Author Topic: autolyse  (Read 2197 times)

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Offline artigiano

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autolyse
« on: November 01, 2006, 04:37:51 PM »
just wanted to thank you guys for teaching me about autolyse... i tried a 25 min autolyse for the first time, (70% of the flour by itself in the water) wow what a difference in air bubbles and and a nice airey and fluffy dough!  thanks everyone


Offline vitus

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2006, 05:13:06 PM »
I agree. It does make a big difference!  ;)

What kind of pizza did you make?

Offline artigiano

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2006, 03:27:10 PM »
as close to neaopolitan as i can get.. 60 percent all purpose flour, 40 percent pastry, water, fresh yeast and sea salt

Offline canadianbacon

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2006, 09:48:57 PM »
Maybe one of the senior members can explain what autolyse is for those who don't know, or have forgotten,
or kind of remember.  What is autolyse, and what does it do to the dough....

I'd appreciate a brief refresher course also, if anyone is willing.

Thanks in advance.

Mark


just wanted to thank you guys for teaching me about autolyse... i tried a 25 min autolyse for the first time, (70% of the flour by itself in the water) wow what a difference in air bubbles and and a nice airey and fluffy dough!  thanks everyone
Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2006, 11:10:52 PM »
Maybe one of the senior members can explain what autolyse is for those who don't know, or have forgotten,
or kind of remember.  What is autolyse, and what does it do to the dough....

Don't forget that this term and many, many other pizza-related concepts are explained in the glossary which you can get to from the home page of this site.

Bill/SFNM

Online Pete-zza

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2006, 07:54:16 AM »
Mark,

If you would like additional detail beyond what the Pizza Glossary provides, I think the following thread is one of the best on the forum on the subject of autolyse, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2632.msg22758.html#msg22758, especially the post by cocoabean at Reply 9. You should get a lot of credit for how that thread evolved because you were the one who started it.

Peter

Offline artigiano

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2006, 04:57:30 PM »
so is about 25 mins autolyse for 10 cups of flour sufficient?  does the amount of time increase with the amount of flour?  Also is autolyse for 60 or even 70 percent of the flour ok so then then the water and yeast mix can be added with the reamaining flour incorporated slowly for mixing?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2006, 06:30:52 PM »
artigiano,

It may well be that Professor Calvel's book LeGout de Pain answers the types of questions you raise but I have not been able to find anything that correlates autolyse rest time with flour (or dough) quantity. I have seen recommendations from 5 minutes (for a single dough ball) to 45 minutes, with most of the recommendations being in the 20-25 minute range, without regard to dough batch size. I have read that the chemical activity in a large dough batch is faster than in a small dough batch--a concept known in baking as the mass effect--so this implies that the autolyse process should take place faster in a large dough batch than in a small dough batch. That may be why the autolyse rest period tends to cap and possibly level off at some point. This is a topic that was discussed a while back at Replies at 489 and 490 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg30141.html#msg30141.

In your case, I would say that 25 minutes is reasonable for 10 cups of flour and whatever the final dough batch weight is when you add the water and remaining ingredients. Dividing the flour as you indicated should not pose a problem in my opinion.

Peter

Offline sqpixels

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Re: autolyse
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2006, 03:39:05 AM »
I just did my first autolyse last night and the dough is resting in my fridge now... will be making it over the weekend and I'm very excited to see how the dough turns out!