Author Topic: Can anyone convert this?  (Read 1932 times)

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Offline husker3in4

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Can anyone convert this?
« on: October 18, 2006, 11:20:20 AM »
I don't do well with percentages...

Flour(a strong bread type flour with 12 to 13% protein) 100.00%
Salt:1.75%
Sugar:(optional) 2.00%
   
Compressed Yeast: 1.50%
Olive Oil/Vegetable Oil: 3.00%
Water (70 to 75F) 55 to 58.00%


Thanks!


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2006, 12:30:03 PM »
husker3in4,

I recognized your dough formulation. It is Tom Lehmann's "traditional, American style, thin crust" dough formulation as posted at the Recipe Bank at PMQ.com. Unfortunately, Tom does not tell us how much dough the formulation makes, or an individual dough ball weight, or corresponding pizza size. Consequently, to use the dough formulation, it will be necessary to either specify the total amount of dough (by weight) you want to make or the amount of flour (by weight) you would like to use. Typically, an American style pizza is a medium-crust pizza with a thickness factor of around 0.11. This is not a fixed number. You can go to 0.12-0.13 if you'd like for a thicker crust. As a frame of reference, a thickness factor of 0.10 is considered thin, such as a NY style.

If you give me a thickness factor you'd like to try, as well as the number and sizes of pizzas you would like to try, I should be able to give you the amounts of ingredients to use. Please also indicate what kind of yeast you would like to use. Tom's dough formulation specifies compressed yeast (fresh yeast), which I assume you may not have in mind to use.

Peter

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2006, 09:41:10 PM »
Hi pete, dont you ever get tired of answering this noobs questions? :)

I want to make two 12" pizzas. I am still confused as to what thickness factor is all about, or how to measure it. I also have no clue what compressed yeast is. Mostly what I find in the local stores is active dry yeast. Am I at least correct in assuming "rapid rise active yeast" is instant yeast?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2006, 10:01:44 PM »
Hi pete, dont you ever get tired of answering this noobs questions? :)


husker3in4,

Not at all. I want your kids to have good pizza and to save you a few bucks.

I assumed a thickness factor of 0.11 and plugged all of the baker’s percents numbers from the dough formulation you posted into the dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html. Assuming that you use active dry yeast (ADY) and 58% hydration, the numbers for two 12” pizzas are as follows:

Flour (100%):         426.22 g  |  15.03 oz | 0.94 lbs
Water (58%):          247.21 g  |  8.72 oz | 0.54 lbs
Oil (3%):                 12.79 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.74 tsp | 0.91 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):          7.46 g | 0.26 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.34 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
ADY (0.75%):          3.2 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.85 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
Sugar (2%):            8.52 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.14 tsp | 0.71 tbsp
Total (165.5%):      705.39 g | 24.88 oz | 1.56 lbs | TF = 0.11
Single Ball:             352.69 g | 12.44 oz | 0.78 lbs

If you use the Rapid-Rise yeast, which is similar to instant dry yeast (IDY), the numbers are as follows:

Flour (100%):          426.86 g  |  15.06 oz | 0.94 lbs
Water (58%):           247.58 g  |  8.73 oz | 0.55 lbs
Oil (3%):                  12.81 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.74 tsp | 0.91 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):           7.47 g | 0.26 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.34 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
IDY (0.5%):              2.13 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.71 tsp | 0.24 tbsp
Sugar (2%):             8.54 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.14 tsp | 0.71 tbsp
Total (165.25%):     705.39 g | 24.88 oz | 1.56 lbs | TF = 0.11
Single Ball:               352.69 g | 12.44 oz | 0.78 lbs

As you can see, there is not much difference between using the ADY or the Rapid-Rise yeast. However, if you use the ADY you will have to hydrate it in a bit of warm water. The Rapid-Rise yeast can be added directly to the flour.

Let me know if you need any further help.

Peter

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2006, 10:10:35 PM »
Thanks pete, can you tell me how much .94lbs of flour is in cups? same with the water? I dont have a scale, while I may get one in the future, Im not that far yet. I did buy a peel and a bigger cooking stone, as well as some serving pans, but no scale yet.

Also, how long would I let this dough sit in the refrigerator?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2006, 10:38:31 PM »
husker3in4,

Assuming you are using the King Arthur bread flour, it comes to about 3 1/2 cups plus 2 T. plus 1 t. To measure out the flour, you should fluff up the flour in the bag, lift the flour from the bag with a scoop or tablespoon into your measuring cups/spoons to the point of overflowing, and then level off the top with the flat back edge of a knife. You shouldn't shake the measuring cups/spoons or bang the measuring cups against a hard surface. If you are using a brand of bread flour other than the King Arthur brand, I would stick with the above numbers.

The water comes to about 1 1/8 c. when viewed with the measuring cup on a flat surface and the markings viewed at eye level.

The dough can be used within 12-72 hours after being refrigerated, as noted in the instructions here: http://www.pmq.com/recipe/view_recipe.php?id=50.

Peter

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2006, 12:01:08 AM »
Thanks pete, thats what I needed to know!

I am still in search of a good pizza sauce. I cant get the 6 in1 tomatoes everyone talks about here. I just need a simple sauce, sweet yet flavorful but not overpowering. Any suggestions?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2006, 12:38:44 AM »
husker3in4,

I tend to keep my sauces simple. In case you do not know this, the 6-in1s can be purchased online from Escalon, at http://www.escalon.net. That is where I get my 6-in1s because there is no place near me that sells them.

I use the 6-in-1s directly out of the can, uncooked, with a bit of dried oregano (imported Sicilian), dried basil, maybe some garlic granules (or fresh minced garlic), and maybe some crushed red pepper flakes. The 6-in-1s are naturally sweet, so I have found no need to add any sugar to them. Sometimes I add freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Romano cheese, or a combination, along with a splash of nice olive oil. On occasion, as a change of pace, I will use the Penzeys pizza seasoning, which can be purchased online at http://www.penzeys.com/. Penzeys also has retail stores from which you should be able to purchase the pizza seasoning if you live near one of their stores. The Penzeys pizza seasoning is fairly strong in fennel so if fennel is too much for you, you might want to pass on it or use only a little of the seasoning.

During the spring and summer months, I grow Italian oregano and the Neapolitan basil, which I also use on my pizzas until the cold weather shuts them down (although the oregano sometimes makes it through the Texas winter). The fresh herbs are a very nice touch, because of their intense and distinctive flavors and freshness, but if you don’t have access to them, you can use the dried versions. I would especially look for the imported wild oregano. It is a big improvement over the other varieties in my opinion. You might start with small amounts until you find the right amount to use without overpowering the sauce.

Peter

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2006, 07:14:54 PM »
Thanks pete, I might have to look into ordering those tomatoes online. I just hate waiting for things to come in the mail, it was bad enough waiting for my new pizza stone to come in the mail. It fits perfectly in my small oven, taking just about all the space up. That way it will be harder to make a mess when sliding the pizza off the peel.

BTW, you never mentioned exactly what thickness factor is, and how to measure it?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can anyone convert this?
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2006, 07:38:50 PM »
husker3in4,

I didn't want to confuse you on the thickness factor so early in the game. But since you asked, you can take a look at this post, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,524.msg18835.html#msg18835 (Reply 137), along with the articles for which links are provided in that post.

Peter