Author Topic: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature  (Read 3113 times)

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Offline pizzanapoletana

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Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« on: January 11, 2007, 04:03:02 PM »
I wanted to open a new thread about this topic. I do receive numerous private question about this, thus I thought to cover it here so that can people can freely discuss this issue.

Well, Neapolitan Ovens are built with the best possible materials for cooking pizza in a commercial environment. Yes they produce their best with Authentic Pizza Napoletana, where these can cook pizza in 45-60 seconds continuously over hours and consuming the minimum fuel necessary. This is achieved thanks to the materials, the geometry and dimensions as well as the particular insulations and building technology.

Having said that, these ovens can cook other type of pizza as good if not much better then any other oven option (certainly more efficiently then a coal oven). This comes down to fire management in the oven and maintaining the desired temperature over time. As a matter of fact, the oven in the picture below, has started producing pizza before it was really cured. Because of this we were not able to push up the temperature and could only achieve 2-4 minutes pizza (depending of the warming up stages).
Trust me, those pizza were better but very close to what Totonno and Grimaldi serves in NYC and much better then Lombardi, Patsy's or John's.

Also these ovens can be used to bake the most wonderful bread you can think of. In a commercial pizzeria (as the one where the oven below is), the morning after a full night pizza service (up to 23.00 hrs) the same oven can still bakes 2 batches of bread from 8 to 10 am.

Please do ask more if you have doubts.

Ciao


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2007, 05:01:22 AM »

Also these ovens can be used to bake the most wonderful bread you can think of. In a commercial pizzeria (as the one where the oven below is), the morning after a full night pizza service (up to 23.00 hrs) the same oven can still bakes 2 batches of bread from 8 to 10 am.


Beautiful oven, marco! You guys should be extremely proud - a work of art.

And don't forget that other kinds of food are also great - there are unlimited uses for that residual heat. Yesterday, after baking pizzas, I cooked a lamb saddle roast (maybe just a tad overcooked for my taste, but very, very good none the less.)

Bill/SFNM


Offline AKSteve

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2007, 11:15:49 PM »
Do you use the same recipe for lower temps as you do for 1,000 oven temps? The reason I ask is that I went to a pizza place in a little town called Homer, Alaska earlier this week and had the best pizza I've tasted so far in Alaska. They had an italian wood burning oven operating at 1,000, but my pizza was cooked in their gas oven at about 600. It tasted fantastic, with just the slightest bit of dry chewiness to the outer crust that probably wouldn't have been evident if it had been cooked more quickly in the hotter oven.

I asked about which oven they use for pizza and the answer was that they kind of mix & match based on how busy they are. There's not a lot of room in the wood burning oven, so I got the feeling that most of their pizza's were cooked in the gas oven, especially the larger pies. I always thought that the recipe for the dough would be completely different for a gas oven vs, a hotter, wood-burning oven, but it looked as if they were using the same dough balls for both ovens.

In case anyone cares, the pizza place was called The Fat Olive. I'd almost bet money on the owner being from Seattle or having worked at Pagliacci's pizza in Seattle as their crust tastes almost identical.

I thought their pizza sizes were interesting, too: 12", 18", & 26". I wish they weren't 225 miles away from Anchorage, as I really want to try a 12" cooked in the wood oven.

Steve

Offline scott r

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2007, 11:25:32 PM »
a dough formulation made for a cooler oven can usually make great pizza at higher temps.  The opposite is usually not so good.

Offline AKSteve

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2007, 11:42:32 PM »
Unless it has sugar/honey in it, right? My pizza recipe with honey in it scorches rather than browns at temps above 650 or so.

Steve

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza Oven and cooking at lower temperature
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2007, 09:29:59 AM »
Do you use the same recipe for lower temps as you do for 1,000 oven temps?

Steve

My OWN dough is designed to give the maximum at the highest temperature of a Neapolitan oven.

My point was more like: If you have a lower temperature "recipe", you can still baked in a Neapolitan oven managed to a lower temperature.

Scott also made a good point above: The same lower temperature recipe should perform even better at higher temperature.

Ciao