Author Topic: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?  (Read 8876 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3102
  • Age: 44
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2007, 04:27:41 PM »
if the starter is cared for properly you can probably get away with feeding it a small amount about once a month.  There is no need to keep huge quantities in your fridge since it will grow when you prepare it for baking.   If you keep your starter fairly stiff, more like a dough, you can probably even get away with waiting even longer between feedings.  I don't think it is much work at all even if you bake infrequently.

I start with about 150 grams of starter and feed that 40 grams of water and 65 grams of flour.  Those small quantities are fine for my purposes since I use a very small amount of starter in my actual dough recipe.   Someone like Bill SFNM or Jeff Varasano would probably need larger amounts on hand because they use much more starter in their dough.  Bread recipies also use much more starter, so you could double or even triple my amounts.

I feed my starter caputo, but King arthur bread flour or GM harvest king flour would also be great for your feedings.   Basically any unbromated flour should work fine, but you should probably stick to one brand.

Once you are done using your starter just feed it then wait about an hour before it goes back in the fridge.   When it is time to feed again pull it out, stir in the hooch if there is any, pour 150 grams into a sterilized plastic or glass container and feed the 40g of water and 65g of starter.  This will be a stiff starter so it will take some elbow grease to mix, but that will allow you to feed fairly infrequently.


Offline LabRat

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 21
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2007, 04:29:06 PM »
I usually only have about 300 grams of starter (equal weight flour and water) on hand at a time which I keep in the refrigerator in a sealed gladware container.  Generally I try to make something once a week, but I have let it go for up to four weeks between feedings with no problem.  When I want to bake some bread, I just weigh out 200 grams starter and mix in 200 grams water and 100 grams flour in to my KA mixing bowl and let it sit overnight loosely covered.  The starter I use is replaced with equal weights filtered water and whatever unbleached/unbromated flour I have on hand (usually not the expensive stuff), allowed to warm up for a few hours so the microbes can get busy, then placed back in the fridge with the top on tight.  The next day the mixture in the KA bowl is usually nice and frothy and I can just weigh out the rest of my ingredients and go from there.  I have heard of people forgetting about their starter for months and being able to revive it in this manner, but have not done so myself.  

Offline ml

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 25
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2007, 03:55:33 PM »
Peter,

Well, I had another setback with the new starter-- it failed, and I had to begin yet again, on Wednesday eve. I think I made a fatal error by having it too warm, and also I can't remember exactly what I used to seed  my original successful one.  Since I promised to post my results with your new method, using pre-ferment and IDY to compare, I just wanted to keep you updated on my schedule.  I will be able to tell you on Monday whether the new one is a GO, or not.  If it is, then I should be making the 2 doughs early next week.  By the way, I recieved the 6 in 1 tomatoes, and also I received Caputo Russo flour ( which I won't be using for the pizza)  I was suprised with the flour, that when you feel it between your fingers, it seems a little gritty.  Has anyone else noticed this?  It is Tipo 00, 13% protien.   My Gold Medal unbleached flour feels very soft and silky in comparison,

ML

Offline ml

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 25
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?
« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2007, 07:14:16 PM »
Peter,

Another update, which is the starters still are not working.  There must have been a serious decline in yeast organisms in my kitchen since December.  Anyway, I'm still working on it with intentions to make the 2 doughs as soon as I have a viable starter.  Mr Reinhart is very kindly assisting me with my problems, so eventually success will be had!  I didn't want you to think that I had forgotten!

ML

Offline icemncmth

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 42
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: wild yeast starter for pizza crust?
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2007, 11:28:31 PM »
ML, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I am not sure your starter will totally recover from freezing.  I have been reading a bunch on the subject and it is tough to tell the fact from fiction, however...  I am almost positive that there are certain organisms in most starters that can be frozen, and other organisms that can not recover from a freeze.   I did some experimentation with the ishca starter (from sourdo.com) and it was definitely not the same after a freeze of only a week.  I hope your strain is one that will deal with the freeze better.

I have actually been avoiding sending some of my starter to a family member that wants it until the weather warms up again.   



The best way to send some to your family would be to dry some of yours when it is really going well ..just put some on wax paper set it someplace and let it dry..I just put mine in the oven (off) for a day...then you have dry yeast..All you have to do is hydrate and feed some flour..

As for freezing ..you can freeze a starter but it has to be a really active starter..One that has been fed every 2-4 hours for 12 hours...one that will double in size in less than an hour...

I use a starter for pizza all the time...but I do something different...

I only use about 7 grams of starter...and adjust the hydration...then I let it sit in the fridge for several days...I you have a very active starter you don't need much if you have the time...I think when it comes to pizza people use a little too much starter...

If you have a starter like I do that is probably 60 years old (been passed around in the family for years) and is very active and you use the standard 1 cup
rule ...and add that to a pizza recipe..it would be like adding a cups worth of the yeast you currently use. Because if it is active and bubbling then the yeast is multiplying at a very fast pace and your dough will be ready in no time..

I will do this if I need a pizza dough ready in hours but you won't get the same taste...

Remeber if you use a lot of yeast and even if you stick it in the fridge for too long....the waste product of yeast is alcohol or in the sourdough community "hooch".

I only feed my starters probably once a month..I pull them out of the fridge...dump off the blackish hooch...mix in my 60% flour 40% water 1/4 cup total..
wait till I see some action...when I see it going well...feed again 1/4 cup..(usually 2 hours) I do this until I have whatever volume I need..

When I am done I only have about 1/4 in the fridge or less..
I have all my starters dryed and in the freezer..I do this about every six months just to make sure and I keep some at my mom's place just in case...

When you make bread and you use a starter you can very the time of proofing...by using smaller amounts of yeast...cold...or both...


 

pizzapan