Author Topic: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?  (Read 2328 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3582
  • Location: Oakland, CA
SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« on: October 26, 2015, 03:25:54 PM »
A "local color" type story played a couple of times on the news last week featuring a bakery in the North Beach section of San Francisco - "Liguria Bakery".  The bakery has been there for many, many years and they only have one product, focaccia, which they sell in 8 x 10 sheets for about $5 each.  Different topping flavors.  They are open until they sell out the daily inventory and then they close no matter what time.

During the story, a woman that is part of the family and that works there said the oven is at 700-900 degrees.  I also surfed around and saw a couple of references to 800 degrees.  The oven is the original oven, converted to gas.

I have never seen a focaccia recipe baked at coal oven/WFO temperatures.

Does anyone have any experience at this or any "how can this be?" explanations or pointers?

Thanks
Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4285
  • Location: SF Bay Area
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2015, 05:35:48 PM »
Here's a nice video on them...

Mike

Offline chrisf

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 37
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2015, 07:25:57 PM »
I ate there a few times in the late '70's. I remember the sauce being sweet and had a flavor I liked. It was my first experience of that sort of thing. I'm not sure how I would like it now.

Watching the video with the tomato sauce and onion focaccia brings back memories...
« Last Edit: October 28, 2015, 07:30:15 PM by chrisf »

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1009
  • Location: California
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2016, 08:54:43 PM »
Do they use sourdough? The history and menu of this place is so inspiring, I love the old concept of places that master one thing. It's beautiful, and their minimal toppings all sound excellent for adding a point of interest without detracting from the bread itself and turning it into something completely different.
Ryan

Offline mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3582
  • Location: Oakland, CA
Today's Visit to SF - Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2016, 06:10:24 PM »
We finally made it into SF during the hours when the Liguria Bakery was open.  Their hours are 8 am - 1 pm and we got there around 11:45.  They were sold out of all their offerings except for the "pizza" focaccia - which is covered with a nice tomato sauce with some green onions.

The woman at the counter explained that their stuff went faster than usual today because there was a baseball game - apparently people love to take the focaccia with them for lunch!

Excellent focaccia and well worth the trip (which included lunch in Chinatown and baos and cookies from a Chinese bakery!).  Their focaccia is very soft/floppy.  That makes me think that it is, as described in the writings about it,  baked at a very high temperature.  Lots of oil in the crumb (on my hands). 

The crumb is reasonably open but no super big open holes. 

Gotta figure out how to clone it!

It was $5.  I pulled a shot of the menu off the web so one can see the different ones they sell.

Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1009
  • Location: California
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2016, 09:44:38 PM »
Do you think they are proofing in the pan at all or just going direct to bake?
I've been making quite a bit of focaccia since I found this thread. I really like it, and it's really fast and easy. I just wish I had a Blue Star range so I could bake a whole sheet pan at once to feed a bunch of people.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 09:46:12 PM by invertedisdead »
Ryan

Offline mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3582
  • Location: Oakland, CA
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2016, 09:50:06 PM »
Do you think they are proofing in the pan at all or just going direct to bake?
I've been making quite a bit of focaccia since I found this thread. I really like it, and it's really fast and easy. I just wish I had a Blue Star range so I could bake a whole sheet pan at once to feed a bunch of people.

Just a guess - that they go right to bake without a long proof in the pan.  I watched the video and they dock the dough once it is in the pan (prevents bubbles).  I don't think that it would be useful to dock and then proof.  And, if you proof and then dock that seems counter-productive since you are knocking the dough back down.
Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1009
  • Location: California
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2016, 10:08:04 PM »
Just a guess - that they go right to bake without a long proof in the pan.  I watched the video and they dock the dough once it is in the pan (prevents bubbles).  I don't think that it would be useful to dock and then proof.  And, if you proof and then dock that seems counter-productive since you are knocking the dough back down.

I guess I was thinking the docking tool was a more efficient way to replicate the dimples traditionally done with fingertips more then for bubblers like a cracker crust. The docker seems to have larger nibs then any I could find from a search. I ask because I have seem some focaccia videos where the dough is risen, then dimpled/ topped, and allowed to rise again before baking, and others that dimple right before baking.
Ryan

Offline parallei

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1147

Gotta figure out how to clone it!


Let me know when you do clone it.  Lots of oil, for sure.....

