Author Topic: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown  (Read 932 times)

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Offline WarEagle09

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Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« on: July 02, 2014, 08:44:16 PM »
There is a Marco's pizza opening where I live. After doing a little bit of research, it looks to be a slight improvement on Papa John's. I do not know very much about Marco's. I am not looking to start a reverse engineering effort, but, rather, to generate discussion about what set's Marco's pies apart from Papa John's. Internet research appears to indicate that Marco's is a fast-growing chain, so I thought it would be worthwhile to dedicate a thread on this forum to Marco's.

The first thing that pops out to me from perusing their website is the fact that they do not use the commissary model: they make their dough on site, which is very unusual for a large chain. Obviously this would make it easier for large number of current or former employees to provide detailed information about dough formulation. They also provide detailed nutrition, ingredient, and allergen information on their website. There are more noteworthy items there than I am willing to dedicate to this post.

Unrelated to their pizza, I also found it interesting that their sub sandwiches with either ham or Italian meat or meatballs contain trans fat. While I'm not one that avoids processed foods or meats altogether, I do prefer to eat real meat and real fat, regardless of whether or not it underwent processing.

I do not know what type of ovens they use. I assume, like any large chain, they source their cheese from Leprino and their sauce from either Stanislaus or Escalon.

I really wanted to see if anyone here has eaten a Marco's pizza, and what their experience was, and how it compares to a Papa John's pizza (since that one underwent a significant reverse engineering effort). If anyone has any other comments, please feel free to contribute!


Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2014, 11:41:38 AM »
There is a Marco's pizza opening where I live. After doing a little bit of research, it looks to be a slight improvement on Papa John's. I do not know very much about Marco's. I am not looking to start a reverse engineering effort, but, rather, to generate discussion about what set's Marco's pies apart from Papa John's. Internet research appears to indicate that Marco's is a fast-growing chain, so I thought it would be worthwhile to dedicate a thread on this forum to Marco's.

Marco's came to our neighborhood just a couple years ago, right after Sarpino's http://www.sarpinos.com/

I think you hit the nail on the head when you compared them to Papa John's.   ^^^   
For both of these chains, I have found them to be very reminiscent of a traditional Papa John's pizza.  I have only had Marco's twice, and I was not impressed.  Not bad, but nothing to write about.  I would be just as happy with a Papa John's, although in general I am not a big fan of chain pizzas.  However, of the big 4 in my neck of the woods (Pizza Hut, Dominos, Little Caesars, and Papa Johns), the Papa is probably the only one I will willingly pay for, if I have to and if I have a coupon.  I have not tried Marco's other food offerings, so I really cannot comment on them.  If you like that style of pizza (very sweet crust and sauce) you might give them a try and report back in the Pizza Restaurant forum to let us know what you think.

-ME  8)
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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2014, 09:10:14 PM »
From Sarpinos website............We hand-knead our dough and allow it to proof three times to fully develop its flavor and texture


What does it mean to proof dough 3 times?

CB
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Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2014, 12:20:42 AM »
From Sarpinos website............We hand-knead our dough and allow it to proof three times to fully develop its flavor and texture


What does it mean to proof dough 3 times?

CB

A: proofed to 3x the balled size or B: punched down 3 times before final balling. long story short, sounds like too much yeast/rising and a stopgap is being used to save the dough


also, northeastern PA pizza chain Vocelli's and sarpinos are using the same marketing company for their photos. i worked at 4 different vocelli's over the years, and i've seen all their marketing ads at some point in time.

« Last Edit: July 04, 2014, 12:24:54 AM by c0mpl3x »
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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2014, 12:34:02 AM »
Ok thanks. Marketing mumbo jumbo lies....probably jus a same day dough man.    ::)

cb
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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2014, 10:12:26 AM »
WarEagle09,

The Marco's dough and pizza would be difficult to reverse engineer and clone because some of the information is sketchy and there are no weights given for slices or entire pizzas. One would have to purchase a Marco's pizza (the best one for reverse engineering and cloning purposes would be the most basic pizza, such as a large cheese pizza), weigh the pizza, and estimate the losses during baking.

