Author Topic: Chuck E Cheezes pizza training video  (Read 1344 times)

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Offline ghost

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Chuck E Cheezes pizza training video
« on: November 02, 2006, 08:54:46 PM »


Hilarious!


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Chuck E Cheezes pizza training video
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2006, 09:47:28 AM »
I can't believe I watched all 17+ minutes (parts 1 & 2) of this old training video. I thought the ethnic stereotype of the narrator was coarse and offensive, but the content was interesting. The pizza didn't look like anything I would want to eat, but what most registered with me was the number of steps and the moderate precision involved in the process. I know little about commercial pizza operations, but the potential for botching it up seemed high. I would guess that high-volume chains have to dumb this down quite a bit.

Bill/SFNM

Offline AKSteve

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Re: Chuck E Cheezes pizza training video
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2006, 11:19:27 AM »
I hate to say it, but I actually enjoyed that. I know it's chain-store pizza, but if they followed every step properly, it probably wouldn't taste too bad.

Does anyone here ever let their crust proof after they've formed it? I go from forming to baking as quickly as possible. Then again, I don't press my dough. I hand stretch it so it isn't really flattened out that much. I was just wondering if letting it sit for a while would lead to an airier crust.

Steve

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Chuck E Cheezes pizza training video
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2006, 12:08:48 PM »
I was just wondering if letting it sit for a while would lead to an airier crust.

Steve,

It should. In fact, it is common practice for some pizza operators who make deep-dish doughs and some thin-crust doughs to proof their doughs before dressing. Usually, though, sheeters are used, which degasses the doughs, making proofing a requirement in most cases in order to get an airier crust.

Peter


 

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