A blast from my past.  I was brought up on that stuff and the "pizza" was always my favorite.  I'll risk sounding terribly corny here:

Many years ago, when my late wife and I were just married, we drove out to the Bay Area from Denver so she could meet my parents for the first time.  The first morning we were there, my father burst into our room at 7 a.m. and told my then new wife, "Lets go. Paul is not invited."  He drove her from San Mateo up to the City and bought a slab that they eat for breakfast at the Marina Greens.  Now a father and son can have their differences, but many where forgotten that morning.

Thanks Mitch. 

     

Offline mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3582
  • Location: Oakland, CA
Let me know when you do clone it.  Lots of oil, for sure.....

A blast from my past.  I was brought up on that stuff and the "pizza" was always my favorite.  I'll risk sounding terribly corny here:

Many years ago, when my late wife and I were just married, we drove out to the Bay Area from Denver so she could meet my parents for the first time.  The first morning we were there, my father burst into our room at 7 a.m. and told my then new wife, "Lets go. Paul is not invited."  He drove her from San Mateo up to the City and bought a slab that they eat for breakfast at the Marina Greens.  Now a father and son can have their differences, but many where forgotten that morning.

Thanks Mitch. 

   

That is a nice story and obviously a very good memory for you (even though you were left out!).  What a nice touch.  Thank you for sharing it - I will be sharing it with my wife later....

I don't know where to start to clone it. 

Everything I have read says that they heat the oven by blasting it with an 800 degree flame or some such thing.  Maybe they borrow Craig's cactus burner.

I doubt if it is 800 degrees but I do believe that it is hot.  The closest I came was I made a focaccia in my pizza party oven, probably at over 600.  I remember it was floppy (I think I could have folded the one from Liguria in half without a crack - like a Neapolitan pie but really thick).  The other thing about the bread was it seemed "doughy" but in a good way.

Ideas welcome - the only things I can come up with to start is a very hot oven and maybe a flour that is less protein than bread flour.  Lots of oil as you said and obviously a high hydration.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 09:15:28 PM by mitchjg »
Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans

Offline HBolte

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1352
  • Location: Detroit, MI
    • Photos
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2016, 09:10:54 AM »
Interesting that the pans are not dark and seasoned. Is focaccia done differently than NY pan/grandma style?
Hans

Offline foreplease

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 531
  • Age: 56
  • Location: St. Joseph, MI
Let me know when you do clone it.  Lots of oil, for sure.....

A blast from my past.  I was brought up on that stuff and the "pizza" was always my favorite.  I'll risk sounding terribly corny here:

Many years ago, when my late wife and I were just married, we drove out to the Bay Area from Denver so she could meet my parents for the first time.  The first morning we were there, my father burst into our room at 7 a.m. and told my then new wife, "Lets go. Paul is not invited."  He drove her from San Mateo up to the City and bought a slab that they eat for breakfast at the Marina Greens.  Now a father and son can have their differences, but many where forgotten that morning.

Thanks Mitch. 


I really enjoyed your story and appreciate that you posted it here.
-Tony
I find it easier to imagine a diet of nothing but ice cream than one without ice cream


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1989
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2016, 03:07:17 PM »
HBOLTE;
Non-seasoned pans (not bright and shiny) are commonly used to make focaccia since the brighter colored pans reflect heat away from the dough allowing for a longer bake without excessive color development. The pans are also responsible to a great extent for the soft bottom texture. I've always allowed the dough to proof in the pan for a short time (about 20-minutes) and then brush the top with olive oil and finger dock. My favorite presentation is black olives, rosemary, sea salt and a light application of shredded Parmesan cheese. We typically baked our focaccia at 550F. If you go to the Rheon web site <www.rheonusa.com> you might be able to see a video of the Rheon automated focaccia equipment/line which produces a continuous ribbon of focaccia which is then sliced and guillotined to size for retail sale.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1009
  • Location: California
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2016, 06:06:44 PM »
I try to eat low fat so I only use 1% oil in my focaccia which is probably a lot lower than most, but it works perfectly fine for me. I like 72% hydration. I think if I was going to try to clone theirs I would try 63-68% depending on oil amount and flour.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2016, 06:15:37 PM by invertedisdead »
Ryan

Offline mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3582
  • Location: Oakland, CA
Re: SF Liguria Bakery - Focaccia at 800 degrees?
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2016, 12:45:16 PM »
Just had a leftover piece of the focaccia from April - still awesome.
In trying to pin down who to approach this, I started thinking that it was very similar to the Cooks Illustrated Sicilian pie dough that I had made a few months ago.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=42903.msg430224#msg430224

A little spongy, a tiny bit gummy, super tasty, crisp on the bottom.  I need to make this dough again and remind myself - just for the sake of scientific research.  :-D
Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans