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Offline Boy Hits Car

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New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« on: January 22, 2007, 02:10:37 PM »
Hey All,

I'm planning a New York pizza tasting tour for this Sunday and need some recommendations.  Right now I plan to hit the following places:

First Choices:
DiFara's Brooklyn
Totonno's Brooklyn
Luzzo's Manhattan
Una Pizza Neapolatana Manhattan
John's Manhattan

Alternates:
Grimaldi's Brooklyn
Patsy's Manhattan
Naples 45 Manhattan

Any suggestions of where to go instead of the above listed?  Should I go to one or more of the alternates instead of some of my first choice places?  I've already tried Lombardi's and is why I don't list it here.  Thanks.

Mike


Offline canadave

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2007, 03:32:23 PM »
You've hit most of the big ones.  I personally would also suggest adding some "street" pizzerias to your list.  My personal favourite was Ben's on W. 3rd St. and MacDougal.  That's just a block and a half from the new Joe's (the classic old Joe's closed not too long ago) on 6th Ave and Carmine.

If you're into names, the supposed "real Ray's" (probably not, actually, but the urban legend *says* it's the real one) is not too far from those two places, at 6th Ave and 11th Street.  I never liked it though, it always had mountains of cheese and actually never really tasted all that interesting to me--pretty bland, IMHO.

The great thing about these pizzerias (or any other one, really, other than the big "elite" pizzerias) is that they're quick, cheap, and easy.  Just walk in, order a slice or two, and you're eating in 2 minutes, for about $5.00 or so with a drink.  And the pizza, while not the charred marvels that you'd get from a brick/coal oven pizzeria, is generally really good--sometimes even better.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 03:34:04 PM by canadave »

Offline scott r

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2007, 06:14:10 PM »
Anupam Chandola (559 HA ’95) and his company will be helping his friend Roberto Caporuscio with the final touches to what will be one of the best Pizzerias in the US. “Mano caio Roberto” will be opening in Ridgewood, NJ at 24 Franklin Ave. Click to read more about this report sent to us by Anupam.

Anupam Chandola (559 HA ’95) and his company will be helping his friend Roberto Caporuscio with the final touches to what will be one of the best Pizzerias in the US. “Mano caio Roberto” will be opening in Ridgewood, NJ at 24 Franklin Ave. The opening will be on the 10th of December 06. If you are looking for great Neopolitan pies and amazing disserts, take the 20 min trip from New York City to Ridgewood. It will be well worth it.

The restaurant will seat 100+ and will serve true Neopolitan Pizzas, salads and Hand Made Desserts and Gelato. The layout is true to an Italian Pizzeria with the Brick Ovens dominating the center. Every piece of building material used in the aesthetics of the restaurant was imported from Italy. From the wall tiles, to espresso bar, from the chairs and tables to the oven bricks, were imported from Italy. Even the huge brick pizza ovens were handmade from scratch by artisans who were flown in from Italy. The idea was to replicate an Italian Pizzeria 100%. All the food ingredients used are also imported from Italy.


Based in Pittsburgh, Restaurateur Roberto Caporuscio was invited to concoct his light-as-air pizzas at Naples 45 Ristorante on Park Avenue in New York. Among the crowd of 50 gathered to taste the special Neopolitan pies was NY food critic Ed Levine. A month later, Roberto says, "He called me and said, 'Can you please send a pizza to New York?" So Roberto whipped up his signature "Regina Margherita," -- with its fresh tomatoes, fresh basil and mozzarella di bufala -- froze it and spent $60 to ship it
overnight to Levine.

Last month Levine's book, "Pizza: A Slice of Heaven," landed in bookstores, marking the 100th anniversary of the nation's first licensed pizzeria, and on its list of America's 13 best pizzerias is Roberto's Pittsburgh restaurants, Regina Margherita and Roberto’s Pizzeria.

With Original locations in Pittsburgh, the Ridgewood, NJ location will add to the reach of Roberto’s signature pies. Future plans are to open several more locations in NJ and NY. In the next year they will likely open a location in Anupam's home town of Wexford, Pennsylvania.

You can e-mail Anupam at chandola@connecttime.net
Read more about Roberto Caporuscio Pizzas. http://www.post-gazette.com/dining/20020517dinec5.asp

Anupam Chandola (559 HA ’95) and his company will be helping his friend Roberto Caporuscio with the final touches to what will be one of the best Pizzerias in the US. “Mano caio Roberto” will be opening in Ridgewood, NJ at 24 Franklin Ave. Click to read more about this report sent to us by Anupam.

