Author Topic: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method  (Read 90749 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #140 on: April 23, 2009, 07:14:58 PM »
tsmys,

Can you tell me what dough formulation you used?

Also, did I understand your post correctly in that you added all of the flour/IDY to the mixer bowl before you switched to the flat beater attachment, that is, while the whisk attachment was still secured? Adding the flour/IDY a tablespoon at a time without waiting for it to be fully incorporated is fine.

When I measure out the yeast, I use the volume measurement, which I have found to be close enough to the weight measured out on a scale. I do likewise with the salt and oil. I weigh only the flour and water.

For the amount of yeast and fermentation time you are using, I don't think you need to make any slits in the lid. The dough isn't going to produce enough gases of fermentation to blow the lid off.

Don't worry about asking questions.

Peter


Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #141 on: April 23, 2009, 08:20:36 PM »
Here is the info about today's dough;



KASL          100%     274.18g
Water          60        164.51
IDY               .40         1.1  (could actually be anywhere from 1.1-1.9)
Salt             1.75         4.8  (rounded to 5)
Oil               1             2.74 (rounded to 3)
Sugar           0             0

TF                .1065
BR                2.5
Total Weight:  447.32  (actual finished dough weight was 457g)

Temp of finished dough ball was 73f

Dough has been refrigerated for approx. 3 hours and looks to have roughly doubled in size. 

Edges of dough have, for lack of a better term, small craters visible through the container.  Is this normal?

I have a thermometer in the fridge but it hasn't been in place long enough to give an accurate reading.

Yes, you understood the flour/IDY addition correctly.

Should the container lids be ventilated for a longer proof?  These containers were purchased specifically for dough balls so I have no problem slitting the lids.

By the way, I really appreciate the spell checker.  I may not be the world's worst speller, but I've got to be in the bottom five!


Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #142 on: April 23, 2009, 08:54:26 PM »
tsmys,

Based on your observation that the dough had a finished dough temperature of 73 degrees F and it doubled within about three hours, I believe you may have used too much yeast. The 0.40% IDY translates into about 1.1 grams. That is equivalent to a bit over 1/3 teaspoon of IDY (0.36 t.). With that amount of yeast, and with the finished dough temperature you achieved, it would take something like 1 to 2 days (and perhaps closer to two days than one day) for the dough to double while in the refrigerator. It would not be normal for "crevices" to form in the dough. Maybe you can revisit what you did and let me know if you did, indeed, use too much yeast. The dough in such a case would still be usable but sooner than originally intended. With your dough behaving as you mentioned, you might want to poke a hole in the lid.

With my basic KitchenAid stand mixer, I would not be able to add all of the flour/IDY with the whisk attachment secured. My machine would start to groan and a good part of the dough would end up inside of the whisk attachment and would not be subjected to much mixing. Once I see that the dough can't be fully incorporated by the whisk, I switch to the flat beater attachment and add as much as the flat beater attachment can handle.

Peter

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #143 on: April 24, 2009, 10:01:03 AM »
Pete, it's quite possible that I used too much IDY.  I added a pinch at a time to the scale until 1 gram showed on the readout and ten a few extra pinches.  Next time I'll count the pinches it takes to get to 1 gram so I'll be able to calculate about how many pinches I need to get a weight that's very close to what's called for.  I suppose there is also the possibility that adding the IDY to the scale in such small quantities, (one pinch at a time), that the scale didn't register the correct one gram weight until well after one gram was actually on the scale.  BTW I use a OXO Good Grips food scale w/ an 11# capacity that weighs a nickle at 5 grams.

My mixer is a KA Pro 5 Plus.  I Didn't notice any straining when the Whisk was attached and all the flour was added.  Roughly half the flour/water mixture was trapped in the whisk and it was obvious little mixing was going on when I changed to the flat beater.  Also I have some pics to share but have been having trouble downloading them.  I'll try again in the next post but I'm growing weary of retyping this text. :D

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #144 on: April 24, 2009, 11:06:50 AM »
Dough ball before refrigeration.

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #145 on: April 24, 2009, 11:11:04 AM »
Dough ball after 3-4 hours of refridgeration at 38 degrees f.