Having looked at the information for a large cheese pizza, and also what is otherwise said on the website (at http://marcos.com/about-marcos-pizza), and what I know about the PJ pizzas, this is what I take away from that review:

1. The flour used by Marco's is bleached, malted and bromated. Papa John's uses an unbleached, unbromated, malted flour.

2. Marco's appears to be using an oil blend comprising corn oil and pure olive oil. The blend is said to be "RBDD". I don't know what the last D stands for, but RBD usually stands for refined, bleached and deodorized. Papa John's uses soybean oil. I have no idea if that oil is RBD, but I have never seen anything to suggest that the soybean oil is RBD.

3. Marco's uses a Dough Additive that comprises sugar, salt and yeast. I suspect that is what is sometimes called a "goody bag". As discussed by Tom Lehmann in a Pizza Today article reproduced at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=7465.msg64349;topicseen#msg64349, it is common to combine sugar, salt and yeast in a premix. Such premixes are commonly used at the store level, and makes it easier for workers, including unskilled workers, to be able to make batches of dough without difficulty. Papa John's uses salt, sugar and yeast in its doughs but it is unlikely that they use goody bags at its commissaries.

4. Marco's uses three different fresh pack tomatoes to make its sauce. According to the ingredients list for the large cheese pizza, the tomatoes are said to be crushed tomatoes. If that is correct, then that would mean that Marco's uses three different crushed tomato products. Stanislaus has three different fresh pack tomato products that are described as crushed (see http://stanislausfoodproducts.com/products/nutrition-facts) but I would be surprised to see that they are the crushed tomatoes that Marco's is actually using. I haven't checked the fresh pack tomato products from Escalon, but Escalon could be a source of the crushed tomatoes used by Marco's (the Escalon link is http://www.escalon.net/products.aspx). Another possible source for the crushed fresh pack tomatoes is the Neil Jones Food Company. See, for example, http://www.neiljonesfoodcompany.com/types/crushed-and-ground-tomatoes/. Whatever the source of the tomatoes, it appears that Marco's adds water to the tomatoes, along with sugar and fructose. Papa John's uses a proprietary pizza sauce made for them by Stanislaus. Like Marco, the PJ pizza sauce is made from fresh pack tomatoes. The actual sauce composition can be seen at Reply 493 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg260046/topicseen.html#msg260046. There is no added water for the PJ sauce.

5. Marco's uses three fresh cheeses for its pizzas. However, the ingredients list for its large cheese pizza mentions cellulose. That would suggest anti-clumping. If one of the cheeses is a grated cheese, it is quite common for such cheeses to include cellulose. But, then, such a cheese wouldn't be characterized as "fresh".  So, it is possible that some grated cheese is put on top of the Marco's pizzas as a fourth cheese. All three (or four) Marco cheeses will contain cholesterol and be reflected in the Marco nutrition information. There is no cholesterol in the dough or pizza sauce. Papa John's uses a cheese blend from Leprino Foods. Its composition is given in Reply 493 referenced above.

6. A large pizza from either Marco's or Papa John's is 14" and is cut into eight slices. Comparing the nutrition information for a large cheese pizza from both companies, it appears that there is a bit more total fat and saturated fat in the Marco's pizza, about the same amount of cholesterol, a bit less salt (sodium) and more total sugars (natural and added). But it is hard to make much of these factors because total fat and sat fat are present in the dough (trace), in the cheeses, and in the oils. And sodium is just about everywhere: in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes and final sauce, in the dough, and in the cheeses. Dietary fiber is in the flour and in the tomatoes and to a minor degree in the cheeses. The sugars are in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes (natural) and in the sauce, and in the dough. Trying to allocate these nutrients to the various components of the pizza (dough, cheeses and sauce) is what makes reverse engineering and cloning pizzas such a challenge. The nutrition information for a large PJ cheese pizza can be seen at http://order.papajohns.com/nutrition.html.

It would help to know a typical weight of a baked large pizza from Marco's. That would help determine the "feel" of the pizza and slices from a weight standpoint, which might also provide clues as to crust thickness and dough weight.

Peter

Offline WarEagle09

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2014, 03:47:36 PM »
WarEagle09,

The Marco's dough and pizza would be difficult to reverse engineer and clone because some of the information is sketchy and there are no weights given for slices or entire pizzas. One would have to purchase a Marco's pizza (the best one for reverse engineering and cloning purposes would be the most basic pizza, such as a large cheese pizza), weigh the pizza, and estimate the losses during baking.

Having looked at the information for a large cheese pizza, and also what is otherwise said on the website (at http://marcos.com/about-marcos-pizza), and what I know about the PJ pizzas, this is what I take away from that review:

1. The flour used by Marco's is bleached, malted and bromated. Papa John's uses an unbleached, unbromated, malted flour.

2. Marco's appears to be using an oil blend comprising corn oil and pure olive oil. The blend is said to be "RBDD". I don't know what the last D stands for, but RBD usually stands for refined, bleached and deodorized. Papa John's uses soybean oil. I have no idea if that oil is RBD, but I have never seen anything to suggest that the soybean oil is RBD.

3. Marco's uses a Dough Additive that comprises sugar, salt and yeast. I suspect that is what is sometimes called a "goody bag". As discussed by Tom Lehmann in a Pizza Today article reproduced at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=7465.msg64349;topicseen#msg64349, it is common to combine sugar, salt and yeast in a premix. Such premixes are commonly used at the store level, and makes it easier for workers, including unskilled workers, to be able to make batches of dough without difficulty. Papa John's uses salt, sugar and yeast in its doughs but it is unlikely that they use goody bags at its commissaries.

4. Marco's uses three different fresh pack tomatoes to make its sauce. According to the ingredients list for the large cheese pizza, the tomatoes are said to be crushed tomatoes. If that is correct, then that would mean that Marco's uses three different crushed tomato products. Stanislaus has three different fresh pack tomato products that are described as crushed (see http://stanislausfoodproducts.com/products/nutrition-facts) but I would be surprised to see that they are the crushed tomatoes that Marco's is actually using. I haven't checked the fresh pack tomato products from Escalon, but Escalon could be a source of the crushed tomatoes used by Marco's (the Escalon link is http://www.escalon.net/products.aspx). Another possible source for the crushed fresh pack tomatoes is the Neil Jones Food Company. See, for example, http://www.neiljonesfoodcompany.com/types/crushed-and-ground-tomatoes/. Whatever the source of the tomatoes, it appears that Marco's adds water to the tomatoes, along with sugar and fructose. Papa John's uses a proprietary pizza sauce made for them by Stanislaus. Like Marco, the PJ pizza sauce is made from fresh pack tomatoes. The actual sauce composition can be seen at Reply 493 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg260046/topicseen.html#msg260046. There is no added water for the PJ sauce.

5. Marco's uses three fresh cheeses for its pizzas. However, the ingredients list for its large cheese pizza mentions cellulose. That would suggest anti-clumping. If one of the cheeses is a grated cheese, it is quite common for such cheeses to include cellulose. But, then, such a cheese wouldn't be characterized as "fresh".  So, it is possible that some grated cheese is put on top of the Marco's pizzas as a fourth cheese. All three (or four) Marco cheeses will contain cholesterol and be reflected in the Marco nutrition information. There is no cholesterol in the dough or pizza sauce. Papa John's uses a cheese blend from Leprino Foods. Its composition is given in Reply 493 referenced above.

6. A large pizza from either Marco's or Papa John's is 14" and is cut into eight slices. Comparing the nutrition information for a large cheese pizza from both companies, it appears that there is a bit more total fat and saturated fat in the Marco's pizza, about the same amount of cholesterol, a bit less salt (sodium) and more total sugars (natural and added). But it is hard to make much of these factors because total fat and sat fat are present in the dough (trace), in the cheeses, and in the oils. And sodium is just about everywhere: in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes and final sauce, in the dough, and in the cheeses. Dietary fiber is in the flour and in the tomatoes and to a minor degree in the cheeses. The sugars are in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes (natural) and in the sauce, and in the dough. Trying to allocate these nutrients to the various components of the pizza (dough, cheeses and sauce) is what makes reverse engineering and cloning pizzas such a challenge. The nutrition information for a large PJ cheese pizza can be seen at http://order.papajohns.com/nutrition.html.

It would help to know a typical weight of a baked large pizza from Marco's. That would help determine the "feel" of the pizza and slices from a weight standpoint, which might also provide clues as to crust thickness and dough weight.

Peter

The Marco's has actually yet to open, and I have never had it. I do not eat chain pizza often, and I am curious as to how it will compare to Papa John's. Also, doesn't Papa John's get their mozzarella from Leprino in diced form? I thought I remember reading cellulose in an ingredients list for Papa John's cheese also.

Also, I am personally curious if there is also trans fat in the ham and sausage I get from Walmart or Publix. That strikes me as odd, since supposedly the FDA is having the food industry eliminate PHO's, or at eliminate them to the extent that they are no longer reportable in a standard serving size.

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2014, 06:48:50 PM »
The Marco's has actually yet to open, and I have never had it. I do not eat chain pizza often, and I am curious as to how it will compare to Papa John's. Also, doesn't Papa John's get their mozzarella from Leprino in diced form? I thought I remember reading cellulose in an ingredients list for Papa John's cheese also.

Also, I am personally curious if there is also trans fat in the ham and sausage I get from Walmart or Publix. That strikes me as odd, since supposedly the FDA is having the food industry eliminate PHO's, or at eliminate them to the extent that they are no longer reportable in a standard serving size.
WarEagle09,

Yes, the PJ cheese from Leprino Foods is diced. And, as is noted in Reply 493 in my last post, the Leprino product includes cellulose. By contrast, Marco's cheese blend is said to be a proprietary, custom blend that includes mozzarella cheese and two other cheeses. I was not able to identify the other two cheeses but typical cheeses used in cheese blends include provolone, cheddar (usually white), Muenster, and a grated cheese (such as Parmesan or Romano). Marco's describes its three cheeses as fresh, and never frozen. By fresh, I believe Marco's means not frozen. When most cheese producers use the term fresh it usually means something like fior di latte or ricotta.

As for the trans fats in relation to ham and sausage, I looked at the nutrition information of several ham and sausage products at the SelfNutritionData website at http://nutritiondata.self.com/ and I did not see any trans fats for the ham and only small amounts (0.1-0.2 grams) of trans fats for about four ounces of sausage. Apparently, the sausage includes small amounts of natural trans fats.

I also looked at meat laden pizzas sold by Marco's, such as the Meat Supremo pizza. That pizza has "Classic Pepperoni, Ham, Italian Sausage, Bacon". I chose to look at the Nutrition Facts for the XLarge Meat Supremo pizza. That is a 16" pizza with 12 slices. What I found is that the entire pizza has zero grams of trans fats. I also looked at a similar meat laden pizza from Papa John's and the story there was the same. Zero trans fats for the entire pizza.

As for the PHOs (partially hydrogenated oils), food producers and users like the pizza chains have been trying to cut back on all hydrogenated oils, both full hydrogenation and partial hydrogenation. Their approach seems to be to use palm oil and related palm products, which do not have trans fats, and to combine them with fully hydrogenated oils and/or partially hydrogenated oils but in amounts such that the trans fats per serving are less than 0.5 grams. The FDA has been lobbying for larger serving sizes for many food products because too many people do not limit themselves to a single serving size (for example, the current serving size for ice cream is only one-half cup). It will be interesting to see what producers and users do if the serving size for pizza is increased. That won't happen anytime soon, if ever (there is some industry resistance), but if it does happen producers and users will have time to adapt again.

