Author Topic: Refractory casting tip  (Read 533 times)

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Offline shuboyje

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Refractory casting tip
« on: March 08, 2014, 01:03:51 PM »
Today I was casting some refractory pieces for a small experimental oven I am working on and came up with  A tip I wanted to share.  A few years ago I built a vibration casting table when I built my last oven.  Today I went looking for the 1/2 hp motor that runs it and can't remember where I put it.  In a jam I came up with a quick easy solution that worked great.  I took a cheap electric drill and put the largest Allen key that would fit in the chuck short end first.  Instant vibration, worked as good as my huge old setup.
-Jeff


Online Tscarborough

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2014, 01:23:28 PM »
That or an orbital sander.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2014, 01:43:48 PM »
Or a reciprocating saw.   I've used those for architectural cast pieces that weighed 1200lbs.
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2014, 02:49:56 PM »
I've tried that and reciprocating saws in the past.  Neither gets the refractory moving.  The ks4v plus I use is a really dry mix, it takes some real mass behind the vibration to get it to move.
-Jeff

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2014, 03:07:30 PM »
Whatever works for you best matters most,  but your reciprocating saw must have been weak.  The pieces I was taking about had gauged crushed stone and reinforcement in them, and our saw shook the air right out of the form, and it had the minimal amount of water added...a bit on the dry side.
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When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin

Offline dogboy

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2014, 03:13:14 PM »
I'd like to see more on the refractory ovens and building 5 hem yourself.
I am a bricklayer and am looking into ways to make a mold for building some wfo's.  I know I can build a brick oven but I want to try something diffrent.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2014, 03:16:13 PM »
+1

I looked up the product you are using, there is an H-W distributor a couple hours away from me down here.  Any insight on how their castable holds up?
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2014, 08:20:55 PM »
Maybe it is the stainless needles that cause the issues vibrating, but it takes a lot to get this stuff flowing.  If you ever go the castable route report back how the vibration casting goes, I'd be curious to hear another persons experience.  I'm confident of the strength of my reciprocating saw, how do you use the saw to apply the vibration?

On to the Refractory.  From my understanding talking with the staff at H-W when I'm there it sounds like their products are used by all the major industries here in Detroit.  In my personal experience the other day I jumped up and down on a 1" thick arch I cast in 2011 WITHOUT stainless needles in it, and it didn't break. 

I choose to use KS4V-Plus for multiple reasons.  H-W always has stock on hand.  It is a lower duty rating then a lot of their stuff, but far above what we need for pizza ovens, and it is by far the cheapest dense castable I have found.  In small quantities I pay $0.57 a pound.  My oldest castings have been in use since 2011, have rolled around on casters, were heat tempered imprecisely in place, been through brutal Michigan winters exposed to the elements and still don't have a single crack in them.

As I've mentioned a few times here I use a high percentage 409 stainless needles that I buy from Hi-Temp on ebay.  None of my local suppliers stock them but high temp sells at a good price and can fit 10 pounds in a flat rate box.  I use 5% by weight of the dry castable.  KS4 has a yield of 125 lbs/cubic foot.

-Jeff

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2014, 08:39:10 PM »
Maybe it is the stainless needles that cause the issues vibrating, but it takes a lot to get this stuff flowing.  If you ever go the castable route report back how the vibration casting goes, I'd be curious to hear another persons experience.  I'm confident of the strength of my reciprocating saw, how do you use the saw to apply the vibration?

On to the Refractory.  From my understanding talking with the staff at H-W when I'm there it sounds like their products are used by all the major industries here in Detroit.  In my personal experience the other day I jumped up and down on a 1" thick arch I cast in 2011 WITHOUT stainless needles in it, and it didn't break. 

I choose to use KS4V-Plus for multiple reasons.  H-W always has stock on hand.  It is a lower duty rating then a lot of their stuff, but far above what we need for pizza ovens, and it is by far the cheapest dense castable I have found.  In small quantities I pay $0.57 a pound.  My oldest castings have been in use since 2011, have rolled around on casters, were heat tempered imprecisely in place, been through brutal Michigan winters exposed to the elements and still don't have a single crack in them.

As I've mentioned a few times here I use a high percentage 409 stainless needles that I buy from Hi-Temp on ebay.  None of my local suppliers stock them but high temp sells at a good price and can fit 10 pounds in a flat rate box.  I use 5% by weight of the dry castable.  KS4 has a yield of 125 lbs/cubic foot.

Thanks, I might cast a small oven for haha's, in between another elliptical I have planned.     
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin

Offline dogboy

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2014, 11:57:22 AM »
How would using a clay flu liner work as a brick oven? Just wondering if I were to cut one and put it together with fire clay and insulate could this work or would it break under the heat?


Offline stonecutter

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Re: Refractory casting tip
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2014, 03:04:17 PM »
How would using a clay flu liner work as a brick oven? Just wondering if I were to cut one and put it together with fire clay and insulate could this work or would it break under the heat?

It wouldn't last long, and there is very little mass to be of any use.
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin