Author Topic: Randy - A request for you  (Read 9479 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2007, 06:04:11 PM »
CDNpielover,

I assume you are referring to November's tool at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. Since November knows the assumptions and math he used to devise the tool, I will defer to his explanation of those factors. However, I believe he based his calculations on straight-sided measuring cups. And he used a default value of 2.243" (depth) for his 1-cup measuring cup. My 1-cup measuring cup is different from his. It is 1 3/4" deep. In addition to my straight-sided measuring cups, I also have a different set of measuring cups that are sloped with different top and bottom diameters. I may be wrong, but I don't think the tool is intended to be used with such measuring cups. But there is little doubt in my mind that there are many different types of measuring cups, and measuring spoons as well. Some measuring spoons aren't even round. Maybe in a laboratory somewhere there is such a thing as a "standard" set of measuring cups and spoons, but not in the home.

I think it would be highly irregular that one would only have a 1/2-cup measuring cup to measure out quantities of flour. That's not to say that one won't get acceptable results, but the measurements will not be accurate. November's tool provides accuracy and is flexible enough to allow one to use the measuring cups and spoons on hand to convert weights of ingredients like flour (including the KASL) into volume measurements. In my case, for example, my set includes 1 cup, 1/2 c., 1/3 c., 1/4 c., 1 T, 1 t., plus lesser size measuring spoons. As long as I enter the correct cup depth as called for by the tool and select the measuring cups and spoons I have available to me (by checking/unchecking the boxes), the tool will convert weights into volumes using my specific set of measuring cups and spoons. If I got this wrong, I'm sure November will correct me. November's tool also accommodates several types and brands of flour. Different types of flours have different compaction dynamics and the tool takes those differences into account. It is an ingenious tool. So ingenious, in fact, that I think I threw husker3in4 off stride by asking for his measuring cup measurements. No doubt he thought I was loony.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 08:24:27 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline November

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2007, 06:43:24 PM »
CDNpielover, Peter,

Actually, 2.243" is an average from several sets of measuring cups, and falls in line with statistical probabilities based on manufacturing trends.  At a certain point, having an excess diameter decreases the number of measuring cups that can be nested within the one-cup measuring cup, thereby increasing packaging costs.

The tool does report more accurate numbers if the walls are straight, but even if the walls are tapered, the user will still receive reasonable results.  After all, tapered walls simply move the effective (mathematically speaking) diameter down from the top of the cup toward the bottom, so it's all still an assumption.

The fact is, only a one-cup measuring cup depth will suffice with this calculator because of how it calculates the other cups involved.  It's a part of the nesting equation I eluded to.  If your measuring cup set didn't come with a one-cup measuring cup, don't worry about the depth, just use the defaults.

"No doubt he thought I was loony."

And that's part of why I added the default values.  ;D

- red.november

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2007, 10:02:15 PM »
Wow this thread is getting more and more confusing as it gets bigger, lol. My measuring cup (or 1/2 cup) is just a simple round cup with a handle on it. I'd say its a little more than an inch deep, but I dont know exacts. All I know is the recipe rocked! My kids didnt try it yet, I made up 4 pizza's on sunday, 2 of randy's recipe and 2 of Peetzza's version of Tom Lehmann's NY pizza that I have been making for a month or two. My kids already approve of Peetzza's recipe, but I wanted to test out Randy's on the guys that came over to watch football (I only get my kids every other weekend). Everyone liked both types of pizza. I dont know if it was because it was free for them, or if they really thought it was exceptional, lol. But, I will say Peetzza's recipe turned out great like it always does, and Randy's also turned out great.  I couldnt be more pleased with the crusts, I will give Randy's sauce recipe a go and test the crust and the sause on my kids this weekend.

Also, I already have some penzey's seasoning,  you can see the bottle in my second pic in the background :)

When you say squeeze the garlic clove, can you tell me what you mean? Like squeeze it in my fingers then drop it in the saucepan?

I sure am glad it worked for you.  On the sauce, a good sauce for this type of pizza is easy if you get some penzeys pizza spice.  They have a few stores around the country but you can order it online also.  Penzeys has a lot of good spices and their blends are fantastic.  Of late I use mostly Walmart great Value crushed tomatoes and they are a ver close second to 6-in-1

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyspizzaseas.html

1 28 oz. Can 6-in-1 tomatoes ground and peeled
2-tablespoon olive oil
2-teaspoon Penzey's Pizza Seasoning
1-teaspoon sugar
1 Garlic glove squeezed
¼   teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon basil
Pinch of thyme
Pinch of cayenne

 Combine spices and oil in a small saucepan and heat for a couple of minutes until the aroma rises from the panadd the garlic stir  then add tomatoes and heat for 15 minutes on medium-low heat.
 
Optional in place of 6 in 1 use one  Walmart Great Value crushed tomatoes28-ounce can. These are surprisingly good.


Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2007, 10:26:37 PM »
I use a garlic press to squash the clove but if you don't have one then crush the clove with the side of a knife blade or finely chop it or both.  That should work.

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2007, 12:54:36 AM »
Thanks, will give it a go!

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2007, 12:06:08 AM »
Hi again, I made another batch of your dough and cooked up a batch of your sauce tonight. I will bake the pizza's using the sauce on Sunday. The dough came out a bit stickier (pretty wet) than the first time  I made it, although I swear I measured everything just the same. Should be ok?

I was thinking, how do you think it would come out if I used this same recipe thats made for two 12" pizzas and make one 14" pizza? Would it be super thick? or still good? My oven wont take a 16" screen, I have been using a 14" screen. I might give it a go and see what happens :P

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2007, 02:36:37 AM »
husker3in4,

I don't think you want to make a single 14" pizza using the amount of dough for two 12" pizzas. By my original calculation, two 12" pizzas use 28.50 ounces of dough. The corresponding thickness factor for what you propose to do is around 0.185. For comparison purposes, a "thick" pizza has a thickness factor of about 0.12-0.13. So, your 14" pizza would be so thick that you may not be able to properly bake it. If you want to make a 14" pizza and retain the same characteristics as Randy's recipe, you need 19.40 ounces of dough. With a total of 28.50 ounces, that leaves 9.1 ounces. With that 9.1 ounces, you can make a single 9.6" pizza, or a bit less than 10". If you don't have a scale, you can cut the total dough ball (28.50 ounces) into roughly 2/3 and 1/3 pieces and you should come pretty close. Both pizzas should have essentially the same characteristics. If you have a 14" screen, you can use it for both the 14" and roughly 10" pizzas.

Peter

Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2007, 06:51:49 AM »
I agree with Peter.  Do you have more than one screen?

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2007, 07:27:18 PM »
Hi guys, no I just have the one screen, but it wouldnt be a problem to pick up another. There is a local retail supply store in town and they have a variety of screens and I think the 14" screen was around $7. I could pick another one up, how hard would it be for you to make measurements in cups etc for two 14" pizzas? Im happy with the two 12" pizza recipe, and will be testing it on my kids tomorrow. If you get around to it, two 14" recipe would be cool to try too.

Thanks again guys :)

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2007, 07:59:58 PM »
husker3in4,

Just to be absolutely clear, are you talking about the recipe Randy posted at Reply 7?

If so, if Randy has the weight measurements for flour and water for his recipe it should be fairly easy to convert the recipe to baker's percents and determine what you need for a 14" dough ball. If Randy does not have those measurements, I will have to use my best estimates.

Peter


Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #30 on: January 21, 2007, 09:08:56 AM »
Husker, Peter I would suggest using the same recipe just strech it a little further to say 13".  That would give you a little space on the screen to pick it up with.  You may like it a bit thinner.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #31 on: January 21, 2007, 09:43:49 AM »
Randy,

If that works for husker3in4, that's fine by me. However, if he would like me to take a cut at coming up with a 14" dough formulation that has essentially the same characteristics as the 12" pies he has been making, I don't mind attempting the conversions. I just want to be sure I am working with the right recipe.

