Author Topic: my DLX repair experience--with photos  (Read 3251 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
my DLX repair experience--with photos
« on: January 10, 2007, 01:28:51 AM »
The third time I used my DLX, the motor started sounding much louder than normal.  I could tell something had gone very wrong.  I called "Mr. Roth," of Royalux (Magic Mill USA) in New Jersey--the single main importer and servicer of Magic Mill products in North America--and asked for help (see this thread for my description of the problem, and Mr. Roth's contact info): http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4330.0.html

He knew exactly what the problem was, and shipped me a replacement part--a bracket for the motor.  He told me I could phone him when I received the part for instructions on how to replace the part, but I went ahead myself and did it anyway.  This is what I did.

First off, I placed the mixer on its side and opened it up.  As you can see from the first photo in the sequence, the bottom part has four feet (each with its own screw), and two screws at the very back by the power plug.  To open the mixer, you only need to remove the screws in the front two feet, plus remove the two screws at the back by the plug.  You can leave the screws that are attached to the two back feet alone; they do nothing to hold the mixer in place.

By the way--although the screws look like they need an Allen key wrench to open them, that's not what they are.  They're "TORX screws" (thanks Jack for the correction, from later in this thread!) which require "TORX bits" to move them.  A TORX bit looks sort of like a star when it's pointed right at your eyes.  It's not a common bit--these are the first screws I've ever run across that use such a bit--but they seem to be included with most decent-sized bit sets, so you shouldn't have a problem.

When I opened the mixer, I could immediately see that Mr. Roth was correct in his guess as to the problem.  The metal bracket holding the motor in place was severely bent at an extreme angle; it should be flat.  To be honest, I was very surprised that Electrolux chose such a light-duty metal for what is actually a rather important piece, and a piece that must withstand some stress at that.  I was not impressed--how hard would it have been for them to make the bracket out of a stronger-duty steel?

Also, Mr. Roth claimed this damage is almost always attributable to shipping.  I find that VERY hard to believe.  How would a screwed-in bracket suddenly bend akimbo without any damage to any other surrounding machinery?  Besides, the mixer is shipped in a big box with standard styrofoam packing that immobilizes it; how would such damage occur just to the bracket?  And ALWAYS just that bracket?  And if the bracket is always getting damaged "due to shipping"....maybe they should consider improving the design of the bracket?  ::)  *sigh*  I think it's just a bad design--the metal needs to be upgraded to something much stronger.  In fact, I'm a little worried that continued usage of the mixer will eventually damage this new bracket in exactly the same way.  It's easy enough to repair, but it's a pain having to cross my fingers that nothing bad befalls my mixer.

Anyway, back to the repair:

1. After the mixer is opened, unscrew the two screws on either side of the bracket that hold it in place.  The motor is now loose, and the rubber belt from the belt drive should become slack.  You'll need to loop the belt up and over so that the bracket can be lifted off.

2. Next, put the new bracket in place and put the rubber belt back in place.  Remember that the screw holes for the bracket are ovals, not circles that fit the screws perfectly; you'll need to tighten the new screws in the proper part of the ovals so that the belt drive will be taut again.  A slack rubber belt will mean that the motor won't run properly--it has to be taut.

3. Close up the mixer and you're done!

Not so hard.  If you can handle a screwdriver, you can do this.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2007, 12:23:14 PM by canadave »


Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: my DLX repair experience--with photos
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2007, 07:43:57 AM »
I think you and Mr. Roth are both right.  If the motor has no support on the other end of the motor then any rough handling and the bracket will bend from the torque the unsupported end of the motor puts on the bracket.  The motor needs more support either beefing up the bracket or supporting the other end of the motor.  I will bet the designer had a cushion in the bottom cover that the factory left out.
Great job on the photo shoot.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2007, 07:47:27 AM by Randy »

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
Re: my DLX repair experience--with photos
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2007, 10:09:23 AM »
Thanks Randy :)  Actually, it's funny you shine the spotlight on the other end of the motor; the DLX is actually designed to be stood on its side, and the "other end" (the bottom of the motor in these photos) is designed to be used for accessories like a meat grinder or juicer.  The other end has a plastic cover that can come off in such situations.

But that end, as you surmised, doesn't have ANY bracket.  In fact, when I was replacing the bracket and trying to shove the motor assembly downwards into its proper place so that I could re-screw the bracket into the screw holes, I wasn't able to easily, because the bottom hole kept resisting--and it was doing that because I was trying to essentially shove the motor "into my countertop."

It's not a very good design internally, that's for sure.  Unless you keep your DLX in one spot and leave it there, I highly recommend to DLX owners that you avoid any undue stress on the motor (now that we know exactly where the assembly is) when moving it from the kitchen shelf to the workspace and back; I don't like the chances of it withstanding repeated moves back and forth.

Offline Jack

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 404
  • Location: WA
  • Pizza; it's what's for dinner, breakfast........
Re: my DLX repair experience--with photos
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2007, 10:22:41 AM »
Good job on the repair.  I can believe the damage starts in shipping, especially if the unit is shipped with the motor horizontal.  Once that bracket is slightly deformed, the regular stress from a heavy dough, will cause some movement of the motor in the bracket.  Once it there is some free play, it will continue to deform the bracket, until the bracket "lets go" adn moves to the limit of the motor's travel, as it did on yours. 

FYI - "torque screws," should be TORX.  They are a much better fastener than a similar screw because the star shaped drive applies maximum force from the driver to the screw, without much chance of stripping or slipping out.  They are surprisingly common in automotive and industiral applications.

Jack

Offline PizzaPolice

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 435
  • Location: N/W Indiana
  • WFO-Where Art & Physics meet - Heat is the Arbiter
Re: my DLX repair experience--with photos
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2007, 10:36:50 AM »
Way to GO Canadave!  Nice job. 

If they are of mind to beef up the bracket, it would be nice to see them fill in the underside of the swing arm.  10+ pounds of dough and it crawls right up into the swing arm void.  It's a pain to clean and a definite sanitation issue.

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
Re: my DLX repair experience--with photos
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2007, 11:43:04 AM »
Jack: thanks for correcting me on the screw name; I didn't know what it was called until a buddy of mine who works in a garage told me what it was.  He didn't write it down, so "torque screw" was what it sounded like  ;D  TORX makes sense though :)

PP: YES, I totally agree with you about the underside! :0  I noticed that last night for the first time when I made my dough batch.  Again--sort of a minor annoyance, but it's the worst kind of annoyance--one that really doesn't need to be there.  It wouldn't be much trouble, I wouldn't think, to fully enclose the swing arm.  Did no one think that food would come up to the level of the swing arm, when they designed this thing?

I hate to sound negative, because the DLX really is a terrific machine.  Just these weird design quirks that drive me crazy :)


 

pizzapan