.  Let it steam for 20-30seconds or so.  Then open the door, load the bread and pour the 2nd 1/2 cup of water.  Shut the door and bake until there is some browness to the top of the loaves (7min?), then vent the door. 

I think next time, I will proof in a moist chamber or proof longer and then just add the steam righ after I load the bread.  So that's only 1 round of steam. 

Chau


I use a Romertopf clay baker.  Your method is very good but can be dangerous.  This method works really well to & alot less risky.
http://www.northwestsourdough.com/newsite/videos.html
I'm in the process of activating some San Francisco sourdough starter, can't wait till it's done.
By the way, what's THB?

Matt

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2010, 06:15:05 PM »
 :-D  Not very many things I do is the safest method but I don't always have the time and luxury of doing things the right way.  I like to find 'workarounds' to keep my mind sharp.  I will take small calculated risks but I'm by no means into living dangerously either.

When steaming with the method I posted.  I pour hot water into the pan and not boiling water.  Boiling water is much more dangerous to handle.  I also pour it quickly and shut the door quickly to avoid getting burned.  The risk of burn here is quite a bit lower than when I use the broiler method for making NP style pizza.   Also if anyone is interested in using this method, I would recommend pouring the hot water with maybe a small kettle with a spout.  That would be safer.   

TBH means "to be honest".  You make great looking (and I'm sure great tasting) stuff.  I'd love to be able to replicate some of what you've done Matt. 

I'll check out the romertopf clay.  Thanks for posting that. 

Chau

Offline Matthew

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Re: Jeff Hamelman: Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2010, 07:11:50 PM »


TBH means "to be honest".  You make great looking (and I'm sure great tasting) stuff.  I'd love to be able to replicate some of what you've done Matt. 



Chau

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