Author Topic: Pizza Dough  (Read 2144 times)

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Offline MrandMrsca

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Pizza Dough
« on: October 29, 2006, 08:24:34 PM »
This is the recipe that we use all the time and would like someones input.  I usually make it and let it rise and use the same day.

1 Cup Warm Water
1 Teaspoon Sugar
1 Tablespoon Yeast

Mix sugar into warm water.  Sprinkle with Yeast.  Let sit 10 minutes.  Then mix to make sure all yeast is dissolved.

Add the following:
1/4 Cup Oil
1 Teaspoon Salt
2 1/2 to 2 3/4 Cups Flour, depends on day of how much I use.

Mix all ingredients together.  Knead dough at least 100 times.  Let rise until doubled in size.  Punch down and cover with your favorite toppings.  Bake at 400 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

I really like this recipe because it is easy.  Let us know what you think.  Email:  frasers@inetlink.ca


Offline chiguy

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2006, 08:50:31 PM »
 mrandaMrsca,
 It will make a pizza all the ingrediants are there. The hydration is about 60% which is normal but thats about it.  IT IS MORE ABOUT FORMULATION AND FERMENTATION than some secret recipe. Fresh ingrediants also can make a hugh factor.
 I can tell you that a pizza crust has much better flavor when given a much longer slow fermentation. This is done with lower yeast levels and cooler finished dough temperatures.
 The recipe you are using and formulation is not suitable for this and would need to be adjusted. Chiguy
 

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2006, 08:56:59 PM »
Thanks for your reply. Do you guys have any thoughts on how to make this better.

Offline mivler

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2006, 10:07:50 PM »
I would try cutting back the yeast to about 1/2-1/4 teaspoon. Stick it in the fridge for 3 days as soon as it is shaped into balls. On the day you pull it out of the fridge do not shape it (at all) for at least 2 hours. Let me know about the results.

Michael

Offline chiguy

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2006, 10:14:15 PM »
 MrandMrca,
 If you can tell what style of pizza you are trying to emulate.  A thincrust, N.Y. style, pan etc.. What is you're baking metod ?? On a stone, pan, screen?
 We can point you in the right direction...    chiguy

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2006, 10:15:33 PM »
thanks again we will try that. How are you guys comming up with the 60 % hydration, is there a formula for getting that number.
Again thanks for the updates we are glad we came acrossthis forum.

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2006, 10:24:01 PM »
We are just trying to create a great tasting pizza.  We like a medium crust and would love to try making a thin crust.  We bake on a cold stone.

MrandMrca,
 If you can tell what style of pizza you are trying to emulate.  A thincrust, N.Y. style, pan etc.. What is you're baking metod ?? On a stone, pan, screen?
 We can point you in the right direction...    chiguy


Offline mivler

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2006, 10:26:08 PM »
chicguy,

That's a good point. I made an assumption about what MrandMrsca was trying to produce.

MrandMrsca, also what type of flour are you using?

Michael

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2006, 11:06:26 PM »
hello we use all purpose. We use either co-op or robin hood flour.

Offline chiguy

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2006, 11:55:07 PM »
 MrandMrsca,
 My mistake about the hydraton being 60%, i misestimated. It is most likely at least 65%, on the high end for any type of flour. The hydration is calculated by weighing out all the ingrediants.Flour,water,oil,salt,sugar,yeast.(divide each ingrediant weight into the weight of the flour to get the % amount in the formula.
 The flour is always assumed to be 100%. You then take how much the water weighs and divide it into the weight of the flour. In your case its 1 cup of water(235grams) divided into 2 3/4Cups(343.75grams) of flour. It seems the hydration is more like 68%. I estimated the flour to weigh about 125grams per cup. If you are measuring the flour in a large measuring cup and tapping the cup as you measure you will most likly add additional flour as it packs down. With the accidental addition of the flour your hydration ratio for the water will likly go down maybe as much as 5%. This is probably the reason for the day to day changes in flour amounts and not the weather . This is also why many of us here use BAKERS PERCENTAGES in a recipe.
 I would also say that you should be preheating the pizza stone, raising the oven temperature and shorten the baking time.
 As far as thin crust pizza, the current formula you are using is not suitable for thin crust. The hydration(water% amount) of a thin crust tend to be 45-50%. You also have to develope the right THICKNESS FACTOR. I think the addition of a scale if you  don't have one can be a good addition to your pizza making technique.  Chiguy


Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2006, 08:39:24 AM »
Hi there and welcome to the group.

First thing you will want to do in future is pre-heat your stone.
So get your oven up to temp, and leave it there for 20 minutes at least, before
you throw your pizza onto the stone. Most of us pre-heat the stone for 60 mins, but if you
don't wish to wait that long, 30 mins should be fine.  Your pizza will like it better than going on a
cold stone.  When the stone is cold, it doesn't impart its magic
into the pizza dough.  When you buy a pizza from the local pizza joint, the pizza is pushed into
a hot oven, and the floor of that oven is very hot, which gets that dough baking right away.

For the recipe size, I'd use about 1/2 teaspoon of yeast, however I'm using IDY yeast ( Instant )
if you are using yeast that comes in the small bottles, then use 1 teaspoon.  This is also instant yeast
but is different from the stuff I have learned to buy from studying this great group.

I was buying small bottles of the instant yeast for just over $4 a bottle, and using WAY too much.

I'd also kick up your oven to 450 instead of 400 as you use.

Just for an example, this past weekend I made a good size amount of pizza dough using 2 cups of water,
and I used 1/2 a teaspoon of yeast, and the dough rose totally fine.  One thing you have to keep in mind
is that we are trying to make pizza dough, and not bread.  Your recipe would kind of be like pizza on
yeast steroids  ;D , and that's perfectly fine.

Save some money and cut that yeast down to 1 teaspoon and will see you still get great results.  I see
you are a Canadian as I am, so you already know about our high yeast prices  ::), now I never buy the
Flieshmann yeast in bottles, and buy 1 pound bags of yeast which is the same price as the bottle ! ( which
is 1/5 the size approx ) !

The only other thing I'd say is the amount of oil in your recipe is pretty high.  I used 3 tablespoon of oil
for 2 cups of water in the last batch I made. ( I'll be posting a link and images in another thread )
here's a peek of 2 pizzas I made using the dough I spoke of.  You can see that it has plenty
of yeast activity in it, eventhough I used only a bit of yeast.
http://www.detroitgrillking.com/frosty/oct-27-pizza/ ( Friday night pizza )
and
http://www.detroitgrillking.com/frosty/oct-28-pizza/ (Saturday night pizza )


This is the recipe that we use all the time and would like someones input.  I usually make it and let it rise and use the same day.

1 Cup Warm Water
1 Teaspoon Sugar
1 Tablespoon Yeast

Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2006, 09:33:07 AM »
I will try all suggests at our next pizza making session.  I was wondering what kind of sauce is used by Canadians.  I have never heard of the six in one sauce?


Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2006, 09:44:00 AM »
I have never found this in my area.  :(

I sometimes get lucky and find a very big tin of "pizza sauce" at my local Loblaws, for about $4, which is a great bargain, considering
pizza sauce in a bottle is $3 for a small jar, 1/30th the size ( those tiny bottles )

I will add oregano to mine, and also Italian seaoning, oh and  the secret ingredient all pizza makers use in Montreal,
which is a touch of cinnamon, not so much that you can tell it is cinnamon ( never overdo it ) they add just a bit in, to give it
that "je ne sais quoi " , where you know something is in there but you can't quite put your finger on it.

Edit: One thing I want to try is this..... my wife's parents in Montreal started buying pizza from a new pizzera in their area,
and I had it a few months ago while there.  There was a very nice "garlic" flavour to the sauce.

I am 99% sure, that this is not like a sauce that has been COOKED with garic, but rather, a sauce that has been made,
and then FRESH garlic is added ( very thin slices ) to the sauce once it is cooled....

This is going to impart a totally different fresh flavour of garlic, vs garlic that was cooked in the sauce.

On another note, we buy slices of pizza here, that has no cheese on it.  The pizza comes in squares, and is sold at
all grocery stores.  They use a very thick sauce on this pizza, it will never drip, it's deep red, almost like a pizza paste
type sauce.... anyway, itt's big at parties with the kids.  Well, this type of pizza in Montreal is made that way, and it never clicked
to me that I could try that in a pizza I baked in the oven.

Anyway, it's a great sauce they have, and the fresh flavour of garlic is really nice, yet NOT overwhelming.  It's amazing how
a great sauce can change a pizza, just as I always say, if you have a really great soup base,
anything tastes good in it, even a rock !  :P ( I have bought many of these no-name soup bases, and they just don't taste
great, and any veggies I put into them never taste great either, then you eat a bowl of Cambell's veggie soup, and everything
tastes great in it.... hence my funny saying about the rock in the soup )  :-D




I will try all suggests at our next pizza making session.  I was wondering what kind of sauce is used by Canadians.  I have never heard of the six in one sauce?


« Last Edit: October 30, 2006, 09:52:38 AM by canadianbacon »
Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline syed

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    • Pizza Recipe
i did not see yet
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2006, 02:35:04 AM »
hi
i think this is new form of pizza dough just b coz new ingredients involved in it i dont think it convert in to better pizza dough any comments on my thought

syed

Offline MrandMrsca

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2006, 09:03:28 PM »
Hello all we tried the suggestion that were put out here. There was a big differant in taste and texture. Cooking on a hot stone made it nice and crisp. I would love to show pictures but don't know how to put them on any advice on doing that thanks for your time.

MrandMrsca


 

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