Anupam Chandola (559 HA ’95) and his company will be helping his friend Roberto Caporuscio with the final touches to what will be one of the best Pizzerias in the US. “Mano caio Roberto” will be opening in Ridgewood, NJ at 24 Franklin Ave. The opening will be on the 10th of December 06. If you are looking for great Neopolitan pies and amazing disserts, take the 20 min trip from New York City to Ridgewood. It will be well worth it.

The restaurant will seat 100+ and will serve true Neopolitan Pizzas, salads and Hand Made Desserts and Gelato. The layout is true to an Italian Pizzeria with the Brick Ovens dominating the center. Every piece of building material used in the aesthetics of the restaurant was imported from Italy. From the wall tiles, to espresso bar, from the chairs and tables to the oven bricks, were imported from Italy. Even the huge brick pizza ovens were handmade from scratch by artisans who were flown in from Italy. The idea was to replicate an Italian Pizzeria 100%. All the food ingredients used are also imported from Italy.


Based in Pittsburgh, Restaurateur Roberto Caporuscio was invited to concoct his light-as-air pizzas at Naples 45 Ristorante on Park Avenue in New York. Among the crowd of 50 gathered to taste the special Neopolitan pies was NY food critic Ed Levine. A month later, Roberto says, "He called me and said, 'Can you please send a pizza to New York?" So Roberto whipped up his signature "Regina Margherita," -- with its fresh tomatoes, fresh basil and mozzarella di bufala -- froze it and spent $60 to ship it
overnight to Levine.

Last month Levine's book, "Pizza: A Slice of Heaven," landed in bookstores, marking the 100th anniversary of the nation's first licensed pizzeria, and on its list of America's 13 best pizzerias is Roberto's Pittsburgh restaurants, Regina Margherita and Roberto’s Pizzeria.

With Original locations in Pittsburgh, the Ridgewood, NJ location will add to the reach of Roberto’s signature pies. Future plans are to open several more locations in NJ and NY. In the next year they will likely open a location in Anupam's home town of Wexford, Pennsylvania.

You can e-mail Anupam at chandola@connecttime.net
Read more about Roberto Caporuscio Pizzas. http://www.post-gazette.com/dining/20020517dinec5.asp


Offline scott r

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2007, 06:16:15 PM »
You are going to have SO MUCH FUN! I wish I could do another one of these pizza marathons right now. All of these are just my opinions after a number of visits to the pizzerias of NY. You may have a different experience than I did. I have been shocked at how a place can be the best of one trip, only to be one of the worst places on my next visit to the city, so some of how your taste buds will be rewarded will have to do with a bit of luck. It must be hard to make a consistent product in a commercial pizzeria.
 
 First Choices:

 Mano caio Roberto
 Luzzo's Manhattan
 Una Pizza Neapolatana Manhattan
 Grimaldi's Brooklyn
 Patsy's HARLEM
 Totonno's Brooklyn
 
 Alternates:
 Sezz Medi
 John's Manhattan
 DiFara's Brooklyn
 Naples 45 Manhattan
 
I wouldn't bother with Di Fara's if you are a plain pizza kind of guy. The crust is not very good because it is only fermented for a few hours at an elevated temp. If you are a toppings lover you will like it. I don't understand all the hype other than the beauty of watching an old master, but it is possible that I have been there on a bad day.
 
I have been to Naples 45, but I did not actually eat the pizza.   I would put Sezz Medi along with it as a decent version of a Neapolitan pie, but for a pizza closer to the real thing you should just go out to Mano in NJ.  I have had roberto's pizza before, and it was not stellar, but this new place has the right ovens and mixer which I know will take his pies to another level. 
 
Whatever you do don't go to 28 Carmine. I know it's not on your list, but I am finally coming out of my shock and able to speak about this place.
 
John's is OK, really good cheese, but if you are going to make it to totonnos and grimaldi's you will probably have a very similar pie with a better crust. I feel like Lombardi's, Totonno's, John's, and Grimaldi's are all pretty much the same deal, with Grimaldi's having the most consistently good crust of the bunch.
 
UPN is it's own thing, and the only pizzeria where you will find a pie made with wild yeast.  His pizza usually has tons of flavor even without any toppings.
 
Luzzo's has the textured crust in NYC, but the cheese is rubbery and bland. Still, you should definitely experience the crust.
 
