Author Topic: Pizza hearth/stone question  (Read 323 times)

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Offline tulip

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Pizza hearth/stone question
« on: September 03, 2014, 04:19:23 PM »
Hi all, I'm looking for some advice. I used a pizza oven once. Here is my blog about it to get you up to speed: http://www.tuliplandscaping.com/blog/2014/8/17/landscaping-and-pizza My question is how long should this be preheated and what is the best way to preheat the stone. The tops of the pizzas were cooked very nicely but the bottom was underdone and I like that well-done bottom crust that is a little crunchy and dark. Any advice is much appreciated! -Ben from Olympia, WA


Offline shuboyje

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2014, 06:04:01 PM »
There is so much wrong with that oven I wouldn't know where to begin giving you advice on using it.  The no brainer way to know when to cook in a functioning pizza oven is to use a IR thermometer.
-Jeff

Online mkevenson

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2014, 06:15:49 PM »
Tulip, welcome to the forum. To make things easier on yourself it is beneficial as shuboyje wrote, to use an IR them to measure the floor temp and dome temp. Looking at your oven it appears that you did not build your fire on the surface that you cooked your pizza on. I believe most folk who use a WFO build their fire on the floor and when the floor is sufficiently hot they move the fire to the side wall. In this way the floor you cook on will be hot. Frequently the floors are so hot that the pie is lifted off the floor and held near the dome to finish top cooking.
Perhaps if you told us your method of stove heating it may help us give other suggestions.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2014, 07:40:37 PM »
Pretty sure it is not his oven from the way the blog reads, I would have been more gentle if it had been.

Tulip, as I said there appear to be multiple issues with that oven, but the biggest one as it related to you issue is all that exposed perlcrete.  Perlcrete absorbs water like a sponge, and once wet you will never get the oven hot until it dries out.  Having an entire oven covered in it, and parts of the oven made of it, exposed to the elements is a nightmare situation if you want to cook pizza in that oven.  It's clear to see the oven is not hot by the amount of soot it is covered in.  Once an oven is hot the soot will burn off, commonly called the oven clearing. 
-Jeff

Online Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2014, 08:44:57 AM »
I am pretty sure that is the same stuff Firerock produts are made of (it probably is a firerock product).  It may have some perlite in it, but it primarily expanded shale.  Still a poor oven design.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2014, 09:41:26 AM »
Yep, same stuff as those modular fireplace kits.  They aren't designed to stay as is, but to be covered with veneer or stucco.
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When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
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Offline stonecutter

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Re: Pizza hearth/stone question
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2014, 09:49:28 AM »
I thought it looked like ISO-cal  and I found the PDF.

http://earthcore.co/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/ISOven_04-2011-Install2.pdf

From the staining on the face of the vent, it doesn't look like it draws well at all. Not a good chamber design either.
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin