Author Topic: grandma pizza  (Read 25529 times)

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Offline PizzaBrasil

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2006, 10:27:35 AM »
May be the following comments, as long as the last mails about focaccia, will need to be changed to focaccia thread. Anyway, just to complete the information of the focaccia recipe under the Grandma´s title, I am posting in this thread.

I had received the Camaldoli and Ischia ferments from Sourdough and I am feeding in regular bases. This gave me a lot of preferment that I decided not to waste.

Since the member Buffalo show interest in the focaccia recipe, I did another batch in this weekend, all together with two marguerites (Ischia and Camaldoli ones)
Because I had a barbecue and some dessert pies in the Sunday, the wood oven was not fed and the focaccia and marguerites were baked in the home oven at 450°F (too low, but this is it)
To the focaccia I had used a combination between the Camaldoli, Ischia and Carl´s preferment biga, mixed with water, honey, a little pinch of IDY and salt, with percentages as in the recipe and corrected to 450 grams of preferment.  Soy oil was used in the dough and EVOO over it, just before baking.
The biga rests 12 hours on counter, the focaccia dough (after doing the recipe steps) rests in refrigerator for about 6 hours, deflated, refrigerated 1h and a last rest of 1h on the counter.
The focaccia dough was oiled and pre-baked by 15 minutes before topped with tomato sauce, buffalo mozzarella, a lot of chopped onions, oregano and sliced tomatoes and then baked by another 20 minutes, until the bottom was brown.
It had a great ovenspring when pre-baked and exceeds the 1.5 inches of the pan.
Due to low temperature of the oven the onion in the toppings did not acquire the clear brown color that I expected an was little undercooking. The buffalo mozzarella, the sauce, tomatoes and dough were ok.
The focaccia seem bread like, mainly by the great ovenspring obtained. Smooth, good smelt, good at all. Light years behind the similar one made in wood oven (900°F, 3 min baked).

Follow some poor pictures taken during the work.


Offline PizzaBrasil

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2006, 10:30:26 AM »
Last pictures

Luis

Offline Buffalo

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2006, 02:16:11 PM »
PizzaBrasil;

You have taken your level of expertise to that of ARTISAN.....I am truly impressed!  Are you self taught?  Did you go to school for this?  Did a friend teach you?  It is very apparent that you have a true "knack" for pizza making and I congratulate you on your abilities.
Buffalo :chef:

Offline mptpizza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2007, 02:36:35 PM »
Thanks for replies thus far. The Grandma pizza is different than the sicilian, particularly the crust, which is a bit thinner on the Grandma. The link to the discussion about how the Grandma is made is superb. I think probably the dough is a little thicker, but the same recipe.  Although Carlo claims nothing terribly unique, but quality ingredients, especially the oil it seems. Oiling the edges seems to give that nice extra crispy bottom, but the dough is so light and airy; how do they do that?

The homemade Cheese and sauce are just perfect; I always certain that they had to be doing this themselves, it could no be any commercial product.

Offline Jack

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2007, 06:03:00 PM »
but the dough is so light and airy; how do they do that?

My method - Once I've formed my, already room temperature dough to fit the pan, I let it sit, at room temperature for at least another 4-6 hours, so it can re-establish it’s texture.  I don't go heavy on the cheese, it's not needed, and the few dollops of tomato sauce don’t weigh down the crust.  I cook at 475°F for 16-18 minutes, which brings mine up to a light and airy 1.5 inch crust, just starting to brown on top and golden brown and crunchy on the bottom.  I use an all purpose or bread flour for this pie.  I once accidentally used KASL and after eating a single piece, I felt like I had swallowed a lead ball.  Yikes!

The hard part for me was getting a handle on how much olive oil (EVOO) to add around the edges of the pan.  In my eyes, when you can hear the crust sizzling as it fries, right before you remove it from the oven, you added enough oil.  I like to lightly deep fry some garlic cloves in the EVOO first, so it’s heavily garlic infused.  Yum!

Jack
« Last Edit: January 23, 2007, 06:04:41 PM by Jack »

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2007, 10:17:25 AM »
WOW!

Offline RoadPizza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #26 on: August 18, 2007, 09:37:06 AM »
I've been playing around with a Grandma's recipe lately and I wanted to share some pictures.  There's a lot of oil involved - it's almost like you're frying the pizza in the pan.

Offline scott r

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2007, 12:25:06 PM »
wow, that looks perfect.  Exactly like what i saw in Long Island.  The bottom pictured is just what we should all be shooting for.  Nice work!

Offline Bryan S

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2007, 01:43:58 AM »
I've been playing around with a Grandma's recipe lately and I wanted to share some pictures.  There's a lot of oil involved - it's almost like you're frying the pizza in the pan.

RoadPizza, That looks freaking fantastic.  :chef: What dough recipe are you using, and did you use 2 different kinds of cheese? Awsome job on that pizza.  8)
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 01:56:15 AM by Bryan S »
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.