Patsy's in Harlem may have the second best textured crust to luzzo's, and definitely some of the best sauce in the city.
 
« Last Edit: January 23, 2007, 01:18:56 AM by scott r »

Offline David

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2007, 06:24:16 PM »
Mano caio Roberto ?

When did it open?When did you go Scott?
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Offline scott r

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2007, 06:32:03 PM »
Roberto is making pizzas in Ridgewood, but he is not officially open yet. If you stop by you can probably get a pizza.  The grand opening is scheduled for the end of Jan.  I have not been to Mano, but I did have his pizza at a Caputo sales event here in boston, and at the NY pizza show (with you!).
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 06:48:58 PM by scott r »

Offline tommy

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2007, 01:10:05 PM »
i've been following the opening of A Mano in Ridgewood (NJ) for a while now.  I had no idea until I read this thread what the story was.  My understanding up until yesterday (reading this thread) was that it was simply a brick oven pizzeria connected to the Italian market (Jerry's) next door.  It's great to hear that it has the chance of being exceptional.

They might very well be open by Sunday.  I stopped in today and was told that they're hoping to be open in a few days.  I wish I got a phone number so you could call if you're considering it, although I assume you'll stick to NYC places since you've only got one day. 

Thanks scott r for posting about this place.  I can't find anything else online about it.  I'll be posting updates on my blog (which I'm not allowed to post a link to since I'm a "New Member"...edit:  but i can put it in my profile, so you can click on the globe) if any non-local people are curious as to the progress and pics of the ovens (and pizza).
 
« Last Edit: January 24, 2007, 01:34:27 PM by tommy »

Offline canadave

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2007, 01:50:51 PM »
Whatever you do don't go to 28 Carmine. I know it's not on your list, but I am finally coming out of my shock and able to speak about this place. 
Scott,

Just out of curiosity, what was so bad at 28 Carmine?  I went there for the first time last year (it's across the street from where I used to live) and the pizza was pretty good...the people were pretty nice.  Was your experience the opposite?

Offline scott r

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2007, 03:22:01 PM »
Canadave, I actually wrote up a post about my Christmas pizza thon to NYC and San Fran, but I ended up not posting because I am starting to feel guilty about slamming pizzerias. As I am sure we all know here it is very possible to make a bad pie every now and then. I think PFT put it perfectly when he said "pizza is just like golf. Nobody ever plays a perfect game, and everyone has a bad day every now and then". I am going to try to refrain from talking about the other bad pizzas I had on my trip, but what happened at 28 carmine was inexcusable.
 
I ordered pizza for delivery because the recording studio I was working at was only two blocks away, and if I order food through the studio record label pays for it. I was working with a bunch of vegetarians, so we ordered a veggie pizzas, a plain pizza, and I ordered a salami pizza.  >:D   I was not really planning to judge the pizza since it was delivery, but as things turned out it was 1.5 hours before the pizza arrived. The pizza was at least an hour old. Now this is not really acceptable, but we were hungry and I decided to just make the best of it. I opened my salami pizza and it was horrible. Totally dried out, no flavor to the cheese or crust. The vegetarians opened up their pizzas and they had a sausage and another salami pizza.
 
Well, at least I knew why the pizzas took so long. They had screwed up the order, and I figured it was probably the delivery guy's fault. My assistant that works for the studio insisted that we send the pies back and that we should have just ordered Arturo's.
 
Carmine apologized and sent over a guy with new pizza's to replace the wrong order that we received. I couldn't help but wonder if there was someone out there looking for a sausage and two salami pizzas.
 
What ended up coming looked nice and fresh, and was there in 20 min. Nice!
 
Nice, until I got into the second slice of my (also dry and flavorless pizza) and found a strange substance in my mouth. It was a piece of plastic melted into the cheese. It seemed like the type of plastic that is wrapped around the cryo pack dry but "fresh" mozzarella found in the super market.
 
We just decided to give up and order arturos, which was much better, but still at the bottom of the list of places that I tried during my stay in NYC. They had good sauce and cheese, but the dough was tough and bagel like.

Offline canadave

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2007, 05:45:29 PM »
Scott,

Wow...that would definitely turn me off of a place!  :o  Sorry to hear you had such an awful experience (twice). 