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #146 on: April 24, 2009, 11:13:16 AM »
BTW;  the container in the above pictures has a 2qt capacity and measures 7" across.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #147 on: April 24, 2009, 11:25:07 AM »
tsmys,

From the most recent photos, I am pretty certain that you used too much yeast. I have a special scale that can weigh small amounts of lightweight ingredients, like yeast, but I have found that the volume measurements specified by the dough calculating tools are quite reliable. Hence, I use those measurements for things like yeast, salt, sugar and oil. I only weigh the flour and water.

Peter

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #148 on: April 24, 2009, 10:15:34 PM »
Peter, you're the man!  My latest dough turned out great :D  This was hands down the easiest working dough I have made to date.  None of the frustration of stretching it out and watching it shrink back or even worse, tear.  After the dough warmed up to room temp it looked kind of spongy so I re-balled it and pressed into a disk on the counter and let it rest for about an hour covered by a wet towell.  When it was time to make the pizza it was almost as it the dough wanted to be stretched out!  Admittedly I have some work to do to perfect my stretching technique.  The dough was probably thinner in the middle than it should have been, but it never ripped.  Although not perfectly round it was far from being the oblong shape I usually end up with.  But after the embarrassment of my last effort...  Maybe nobody being around to see this one had something to do with it turning out so well! :-D  Here are pics after the pie is dressed and after it came out of the oven.

Offline tsmys

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #149 on: April 24, 2009, 10:17:31 PM »
Side and bottom views of tonights pie.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #150 on: April 24, 2009, 10:35:14 PM »
tsmys,

I'm glad to hear that things worked out better for you this time. Since your use of more yeast might have altered things, you might want to repeat the exercise to satisfy yourself that it wasn't a fluke. I think you will also find that a longer fermentation time (e.g., two or more days) will affect the extensibility of the dough, although using a hydration of 60% will mitigate some of that effect. On the plus side, the longer fermentation should produce a better crust with more flavor and a better texture.

Peter

Offline BillE

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #151 on: April 30, 2009, 05:51:36 PM »
Pete-zza,

I tried out the formula that you provided for me in post #131 of this thread for 2 14" pizza's. I let one dough ball ferment in the fridge for 2 days and the other ball for 4 days. Unfortunately, I found the resulting crusts of both pizzas to be rather bland in flavor. When I removed the 4 day old dough from the fridge, the top of it had tiny, tiny, bubbles on top of it and a series of 1/4" and 1/2" bubbles at the bottom which I viewed from the glass bowl it was fermenting in. It had a nice sweet, yeasty aroma to it, yet baked into a bland-tasting crust even though the color of it was a light gold with a few brown spots. The 2 day old dough also had a nice aroma to it, yet yielded the same blandness. Also, in both, I thought the crusts were a bit too chewy for my taste, so I made one 14" dough recipe in which I tripled the amount of oil from 1/2 tsp. to 1 1/2 tsp. Was better, but still a bit too chewy for me.
I figured, at this point, that I would play around with the recipe by adjusting water temperature and then yeast quantity, if need be.

Before doing this, however, I happened to be in the bookstore and came across a book about no-knead bread-baking titled "Kneadlessly Simple" by Nancy Baggett. I've heard about this revolutionary way of preparing bread dough, and after thumbing through it's pages and seeing that it also contained a no-knead pizza dough recipe, I decided to purchase it.
Well let me tell you, using the book's recipe, I ended up with the best-tasting pizza crust I ever made in my 6 years of making pizza's! Definitely better than my previous favorite recipe, Peter Reinhart's N.Y. Style pizza dough from "American Pie".

