Author Topic: Oil on neapolitan pizza  (Read 1900 times)

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Offline Arthur

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Oil on neapolitan pizza
« on: October 31, 2006, 02:31:12 PM »
What's the official usage of olive oil on Pizza Margarita?  I've heard "none" and then I do see things like this:
http://www.verapizzanapoletana.org/vpn/charter.html
that says olive oil.

I guess I'm looking for both "official" and common practice.

is olive oil used?
during mixing?
just as a cover over dough during rising?
after baking?
if so, extra virgin?

Arthur.


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2006, 02:48:01 PM »
Olive oil is never used in the dough. I have seen different kinds of oils drizzled on before and after baking. Not sure what is "official", but my personal preference depends on the quality of the toppings. If I have am using a really good fresh buffalo mozz and fresh tomatoes, I try not to add anything to get in the way of those simple but splendid flavors. Otherwise, I drizzle a small amount of quality extra virgin oil on at the end. You should try different approaches and see what you like, but if you're baking a real Neapolitan pie, don't put any oil in the dough.

Bill/SFNM


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2006, 02:50:43 PM »
Arthur,

What Bill/SFNM says is correct about not using oil in the dough. Many of your remaining questions are covered in different parts of this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,656.msg11509.html#msg11509.

Peter

Offline Arthur

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2006, 04:35:27 PM »
Thank you.  Very interesting.  I have (like I believe many forum members) coated the dough with a very small amount of oil but I believe that has had a negative impact on the dough.  A wet cloth during rising sounds better and then no oil during any additional rising.


Offline josteh

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2006, 06:11:51 PM »
Would a wet cloth do something to the overall dough hydration? -- is it probable that the dough will absorb some water? I tend to use a very a moist cloth to cover the doughballs during an overnight cold rise to avoid drying out the surface of the dough.

If going for the long cold rise, are there any guidelines for when to form the individual doughballs? I normally let the entire dough rest for 1.5-2hrs at roomtemperature (with a wet cloth) before forming the doughballs. After a coldrise I let the doughballs enjoy roomtemperature 2-3hrs before making the pizze. Any immediate consequences if forming the doughballs after the coldrise? 

 

Offline Arthur

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2006, 03:40:50 PM »
Another piece of the puzzle solved.  Don't ever use any oil on the dough - even to make sure it doesn't stick while rising in/out of fridge.  I finally got rid of my slightly brownish appearance in the crust of the dough to the more traditional neapolitan look.

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2006, 09:27:14 PM »
so how are you handling the stick issue? flour, none what?  I have been thinking aboutthis lately, and have seen flour in proofing boxes, both on bottom and on top. Does that mean the dough needs to start even wetter? and what do you mean by browning?  you had too much and now it looks more white?   -marc

Offline Arthur

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Re: Oil on neapolitan pizza
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2006, 09:54:21 AM »
Great questions since I'm not exactly sure of the answers  ::)

My dough does stick more in the plastic containers so I may need to larger containers where the top and the sides are not touching anything and it's just the underside that I need to scrape out.

As for browning I could certainly tell a difference in the resulting pizza with the crust.  With the oil the crust is brown and has a slightly different tecture.  Without the oil the crust is lighter.  Hmm...this is not making sense.  I need to show some pictures of my latest pies.  If you look here at my last pies you'll see some browness in the crust.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3919.msg33764.html#msg33764


so how are you handling the stick issue? flour, none what?  I have been thinking aboutthis lately, and have seen flour in proofing boxes, both on bottom and on top. Does that mean the dough needs to start even wetter? and what do you mean by browning?  you had too much and now it looks more white?   -marc