For what it's worth, my experience there was totally different.  They were nice (in fact, if anything, with an almost insipid eagerness to please), and the pizza was absolutely delicious.  I had a fantastic time there.  And here's someone else's review of the place, from sliceny.com, which was closer to my experience than yours.  I'm not sure any of that would be enough to make me go back after reading about plastic wrap in the pizza though!
http://www.sliceny.com/archives/2006/01/review_no_28.php

Incidentally, your appraisal of Arturo's pretty much sums it up as far as I'm concerned.  Interesting trivia note--a few years ago, at the prodding of one of my friends who worked at Arturo's as a delivery guy, I played music for about an hour with the longtime troubadour who's there on weekend nights.  It was a scary experience (I'd never been "on stage" before), and I've pretty much forgotten everything about it (blocked it out of my mind), except that I enjoyed eating the pizza afterward, bland crust and all :)  As you say, the sauce and cheese were really good!
« Last Edit: January 24, 2007, 05:50:03 PM by canadave »


Offline Boy Hits Car

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2007, 04:03:51 PM »
Thanks for the replies everyone.  Can't wait to go.  I've changed my list to the following and hope to post some pics.  I'd love to try that place in Ridgewood, NJ, but it is out of the way. 

First Choices:
DiFara's Brooklyn
Totonno's Brooklyn
Luzzo's Manhattan
Una Pizza Neapolatana Manhattan
Sezz Medi

Alternates:
Grimaldi's Brooklyn
Patsy's Manhattan
Naples 45 Manhattan

As a side note:  Has anyone tried a place called Da Ciro?  I heard the chef makes brick oven pizza and that their focaccia robiola is to die for.

A little snippet from a new york magazine:

At this regional-Italian restaurant decorated with antique photos of the old country and terra cotta pottery on exposed-brick walls, Naples native Ciro Verde  produces a very fine thin-crust pizza that bears the smoky flavor only a wood-burning oven can impart. Interestingly, while the tomato sauce is fresh, properly acidic, and not oversweet, the sauceless pies steal the show. Pizza Bianco Con Prosciutto weds fontina and mozzarella to their textural opposites, prosciutto and peppery arugula; the result is a well-blended sharpness. Fragrant with truffle oil, focaccia robiola da Ciro, with a creamy center of Robiola cheese flanked by focaccia, is the signature dish.


http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/da-ciro/index.html

Offline scott r

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2007, 05:20:34 PM »
saw it on that boby flay food network special.  Looks good!

Offline David

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2007, 10:50:48 PM »


As a side note:  Has anyone tried a place called Da Ciro?  I heard the chef makes brick oven pizza and that their focaccia robiola is to die for.

A little snippet from a new york magazine:

At this regional-Italian restaurant decorated with antique photos of the old country and terra cotta pottery on exposed-brick walls, Naples native Ciro Verde  produces a very fine thin-crust pizza that bears the smoky flavor only a wood-burning oven can impart. Interestingly, while the tomato sauce is fresh, properly acidic, and not oversweet, the sauceless pies steal the show. Pizza Bianco Con Prosciutto weds fontina and mozzarella to their textural opposites, prosciutto and peppery arugula; the result is a well-blended sharpness. Fragrant with truffle oil, focaccia robiola da Ciro, with a creamy center of Robiola cheese flanked by focaccia, is the signature dish.


http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/da-ciro/index.html

Ciro's Old but Interesting Review
« on: February 22, 2006, 06:11:07 PM »

You should read my old post and the additional link regarding Ciro's.
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Offline Boy Hits Car

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2007, 10:51:48 AM »
What a great time I had yesterday. 

We started off at DiFara's in Brooklyn and it was a bitter sweet experience.  We arrived about 20 minutes before opening (12pm) and were about the fifth or sixth group in line.  The doors open and it was a mad scramble to the counter and seating area.  Within seconds every table was claimed and every inch of counter space was taken.  I was only nanometers from the counter, but in no position to be noticed by Dom or his son.  Orders, requests, questions started flying towards Dom and it appears most of the people ahead of me called their orders in advance.  To their surprise, their orders weren't complete!  So each one had to explain and repeat several times what they ordered.  Dom, totally calm and  with little concern for the customers seemingly annoyed demeanor started to make each order by himself, slowly.  There was one pizza ready at the counter for slices, but it was quickly dolled out before I had a chance to get a hand on two slices.  Slowly and painfully the orders for full round and square pizzas were being filled; in the meantime I was asked three times what I wanted.  I answered each time with "2 slices please" and was dismissed with an "OK" and no slices :'(

Panic started to set in as people behind me were getting their orders filled.  Locals would come in, take a peek over the counter to see if there were slices available and would as soon turn around and leave.  Some of the customers were barking out orders at Dom.  As Dom would place a pizza in the oven, you could hear: "Dom, that 'spose to have mushrooms on it!" and Dom, without batting an eye or looking up, would throw some mushrooms on the pie.  Others would periodically summarize for Dom what he should be building next:  "Two squares, one with sausage, and a round pie, half mushrooms..."  Customers behind me would belt out to Dom's son when he appeared from the back:  "Two Sicilian slices, both corner pieces..."  I was getting antsy, nervous, and was entering a state of despair; very typical of me when I'm two hours into a trip to New York City.

I am usually a very laid back kind of person not very assertive or demanding, however, when I enter New York, some kind of animal instinct of survival takes over me.  DiFara's made it even worse. I started to scheme and plot to get myself two frickin' slices of pizza.  I looked for any opportunity; my five senses went into overdrive.  I was looking to exploit any situation or person that could lead to pizza.

After 45 minutes of waiting at the counter I was getting disparate. There was only about three pizzas in the oven and I knew all three where claimed, but an opportunity arouse.  A group of people ordered two pizzas, one plain round and one plain square.  The round came out first and they all went to the back of the restaurant to eat it.  They were focused and distracted by it.  Five minutes later their square pizza came out and Dom announced it.  The group didn't hear him and no one claimed it.  I knew it belonged to the group in the back eating their round pizza...the "normal everyday me" contemplated for about 3 seconds to get their attention... but the "New York me" turned and said:  "Dom, you said this one was for slices"  >:D.  I held my breath...it worked, he fell for it!  Dom didn't even look at me, said "OK" and turned around and started working on another pizza.

Exuberance and joy shot up my spine...it was now only a matter of minutes before I would be receiving pizza.  Another five minutes passed and Dom's son comes up from the back and before he could even assess the situation, customers from behind me started shouting out requests for Sicilians slices.  He acknowledges them and starts cutting up the pie.  Luckily, since I was firmly positioned in front of the pie, I whispered to him, in a most eloquent and poetic way possible: "First me, k?"  What a proud moment it was for me when he looked up and said:  "Is square OK?"  Me:  "Square would be perfect!"  Finally!  One of the longest, most frustrating hours of my life had ended with two frickin slices of pizza.

Before I discuss all the other pizzas we tried yesterday, I'd like to proclaim these two frickin slices of Sicilian pizza as hands down the best we had all day.  I've never liked Sicilian pizza, but this was nothing like I've ever had before.  Dripping with sauce and cheese, a crust so perfect...I can't even explain it.  The long frustrating wait; the annoying customers; the complete lack of order; the inexplicable lack of napkins; and the fact that I had to wipe my saucy, greasy hands on my jeans was completely dismissed and overshadowed by these amazing pieces of pizza.

I was off to Totanno's on Coney Island with a smile...

PS.  I didn't take any pictures at DiFara's since we were already 1.5 hours behind schedule.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2007, 10:58:58 AM by Boy Hits Car »

Offline Boy Hits Car

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2007, 11:53:24 AM »
We arrived at Totanno's and luckily found an empty table, the only one available at the time.  Our waitress appeared a few minutes after we sat down and was polite, but quirt (no nonsense):  "What kind of pie you want?" and "Drinks?"  We ordered some water and one plain cheese.

The pizza arrived about 15 minutes later.  Excellent first couple of slices; perfect amount of sauce and cheese, very stellar pizza.  We then got to the side that was slightly burnt.  Still edible and surprisingly still pretty tasty, although it was obviously left in a little too long.  The crust was very thin and you could easily eat a whole pie by yourself.  A fact proven by two people sitting across from us that downed two large pizzas in 10 minutes.

They do not sell by the slice, which a large sign on the door indicated, however this did not stop us from observing one customer coming in and pleading for some slices only to be told that: "We haven't sold slices for 80 years and we ain't going to start now."  What was puzzling is that seconds after the customer asked for slices his family of six arrived and  ordered 3 large pizzas.   ???  The waitress turned  back to the kitchen and did the old "hand gun to the temple and pull the trigger" motion signifying that she had had it with customers for the day.