Peter

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #32 on: January 21, 2007, 11:21:17 AM »
Hi guys, yes I used randy's in reply #7. It was just easier for me to understand. I dont think I would like stretching to 13" on that same recipe, I dont want it to be thinner, a touch thicker would be ok tho.

Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2007, 12:10:12 PM »
The hard part husker is making it work with the equipment you have.  Lets see if this doesn't work.  This increases the recipe by half but I made some changes to make it easier for you.  The same instructions should apply except this time you are using two 14" screens

9 half cup scoped and leveled High Gluten Flour

3 half cup of room temperature water (plus one to two tablespoons if needed)

2 Tablespoon  raw or turbindo sugar

1 TBS  Honey

1 Tablespoon  plus 1 teaspoons Classico Olive Oil

2  Teaspoon Salt

2 teaspoons SAF Perfect Rise or Gourmet yeast or bread machine yeast

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #34 on: January 21, 2007, 11:30:11 PM »
Hi again, I will give that new recipe a try tomorrow. I tried randy's sauce recipe, it did turn out nicely. A bit strong on the garlic, maybe next time I will use 1/2 clove, but tasty nonetheless. Thanks!

Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #35 on: January 22, 2007, 06:28:32 AM »
Hi again, I will give that new recipe a try tomorrow. I tried randy's sauce recipe, it did turn out nicely. A bit strong on the garlic, maybe next time I will use 1/2 clove, but tasty nonetheless. Thanks!

That surprises me to no end husker, because the garlic content of this recipe is relatively low.  Two things come to mind. One if you burned the garlic and the second is the size of the garlic clove.  When I crush a typical garlic clove it makes 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of crushed garlic.

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2007, 06:40:31 PM »
Yes that surprised me too. It didnt seem like alot of garlic, especially compared to the 29 ounces of crushed tomatoes I poured on top of it. I doubt I burned it. Once I pressed the garlic into the pan, I poured the crushed tomatoes on top and stirred immediatly. The clove seemed normal size, maybe it was just a super strength one? I will try half a clove next time. I do like the recipe tho, take away the overpowering garlic and it tasted like pizza sauce and smelled like pizza sauce. A definite improvment over my past sauce efforts, always tasted like tomatoe soup.

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2007, 12:31:22 AM »
Quck question Randy, your Sauce recipe calls for GV crushed tomatoes, when I went to wal-mart today for some other things, I noticed there were 2 types of GV crushed tomatoes.. One was Concentrated Crushed tomatoes, the other was Crushed tomatoes in puree. The Crushed in puree had bigger chunks of tomatoes but also listed citric acid in the ingredients. The Concentrated Crushed only listed "crushed tomatoes" in the ingredients.

Which is the one you buy for your recipe?

Offline Randy

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2007, 06:37:13 AM »
Crushed tomatoes in puree.
On garlicA clove is one piece from a head of garlic but if that is too strong you may want to try it without garlic .  It will still be tasty.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2007, 06:41:33 AM by Randy »

Offline bolabola

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Re: Randy - A request for you
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2007, 08:41:46 PM »
husker..I've really enjoyed reading your thread and in the beginning I hated all those %s and weights too but have gotten use to it..
I also know that garlic can be somewhat tuff on kids if not growing up in an Italian family..
the trick is to let your garlic sweat on a low heat in olive oil before adding your tomatoes..if not done enuff it tastes to strong and if burn't it tastes acidic..right when the garlic seems to be releasing it's aroma add a small splash of white wine or water and then turn up the burner..this steams off the harsh garlic smell and adds just a hint of garlic flavor..then add your tomatoes..
in this house garlic powder has always been banned..fresh is so much better.. 
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