Baggett cites her inspiration for the use of ice-water in the dough recipe from Philippe Gosselin's Pain a`l' Ancienne method which she read about in Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice". Also, the  mixed final dough, before fermentation, resembles Reinhart's 'Pizza Dough 1' recipe from his book "Crust & Crumb", in that the dough's hydration is so high (15 oz AP flour to 12 oz water) that it must be spread out on oiled parchment with oiled fingertips into a pizza shape. (I like this because no need of messing up the counter top with extra flour).
Also, there's no sugar in the recipe, yet because of the long, cool fermentation at around 68 degrees, the flour's natural sugars are drawn out resulting in great crust-color and subtle sweet flavor. Another reason for the great crust-color is the wetness of the dough which allows for additional baking in the oven without drying out the inside of the crust.
The recipe called for a 25-45 min. rest of the stretched out pie before baking. I had let mine rest for 25 min. which resulted in a medium-thin crust similar to what tsmys displayed in post #149 on this thread. Being a native New Yorker, next time I'm going to try a 5 min. rest before baking in order to get a thinner crust.
Baggett recommended a 500 degree oven that's been preheated for only 20 min before baking, however, my instincts told me to preheat for the usual 1 hour instead, with a pizza stone of the bottom rack. Also, my oven goes up to 525 degrees, so that's what I had set it to and I enjoyed great results.
My wife, who routinely discards her pizza crusts, ate every bit of it with this recipe as the inside was like Italian bread and the outside had a slight crunch to it along with it's great flavor.
At this point, I have no need to experiment with other pizza dough recipes, rather, I'll be trying out the muffin, dinner rolls, and bread recipes from this fabulous book.

Here's the no-knead pizza dough recipe:

Ingredients - 15 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour (plus more if needed) (I used KA All Purpose Flour)
                   generous 1 1/4 tsp table salt
                   1/2 tsp instant, fast-rising, or bread machine yeast
                   scant 1 1/2 cups ice-water (about 50 degrees according to book) plus more if needed.
                   1 TBLS olive oil


In a large bowl, thoroughly stir together the flour, salt, and yeast with a wooden spoon. (Can also use a mixer with paddle attachment, which I did). Vigorously stir in the water, scraping down the sides, just until thoroughly blended. Stir in the olive oil until evenly incorporated. After a minute or two of stirring, should end up with a single, sticky, yet firm mass, (just past the point of being a thick batter). There should be no clumps of wet dough on the sides of the bowl; add a little more flour if there is. If the mass of sticky dough is too difficult to stir, add a little more ice-water to facilitate mixing.
At this point, the book says to brush the mass of dough with olive oil and divide in half after the first rise, since this recipe makes two pizzas. (However, I though it best to divide in half right away and then let it rise so that the stretching out later would be easier, the same as you always recommend Pete-zza.)
Brush top of dough (or doughs) with olive oil and cover bowl with oiled plastic wrap.
Let the first rising take place at cool room temperature, (68-70 degrees) No Higher. for 4-12 hours. (For best flavor and/or convenience, the dough can be refrigerated for 3-10 hours BEFORE the 4-12 hours cool room temperature rising. I refrigerated mine for 8 hours before the cool room temp rise.
After the first rising at cool room temp, stir the dough ball in their bowls to deflate them, then transfer each to a piece of 14" oiled parchment paper. Drizzle the top each dough with a little olive oil, oil your fingertips, then gently stretch out dough to desired pie thickness. I pretty much stretched it out as far as I could with out tearing the dough and leaving the edges slightly thicker. Your instincts will likely guide you with this process.
Tent each formed pie with non-stick spray-coated foil or oiled plastic wrap and let rise for 25-45 min. depending how thick you want your finished crust. I found that a 25 min. rise yields a med-thin crust and like I said above, I'll be trying out a 5 min. rise to get it a little thinner.
For baking, the book says to preheat oven for 20 min at 500 degrees with a rimless baking sheet, or an upside-down rimmed sheet on the lowest rack, and transferring the pizza (with no toppings) and parchment (or the pizza on a lightly-oiled pizza pan) onto the baking sheet to cook for 7-10 min until firm and puffed up. Then to take it out of the oven to spread on your sauce, add cheese and/or other toppings then returning to oven for additional 10 min or until nicely browned.
What I did instead, was to preheat my 14 by 16 inch pizza stone on the bottom rack at 525 degrees for one hour, place all my toppings on the pizza, and baked it on the stone. It took about 10 min, instead of the usual 6-7 min to cook it to the proper crust color. The parchment turned a light brown during baking, without burning. What I neglected to do was to place the finished pie on a cooling rack after removing from oven to retain crispness. I'll definitely try that the next time.
 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #152 on: April 30, 2009, 08:48:58 PM »
BillE,

Thank you very much for reporting back on your results using the Lehmann dough formulation I gave you. It is always helpful to determine what you like so that you don't spend too much time going down a nonproductive path.

There are limitations to what the Lehmann dough can deliver in the way of taste in the finished crust. The Lehmann NY style dough formulation is a commercial formulation intended to make dough for professional pizza operators that is cold fermented for up to 2-3 days before using. It is not intended to make an artisan pizza with a crust bursting with flavor. In order to coax more flavor out of a Lehmann dough, you have to do certain things. These include 1) using the methods described in this thread to make a dough that can endure up to 23 days of cold fermentation, 2) converting the Lehmann dough formulation to a preferment format, such as a poolish/sponge/biga/old dough preferment format, 3) using a natural starter or preferment in lieu of the commercial yeast normally used for the Lehmann dough formulation, or 4) modify the Lehmann dough formulation to produce a dough that ferments strictly at room temperature for several hours up to almost a day. I have done just about all of these things at one time or another. I do it because I enjoy the learning process but most people are unwilling or unprepared to use most of these alternatives because they are not easy to do and they take time. Most people would like to have their pizzas while they are still young.

The use of a no-knead dough to make pizzas has been covered on this forum on different occasions, including most recently at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7745.0.html. The Reinhart Baker's Apprentice pizza dough formulation has been discussed at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,203.msg1397.html#msg1397. I showed how to make a 20-24 hour room temperature fermented  dough at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7225.msg62332.html#msg62332. For a very high hydration rustic dough formulation, see http://hollosyt.googlepages.com/quickrusticciabattapizza. Most of the results using these formulations will yield crust flavors that exceed what you will get from a normal cold fermented dough, including the Lehmann dough.

In light of your success with the Baggett dough, you might want to start a new thread to bring the Baggett formulation and methods to the attention of the members. We have quite a few members who have interest in no-knead doughs.

Peter


Offline BurntEdges

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #153 on: May 01, 2009, 11:17:30 AM »
For a very high hydration rustic dough formulation, see http://hollosyt.googlepages.com/quickrusticciabattapizza.

Pete-zza,

I'm an avid follower of your Kitchenaid method and use it for just about every dough formula with great success.  Thank you.

The above link you provided looks like a great pizza for a home oven using a Kitchenaid.  Have you tried it?

Although a photograph caption indicated that it was a 100% hydration recipe, I used the mass - volume food calculator which reflected one cup of water being about 237 grams; - then went to the dough calculator to convert the recipe into weights:

Flour (100%):
Water (94.8%):
IDY (1.2%):
Salt (2.8%):
Total (198.8%):
250 g  |  8.82 oz | 0.55 lbs
237 g  |  8.36 oz | 0.52 lbs
3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
7 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.46 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
497 g | 17.53 oz | 1.1 lbs | TF = N/A

Since the yeast is not being activated in this recipe, I'm assuming it's IDY?  I'm used to using 1/4 of a teaspoon for such a quantity of dough so 1 teaspoon seems excessive, but it is a 2 hour dough.
Please let me know if this conversion seems correct and my guess on the IDY .  Thanks.

If anyone else has any experience with this recipe, please chime in on your results.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 01:51:00 PM by BurntEdges »

Offline BillE

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #154 on: May 01, 2009, 01:37:23 PM »
Pete-zza,

Thanks so much for the links!

I have to say, the thought of a Lehmann dough rising in the fridge for a few weeks is a wild concept. I can only imagine the flavor of the final crust.
You have me curious about your 20-24 hour room-temp fermented dough; will certainly give that a try, and will get back to you with my results.

Have a great weekend.

Bill

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #155 on: May 01, 2009, 02:26:25 PM »
The above link you provided looks like a great pizza for a home oven using a Kitchenaid.  Have you tried it?

Although a photograph caption indicated that it was a 100% hydration recipe, I used the mass - volume food calculator which reflected one cup of water being about 237 grams; - then went to the dough calculator to convert the recipe into weights:

Flour (100%):
Water (94.8%):
IDY (1.2%):
Salt (2.8%):
Total (198.8%):
250 g  |  8.82 oz | 0.55 lbs
237 g  |  8.36 oz | 0.52 lbs
3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
7 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.46 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
497 g | 17.53 oz | 1.1 lbs | TF = N/A

Since the yeast is not being activated in this recipe, I'm assuming it's IDY?  I'm used to using 1/4 of a teaspoon for such a quantity of dough so 1 teaspoon seems excessive, but it is a 2 hour dough.
Please let me know if this conversion seems correct and my guess on the IDY .  Thanks.


BurntEdges,

No, I have not tried the rustic dough recipe. However, it is on my "to do" list.

You are correct that the recipe does not use a hydration of 100%. Not long ago, a member sent me a PM on the recipe and I converted it to baker's percent format and saw that the hydration was not 100%. I also got the same set of baker's percents that you recited, although I was using table salt for conversion purposes whereas you appear to be using Morton's Kosher salt. I imagine that is is possible to use the whisk/flat paddle combination with the recipe although I usually stick with the instructions given for a recipe that I am trying for the first time. However, I think that you could really rev up the whisk attachment for a fair amount of the dough, at least until it bogs down.

Recently, one of our members, djones148, provided a link to thefreshloaf.com website, at http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5285/sullivan-street-potato-pizza, in which a poster described making a dough with a hydration of over 100%. That would also be an interesting dough to try. I did a Google search and found what appears to be the Glezer dough recipe at http://notitievanlien.blogspot.com/2008/04/sullivan-street-potato-pizza-english.html.

I believe you are correct that the yeast in the dough formulation you posted is IDY. If the water was really warm (120-130 degrees F), it would be possible to add ADY directly to the flour, but the recipe is silent as to water temperature. So, I would guess that the yeast is IDY. For a dough to be made and used in a short period of time, the amount of yeast would have to be high.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 02:37:42 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline BurntEdges

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #156 on: May 01, 2009, 03:05:00 PM »
Pete-zza,

I usually use cold filtered water around 40'F for your Kitchenaid method.  With all the beaters to run through on your method, I strive to keep the finished dough temperature as low as possible for a 5 to 7 day nap in the frig.  With the rustic dough recipe, you are correct in that the water temperature is unspecified.  Knowing the approach of that recipe and its intended use 2 hours later, what water temperature would you suggest I try?

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #157 on: May 01, 2009, 03:15:31 PM »
With the rustic dough recipe, you are correct in that the water temperature is unspecified.  Knowing the approach of that recipe and its intended use 2 hours later, what water temperature would you suggest I try?

BurntEdges,

With all the yeast (1.2%), I don't think that it will really matter what the water temperature is (within reason). I think I would just go with room temperature water. If you try the recipe, it would be interesting to know what the finished dough temperature is.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #158 on: November 19, 2009, 09:25:43 AM »
Peter,
The experiments you did here were amazing.  All of your pizzas looked tasty.  Your many day fermentation have me thinking how would I apply this to my recipe.  ::)  Since I read you did add oil and didn't add oil to different experiments, I still want to add oil.  In some of your experiments you used really cold water for the longer fermentation. 
I am still going to do some experimenting on the recipe I now am using and see if I can push it to 8 days like the dough I left in the deli case. Do you have any ideas of what I can do to the recipe I am using?  I am going to try the 3 little dough balls this coming week to see if they will give me the same results as this week.  I do have some frozen dough balls left out from this week and I will be going over to market tomorrow to do some cleaning.  Do you suggest I get a few dough balls out of the freezer and see what happens with them?
This is the recipe I now am using.  Almost the same recipe you help me with.

15 lbs.

Flour (100%):    4222.04 g  |  148.93 oz | 9.31 lbs
Water (59%):    2491 g  |  87.87 oz | 5.49 lbs
IDY (0.26%):    10.98 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 3.64 tsp | 1.21 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):    73.89 g | 2.61 oz | 0.16 lbs | 5.13 tbsp | 0.32 cups
Olive Oil (1%):    42.22 g | 1.49 oz | 0.09 lbs | 9.38 tsp | 3.13 tbsp
Total (162.01%):   6840.13 g | 241.27 oz | 15.08 lbs | TF = 0.1
Single Ball:   570.01 g | 20.11 oz | 1.26 lb

I really don't want to make too  many major changes to the recipe I am using, because it is working out well for me.  I really like the KASL flour.
In some of your experimenting here you are using higher levels of hydration.  How will that affect my recipe?   Will this longer fermentation work for me at the level of hydration I am now using? Also, I am having good success with using plastic bags to store my dough, so I don't want to change that either.
I am intrigued by the gray spots you report about.  I have never experienced them.
I don't know if any of these methods will be able to be used by me to get a consistent result from week to week, but do want to raise the level of my pizzas the best I can.
Thanks,
Norma



















Always working and looking for new information!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New KitchenAid Dough Making Method
« Reply #159 on: November 19, 2009, 03:28:31 PM »
Norma,

As you gathered, this thread evolved over time and took a life of its own, with each experiment suggesting another, and then another, and so on.

In the very beginning, all I was trying to do was to get greater efficiency out of my basic KitchenAid mixer with a C-hook. Using the whisk attachment and the flat beater attachment along with the C-hook gave me that greater efficiency. This was followed by the desire to get a longer dough life than what I had achieved up to that time. I decided to use the Lehmann NY style dough formulation as a vehicle for that experiment. I was able to use the higher hydration (65%) because the new KitchenAid method, along with sifting the flour, allowed me to do this. I also liked the idea of a higher hydration because I felt that I would get better oven spring. However, I did later use a lower hydration. I think it was around 62%. But even with the higher hydration doughs, the doughs were not wet because of the improved hydration of the flour.

Most of the experiments I conducted in this thread used oil, mainly because I was using the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation that calls for oil. One of the experiments I conducted demonstrated that it was not necessary to incorporate the oil into the dough later in the dough making process, which is the method that Tom Lehmann advocates. Tom's method may work better for a commercial mixer but in my mixer I find it difficult to use Tom's method of later oil addition if the amount of oil gets above a few percent.

A key revelation, which was one that I believe contributed to longer useful dough life, was the idea of incorporating the IDY into the dough making process later in the dough making process rather than at the beginning. I believe that ThunderStik came to the same conclusion. Using cold water and trying to keep the dough as cold as possible for as long as possible were also important factors. I know that you are not using ADY, but I discovered that it was also possible to use ADY dry in a Lehmann style dough. I also used that method to make one of my Papa John's clone doughs.

With the above as background for your questions, I think in your case I would stay with your current dough formulation for now but make a few changes but not the actual baker's percents you are now using. First, I would use cold water. I used water out of the refrigerator. You may be able to use even colder water with your mixer but when I have tried using ice cold water in my home mixer, it is difficult to get good and efficient hydration of the flour. Second, I would add the IDY later in the dough making process rather than adding it to the flour up front. In your case, if you are adding the oil as Tom Lehmann recommends, the addition of the IDY can take place before or after adding the oil. Ideally, at the end of the process, you want to get a finished dough temperature under 70 degrees F and, if possible, even lower. I don't know if that is possible with your mixer.

I think you should be OK using the food grade storage bags that you have been using. I conducted many experiments using lidded metal containers to cool off the dough balls quicker, but I think the storage bags you are using should do a comparable job because they are of low mass and will be immediately exposed to the cooling action of your cooler. I have used this method in my experiments making frozen dough balls. Ideally, you want to get the dough balls into your cooler as soon as possible. Your cooler should operate at a lower temperature than my home refrigerator compartment but that advantage will disappear somewhat because of the much larger number of dough balls that you make compared with what I do at home.

If you decide to go forward with the above suggestions, it will be very interesting to see if you are able to extend the usual dough life of dough balls made in a commercial environment to the eight days that you have set as your goal. As with any experiment, the results you achieve, or fail to achieve, are still useful since they may suggest other experiments that might lead to the desired results. You will note that I have not suggested using less yeast at this stage. I would like to see how your current dough formulation works with the recommended changes before looking more carefully at the yeast quantity.

With respect to the frozen dough balls that you mentioned, I don't see any harm in defrosting and using them. Tom Lehmann usually advocates that frozen dough balls stored in a static freezer (such as a standalone home freezer or the freezer compartment of a home refrigerator) be used within 10 days, and maybe a few days longer.

Peter