Peter

EDIT: After posting the above, I found a comment of a poster (Patrick) at http://www.urbanspoon.com/r/223/1722467/restaurant/Mobile-Bay/Marcos-Pizza-Gulf-Shores who reported that the three cheeses are mozzarella, Parmesan and Romano. Whether that is just the poster's opinion or based on harder evidence remains to be seen.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2014, 10:52:25 PM »
From the latest issue of Consumer Reports, August 2014:
Top 5 Pizza Chains by Reader score
1. Papa Murphy's  88
2. Jet's Pizza  83
3. Marco's Pizza  82
4. Round Table Pizza  76
5. Papa John's  76

Based on a survey of 32,405 subscribers and 96,208 dining experiences that took place between April 2012 and June 2013.
A score of 100 means all respondents were completely satisfied
A score of 80 means they were very well satisfied, on average
A score of 60 means they were fairly well satisfied.
The score reflects how well the chain did with respect to food quality, perceived value, politeness of staff, and speed of service.
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Offline paul711

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2014, 03:06:20 PM »
WarEagle09,

The Marco's dough and pizza would be difficult to reverse engineer and clone because some of the information is sketchy and there are no weights given for slices or entire pizzas. One would have to purchase a Marco's pizza (the best one for reverse engineering and cloning purposes would be the most basic pizza, such as a large cheese pizza), weigh the pizza, and estimate the losses during baking.

Having looked at the information for a large cheese pizza, and also what is otherwise said on the website (at http://marcos.com/about-marcos-pizza), and what I know about the PJ pizzas, this is what I take away from that review:

1. The flour used by Marco's is bleached, malted and bromated. Papa John's uses an unbleached, unbromated, malted flour.

2. Marco's appears to be using an oil blend comprising corn oil and pure olive oil. The blend is said to be "RBDD". I don't know what the last D stands for, but RBD usually stands for refined, bleached and deodorized. Papa John's uses soybean oil. I have no idea if that oil is RBD, but I have never seen anything to suggest that the soybean oil is RBD.

3. Marco's uses a Dough Additive that comprises sugar, salt and yeast. I suspect that is what is sometimes called a "goody bag". As discussed by Tom Lehmann in a Pizza Today article reproduced at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=7465.msg64349;topicseen#msg64349, it is common to combine sugar, salt and yeast in a premix. Such premixes are commonly used at the store level, and makes it easier for workers, including unskilled workers, to be able to make batches of dough without difficulty. Papa John's uses salt, sugar and yeast in its doughs but it is unlikely that they use goody bags at its commissaries.

4. Marco's uses three different fresh pack tomatoes to make its sauce. According to the ingredients list for the large cheese pizza, the tomatoes are said to be crushed tomatoes. If that is correct, then that would mean that Marco's uses three different crushed tomato products. Stanislaus has three different fresh pack tomato products that are described as crushed (see http://stanislausfoodproducts.com/products/nutrition-facts) but I would be surprised to see that they are the crushed tomatoes that Marco's is actually using. I haven't checked the fresh pack tomato products from Escalon, but Escalon could be a source of the crushed tomatoes used by Marco's (the Escalon link is http://www.escalon.net/products.aspx). Another possible source for the crushed fresh pack tomatoes is the Neil Jones Food Company. See, for example, http://www.neiljonesfoodcompany.com/types/crushed-and-ground-tomatoes/. Whatever the source of the tomatoes, it appears that Marco's adds water to the tomatoes, along with sugar and fructose. Papa John's uses a proprietary pizza sauce made for them by Stanislaus. Like Marco, the PJ pizza sauce is made from fresh pack tomatoes. The actual sauce composition can be seen at Reply 493 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg260046/topicseen.html#msg260046. There is no added water for the PJ sauce.

5. Marco's uses three fresh cheeses for its pizzas. However, the ingredients list for its large cheese pizza mentions cellulose. That would suggest anti-clumping. If one of the cheeses is a grated cheese, it is quite common for such cheeses to include cellulose. But, then, such a cheese wouldn't be characterized as "fresh".  So, it is possible that some grated cheese is put on top of the Marco's pizzas as a fourth cheese. All three (or four) Marco cheeses will contain cholesterol and be reflected in the Marco nutrition information. There is no cholesterol in the dough or pizza sauce. Papa John's uses a cheese blend from Leprino Foods. Its composition is given in Reply 493 referenced above.

6. A large pizza from either Marco's or Papa John's is 14" and is cut into eight slices. Comparing the nutrition information for a large cheese pizza from both companies, it appears that there is a bit more total fat and saturated fat in the Marco's pizza, about the same amount of cholesterol, a bit less salt (sodium) and more total sugars (natural and added). But it is hard to make much of these factors because total fat and sat fat are present in the dough (trace), in the cheeses, and in the oils. And sodium is just about everywhere: in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes and final sauce, in the dough, and in the cheeses. Dietary fiber is in the flour and in the tomatoes and to a minor degree in the cheeses. The sugars are in the flour (trace), in the tomatoes (natural) and in the sauce, and in the dough. Trying to allocate these nutrients to the various components of the pizza (dough, cheeses and sauce) is what makes reverse engineering and cloning pizzas such a challenge. The nutrition information for a large PJ cheese pizza can be seen at http://order.papajohns.com/nutrition.html.

It would help to know a typical weight of a baked large pizza from Marco's. That would help determine the "feel" of the pizza and slices from a weight standpoint, which might also provide clues as to crust thickness and dough weight.

Peter

I may be able to help you with alot of the information you are missing regarding Marcos Pizza's sauce and dough weights. I was a general manager for them for 17 years and have knowledge of their procedures. Sadly though the exact ingrediant list on their dough and sauce spice packs were never listed but I do have pictures that I will post showing how much water and other ingredients for both.

As for the dough we would mix 3 gallons of warm water into the 60 qt hobart bowl, add 3 1/2 cups of blended oil mix (what it actually says on the bottle but no ingredients), 47 1/2 pounds of flour which was an absolute must to be exact and Marcos yeast pack (1.65 lb) on top of the flour. We would turn the hobart on low setting and set the timer for 15 minutes in the summer and 18 minutes in the winter.  After which we would cut and roll them.... 10 inch dough balls 12 ounces, 12 inch were cut to 14 ounces, 14 inch were cut 19, and the 16 inch was cut to 25 ounces. Dough was wrapped with plastic and set in the walkin where it had to proof for a minimum of 8 hours but ideally we made day 24 hours ahead of time and it would be good for 72 hours.

I will post the sauce info when I get back from a graduation party as well as the pictures.

e

Offline tedcholl

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2014, 09:21:11 AM »
When I lived in Michigan there was a Marco's pizza nearby and I preferred it over Papa Johns.  What I liked most was they have 2 types of pepperoni, the second one was called Italian I believe - it is smaller in diameter and spicier and tended to curl similar to the Ezzo GiAntonio 38mm pepperoni that alot of people on the forum mention and that I have used myself.  Their pizza was the closest tasting pizza I could find to the Columbus, Ohio style of pizza that I grew up with.  They recently opened a restaurant in San Antonio which I visited once - too far away from where I live to go very often.

Offline rkrider99

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2014, 11:04:33 AM »
We have a Marco's at the entrance to our subdivision. Before I found this site and started making my own pizza, we ususally bought Marcos once a week.

I really like their thin and crispy crust. Crispy, yet tender. Reminds me of home (Chicago). Good sausage. I'll have to take a picture next time we order it. We don't order it very often anymore, the wife likes my pizzas better.

Tom



Offline shmigga

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2014, 10:28:46 AM »
From my experience, Marco's is the best chain pizzeria.  Compared to Papa Johns, it pretty much blows it away although that's not very hard to do.  There is just something about Papa John's that makes there pizza almost inedible.

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2014, 01:57:21 PM »
From my experience, Marco's is the best chain pizzeria.  Compared to Papa Johns, it pretty much blows it away although that's not very hard to do.  There is just something about Papa John's that makes there pizza almost inedible.
schmigga,

I personally think that it is the cheese. Papa John's says that it uses 100% mozzarella cheese (see http://www.papajohns.com.my/about-real-mozzarellacheese.html) but what they use is described at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58199#msg58199 and confirmed earlier this year at http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/03/12/update-on-papa-johns-vegetarian-and-vegan-menu-options/. The flour that PJ uses is made exclusively for PJ but it is a high protein flour, and no doubt a quality one. The sauce is made for PJ by Stanislaus and is based on fresh pack tomatoes, which are among the best tomatoes in the country. To me, that points to the cheese as the problem. And sometimes the conveyor ovens that PJ uses creates a mottled effect as components of the cheese blend burn from the top heat during baking.

