Author Topic: How much rise?  (Read 1485 times)

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Offline holdem

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How much rise?
« on: January 01, 2007, 12:31:17 PM »
I'm making the "original" dough recipe. How much should the dough raise in the fridge? Thanks.


Offline chiguy

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2007, 02:22:56 PM »
 Not sure what the original recipe you are referring?  With a retarded/refridgerated dough the two important factor that determine the rate of fermentation are yeast% and finished dough temperature.
 Although a retarded dough can be used in as little as 12-15hours it may be better to use  24 hours as a good starting point. Again this is all relative to the yeast% and the finished dough temperature among other things.   Chiguy

Offline holdem

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2007, 04:46:33 PM »
I used the recipe from the home page of this website. I have had it in the fridge going on 24 hours.

Offline chiguy

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2007, 05:38:33 PM »
Holdem,
 If you are referring to the New York Style Pizza recipe on the home page than it appears the recipe is self explanatory.  Place in fridge 24 hours let warm up for 1 1/2 hours and bake the pizza.
 Although i do not think you will have much of a problem using warmer water in the winter but you may have to temperature adjust the water to achieve a cooler finished dough temperature. Also the recipe calls for InstantDryYeast which we all know does not need to be activated with warm water. In fact it can be added right to the dry ingrediants.
 If N.Y. style is what you want keep reading posts in the N.Y. section. Also you may spend some time at this thread started by our celebrity member Pete-zza.
 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.0.html
                                                                  Chiguy

Offline November

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2007, 05:40:05 PM »
holdem,

Since there are nine recipes on the front page of this site, I can only assume you mean the "Thin & Crispy Pizza Recipe" since it's the only one with the term "original" in the description.  If that's the one, it says in the instructions: "Retard dough a full day (24-hours) in the refrigerator (38 F to 40 F)."  If you are following the recipe and instructions to the letter, it shouldn't matter how much the dough rises while in the refrigerator.  If you're not sure you followed everything exactly, generally speaking, cold fermentations display very little rising.  If you have what could be described as a small weather balloon for dough after 24 hours, something went wrong.

- red.november

Offline holdem

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2007, 08:04:46 PM »
My dough didn't rise any. It was kind of in crumbles. Very hard to roll. My first try at making my own dough. The worst pizza I've ever made. I must of done something wrong.

Offline November

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2007, 08:08:49 PM »
holdem,

Would you be so kind as to end the suspense? What was the name of the recipe you used? There are nine recipes linked to on the front page.

Offline chiguy

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2007, 08:38:17 PM »
 Sounds like the Thin & crispy, or the cracker crust. I am not surprised by the crumbly mess.
 The hydration on these recipes are just too low 36-37%. I believe 45% hydration is considered the low end for pizza crusts. This % may be flexable with additional oil but not much. Maybe with some experience you may have sucess with these recipes. Although a pizza dough should not be a crumbly mound.
 In my experience with thin crust it is better to keep the hydration a bit higher(50%) and use a longer bake at lower temps.    Chiguy

Offline holdem

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Re: How much rise?
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2007, 09:19:36 PM »
It was the thin and crispy recipe.


 

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