Offline RoadPizza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2007, 04:22:45 AM »
RoadPizza, That looks freaking fantastic.  :chef: What dough recipe are you using, and did you use 2 different kinds of cheese? Awsome job on that pizza.  8)

I used our standard dough recipe (so you can easily use your normal dough recipe).  Only mozzarella was used. 

I remember Umberto's of New Hyde Park.  Their Grandma's Pizza was/is to die for.  I'm glad to at least come close with that pie.  I'm still practicing it before we roll it out later this year.


Offline RoadPizza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2009, 01:36:10 AM »
We started working on a round Grandma's pie.

Offline IEatPizzaByThePie

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2010, 12:33:46 PM »
Is authentic "Grandmother's pizza" typically made with Focaccia dough?

There's not much information about it. I'd like to see some actual authentic recipes as is used in New York pizzerias.
"I looked at the serving size: two slices. Who the hell eats two slices? I eat pizza by the pie! Two pies is a serving size!!"

Offline scott r

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #32 on: June 03, 2010, 02:11:37 PM »
 a normal new york style pizza dough is used for grandma style. Its just the pan frying and toppings that separate this from a typical NY style sicilian pizza. 

Offline sear

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #33 on: June 10, 2010, 02:34:45 PM »
wow, that looks perfect.  Exactly like what i saw in Long Island.  The bottom pictured is just what we should all be shooting for.  Nice work!

Hey scott, i live on LI.

what town were you in ? , remember the name of the pizza place ?

i would also add that the thickness of the Grandma slice is much less than that of a Sicilian slice, but a little thicker than a standard NY slice

Offline IEatPizzaByThePie

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2010, 09:01:41 AM »
Does anyone have a recommendation for a specific NY dough and technique to use for Grandma style?

I've tried a couple of different recipes, but it always turns out very similar to regular NY style. I would like to recreate the original Grandma pizza, as shown here: http://www.pmq.com/mag/2004march_april/secretrecipe.shtml
"I looked at the serving size: two slices. Who the hell eats two slices? I eat pizza by the pie! Two pies is a serving size!!"

Online Pete-zza

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #35 on: August 06, 2010, 11:27:58 AM »
You might check out the Chef Bruno video at
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H54jmWXPaMU" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H54jmWXPaMU</a>
for some clues. For example, knowing the weight of the dough (22 ounces) and using the surface area of the pan (which looks to be a half sheet pan), you can calculate the thickness factor of the skin. Then you might use a Sicilian or NY style dough formulation to make the dough.

Peter

Offline IEatPizzaByThePie

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #36 on: August 08, 2010, 11:20:55 AM »
You might check out the Chef Bruno video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H54jmWXPaMU for some clues. For example, knowing the weight of the dough (22 ounces) and using the surface area of the pan (which looks to be a half sheet pan), you can calculate the thickness factor of the skin. Then you might use a Sicilian or NY style dough formulation to make the dough.

Peter


I have checked out that video in the past, but it doesn't go into recipe details.

I think Grandma pizza is made with a dough that is a variation of NY style, except it might take more oil and less yeast. Instead of reinventing the wheel, I was hoping someone already had a recipe that worked good for this style.

Thanks for your help, though.
"I looked at the serving size: two slices. Who the hell eats two slices? I eat pizza by the pie! Two pies is a serving size!!"

Offline norma427

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #37 on: August 08, 2010, 11:36:56 AM »
IEatPizzaByThePie,

I don’t know if this will help you are not, but here is where I made a grandma’s pie. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10284.msg91453.html#msg91453 You can see the ingredients I used there.  It turned out very good in my opinion, but it wasn’t round. If you decided to try out this formula you wouldn’t have to add the durum flour.  I was just experimenting with that. You also could use a higher thickness factor if you want the grandma’s pizza thicker.

Norma
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Offline PizzaHog

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2010, 01:01:54 PM »
After not baking a pie in months thanks to the heat, a visit from guests from Brooklyn requesting pizza forced my hand - finally!  I made a NY street, Detroit style and had to try one of these although I never personally ate one myself.  Some changes will be made on the next one but it was pretty good as it was and one Brooklyn guest said the crust was way close although a bit thinner than the norm.
The tomatoes were standout excellent even though a deviation from authentic.  I picked up some fresh Roma's from the Farmer's Market and roasted them off first with garlic and a little OO then peeled them.  Wow!  I wish I had roasted more and will next time.  Thanks to Norma for her posts on this idea!

Offline norma427

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Re: grandma pizza
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2010, 01:06:53 PM »
After not baking a pie in months thanks to the heat, a visit from guests from Brooklyn requesting pizza forced my hand - finally!  I made a NY street, Detroit style and had to try one of these although I never personally ate one myself.  Some changes will be made on the next one but it was pretty good as it was and one Brooklyn guest said the crust was way close although a bit thinner than the norm.
The tomatoes were standout excellent even though a deviation from authentic.  I picked up some fresh Roma's from the Farmer's Market and roasted them off first with garlic and a little OO then peeled them.  Wow!  I wish I had roasted more and will next time.  Thanks to Norma for her posts on this idea!

PizzaHog,

Your Grandma's pie looks delicious!   ;D Wish I could have been there to try a slice.  You did a great job.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

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