You might want to make your own PJ clones. You can see some examples of PJ clones made by some of our members at Reply 683 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg292556#msg292556. You can even make your own clone of the PJ Mega-Chocolate Chip Cookie for dessert  ;D: Reply 642 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg285618;topicseen#msg285618.

Peter

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2014, 07:06:08 PM »
schmigga,

I personally think that it is the cheese. Papa John's says that it uses 100% mozzarella cheese (see http://www.papajohns.com.my/about-real-mozzarellacheese.html) but what they use is described at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58199#msg58199 and confirmed earlier this year at http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/03/12/update-on-papa-johns-vegetarian-and-vegan-menu-options/. The flour that PJ uses is made exclusively for PJ but it is a high protein flour, and no doubt a quality one. The sauce is made for PJ by Stanislaus and is based on fresh pack tomatoes, which are among the best tomatoes in the country. To me, that points to the cheese as the problem. And sometimes the conveyor ovens that PJ uses creates a mottled effect as components of the cheese blend burn from the top heat during baking.

You might want to make your own PJ clones. You can see some examples of PJ clones made by some of our members at Reply 683 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg292556#msg292556. You can even make your own clone of the PJ Mega-Chocolate Chip Cookie for dessert  ;D: Reply 642 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg285618;topicseen#msg285618.

Peter
Sorry ole dude but I must beg to differ.......Ok, right man....that cheap money makin cheese is crapola beyond compare....but if you scrape everything off that pie....therein you will see where the culprit lies.   :-X

Dat is sum funky, usually, under baked dough my pizza pals!!   :D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline shmigga

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2014, 03:16:01 PM »
schmigga,

I personally think that it is the cheese. Papa John's says that it uses 100% mozzarella cheese (see http://www.papajohns.com.my/about-real-mozzarellacheese.html) but what they use is described at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58199#msg58199 and confirmed earlier this year at http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/03/12/update-on-papa-johns-vegetarian-and-vegan-menu-options/. The flour that PJ uses is made exclusively for PJ but it is a high protein flour, and no doubt a quality one. The sauce is made for PJ by Stanislaus and is based on fresh pack tomatoes, which are among the best tomatoes in the country. To me, that points to the cheese as the problem. And sometimes the conveyor ovens that PJ uses creates a mottled effect as components of the cheese blend burn from the top heat during baking.

You might want to make your own PJ clones. You can see some examples of PJ clones made by some of our members at Reply 683 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg292556#msg292556. You can even make your own clone of the PJ Mega-Chocolate Chip Cookie for dessert  ;D: Reply 642 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg285618;topicseen#msg285618.

Peter

Peter,

I believe you may be right.  I really don't care for the cheese that Papa John's uses.  Perhaps if Papa John used a better quality cheese, then I would enjoy their pizza more.  I don't like to eat from chain pizzeria's, but since I have moved to Atlanta, I have no choice.  That being said, I have been really impressed with the Pizza that I have been getting from Marco's.  It's far from the quality of pizza that I am used to getting from Buffalo, but still better than Papa John's in my opinion.

Chris

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Re: Marco's Pizza opening in my hometown
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2014, 04:20:12 PM »
Peter,

I believe you may be right.  I really don't care for the cheese that Papa John's uses.  Perhaps if Papa John used a better quality cheese, then I would enjoy their pizza more.  I don't like to eat from chain pizzeria's, but since I have moved to Atlanta, I have no choice.  That being said, I have been really impressed with the Pizza that I have been getting from Marco's.  It's far from the quality of pizza that I am used to getting from Buffalo, but still better than Papa John's in my opinion.

Chris
The only way they sell so many pizzas at such, seemingly low , prices is because they use a$$ cheese.
The undercooked dough though is especially insulting!!
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"