I proceeded to use the bathroom and had to take a path behind the oven and into the prep room for access.  The area was very clean and organized.  Overall, a very good pizza and a very good experience.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2007, 11:56:27 AM by Boy Hits Car »

Offline Boy Hits Car

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2007, 12:42:43 PM »
We returned to Manhattan after a brief visit to the Coney Island boardwalk.  We walked around Manhattan and stoped in some stores and tried to take a breather.  Sezz Medi was next on the list but it was approaching 4:30pm and we wanted to be in line early for Una Pizza Napolatana.  Consequently, this is where we headed.

We arrived about 20 minutes prior to opening(5pm) and were the first in line.  A line slowly started to form behind us and everyone in line seemed excited to get their first taste of UPN pizza or as one of the reviews posted on the window said:  "One of the top 10 pizzas in the country!"  The metal doors that lead to UPN's basement were open and I took a quick picture of the area where they prep the wood for the oven.  I was also able to take a picture of the oven warming up as you will see below.

While waiting outside, a very "colorful" old lady walked past us and I witness an exchange I will never forget.  A married couple with two children were standing behind us.  One of the kids dropped a toy onto the middle of the side walk and promptly bent down to pick it up.   At the same exact moment a little old lady, easily in her 80s, screams at the little boy:  "Get out of the way you little brat."  The father said something like: "Whoa, relax!"  And the old lady, as unnecessarily as before, responds:  "Teach your brats some manners!" and walks away.  The mother and father look at each other and just crack up and we did the same.  She obviously was having a bad day.  We exchanged a few clever remarks at each other poking fun of the old lady.

At 5pm on the dot, the door opened and had free rein of the dining area. I found a table with a great view of the oven so as to watch Anthony create his pizzas.  The dining area was filled within in minutes of opening.  The wait staff had taken everyone's order pretty quickly.  Anthony, who seemed like a very nice and personable person, was in no hurry or mood to start making them.  He recognized some of the customers and started mingling with them.  It soon dawned on us that we might be there longer than we had anticipated and quickly ordered some beer.

UPN offers three Italian beers to choose from.  A nice touch.  I got the light ale called Posani(I think that is what it was called).  It tasted like Bud light and I was a little disappointed.  My friend got the darker La Rosta beer.  He said it tasted like a Yuengling lager mixed with a Porter and said it was a very excellent beer. 

About 20 minutes after we ordered, we heard Anthony finally say to the couple he was chatting with:  "Well, I better get to work!"  He went straight to the oven and threw in some chunks of wood and sawdust and started to make the pizzas.  Takes him about 30 seconds to shape and top the pizza...little dabble of sauce, some pieces of buffalo mozz, a few pieces of basil, pinch of sea salt, and a drizzle of olive oil (McEvoy Estate grown organic extra virgin olive oil) and into the oven it went.  We timed it at just a shade under two minutes from the time the pizzas entered the oven to the point they were finished cooking.

Again, we were rewarded with an excellent pizza.  The basil, sauce, cheese and olive oil were perfect together and very fresh tasting.  The crust was fantastic.  Light, airy, but still a little crunchy.  When biting a piece of crust without any of the toppings, a nice pleasant sour taste was obvious and was a new experience for me.  Overall, great pizza and great service.

One 12" pizza and two beers with tip came to a total of $42.  Expensive, but a glimpse into a true pizza of Naples.



« Last Edit: January 29, 2007, 12:44:19 PM by Boy Hits Car »

Offline Boy Hits Car

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2007, 02:14:52 PM »
...and so the pizza tour concluded at Luzzo's.  Again we were seated right away and ordered one plain buffalo mozz pizza.  This one came with noticeably more sauce and cheese than the pizza at UPN.  Also noticeable was the lack of fresh basil.  Would have liked to see more.  Overall I enjoyed Luzzo's more than UPN's pizza.  The extra amount sauce and cheese added more flavor to the overall pizza, although the lack of basil was disappointing.  The sauce was tangy and flavorful.  As for the crust, it lacked the extra flavor of UPN but was a little thiner, which I liked.  Again, a fantastic pizza and great service.  We were in and out of Luzzo's in 20 minutes even though it was a crowded night.


Offline tommy

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2007, 08:10:09 PM »
Excellent report, BHC.  Thanks for the great pics!

Offline DKM

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2007, 08:57:22 PM »
Wow, Thanks for the report.

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline varasano

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Re: New York Pizza Tour - Need Advice
« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2007, 09:05:09 PM »
I Loved reading this. I gave up on my DiFara Sicilian after about 45 minutes. The regular slices were the bomb though.

Jeff


 

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