Author Topic: reducing moisture in sauce  (Read 6763 times)

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Offline Bryan S

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2007, 04:33:43 PM »
Bryan S,

Have you tried it with sauce though, which is what the subject of this thread is about?  Your technique seems fine for crushed tomatoes, but then so does just using a strainer, and a strainer would be a lot faster.

- red.november
Nov, My bad, missed the sauce part :-[ I don't use the strainer method on the chrushed because of too much of the puree and toms getting pushed through along with the water. As far as the speed of them draining, I drain the toms about 2 days before making the pizza. :)
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.


Offline November

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2007, 04:48:45 PM »
I don't use the strainer method on the chrushed because of too much of the puree and toms getting pushed through along with the water.


It depends on what mesh size your sieve or colander is, but that problem is easy enough to solve with a coffee filter as Castello_Pietro previously mentioned.  I really don't like to wait too long for things to drain or strain, so I usually place a coffee filter in my sieve, pour the material into the filter, and when the filter is too clogged with small particles to strain under the pressure of gravity, I pick up the filter by the edges and twist to force the rest of the liquid out.  Whoever is interested, may want to pick up a gold coffee filter for filtration of small particulate slurries.  It is very effective and usually doesn't clog like paper filters.  I use both methods at different times for straining things such as teas with really small leaf particles, and pureed cucumber when I make Tzatziki.

- red.november

EDIT: For those who are not familiar with gold filters, swissgold is probably the best brand out there, but the price of a gold filter may be beyond what some will want to spend for straining teas and purees.

Close-up Image:
http://www.fantes.com/images/17122filters.jpg
Manufacturer's Product Page:
http://www.swissgold.com/e/c_produkt02.asp
« Last Edit: March 17, 2007, 05:09:31 PM by November »

Offline Castello_Pietro

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2007, 02:03:15 PM »
I'll offer a few "rapid fire" solutions.  Additional Straining Options
10) Cheese cloth

- red.november

As I said, a drip coffee filter will reduce moisture and the liquid comes out clear, low cost, use diced tomatoes...unless your a klutz, it is relatively easy for home use, of course not practical in the shop. ;D

The purpose being to have the sauce and the cheese become one without excess moisture.  You end up with wonderful pie that looks like the pizza.com avatar. :chef:
It just doesn't get any better than Pizza in Positano.

Offline BTB

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2007, 08:29:09 AM »
Bryan S, no matter, since I don't use all the sauce in the 28 oz can of 6 in 1 at one time for my 9 inch pie, I put the remainder of the sauce from the can in a sealed plastic container in the refrigerator for a week or two.  I just received the 6 and 1 and my wife and I love it, BUT it made the pizza very watery.  I think I'll try your idea as it looks pretty good.  Will let you know how it turns out.  I know it's just one idea and there may be other ways.

Offline joe123

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2007, 04:57:42 PM »
Ever since I read Bryan S's idea about draining the can I have been using that technique with great results.  I usually get about a quarter cup of water out of a 28 oz can of 6-in-1 left draining for 24 hours in the fridge.  The resulting consistency is perfect for pizza sauce and I never get a watery pie.  Thanks Bryan S. for the great tip!

Offline bakerboy

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2007, 04:19:01 PM »
We use a combination of 7/11 and saporito which gives us a VERY thick sauce.  We then bring our sauce to the consistency we want with the juice from our whole peeled tomatos.  The whole peeled we use for another application.
It could be simply described as a one-way airflow.  Take a lid to a container you don't mind modifying (destroying) and cut out a hole to mount a small electric fan.  Fans used in computer cases, that don't require a servo controller, work well for this kind of setup.  What is important is that the fan can be sealed air-tight against the lid with silicone adhesive.  The fan is then powered by an insulated battery pack and allowed to constantly blow air from the inside to the outside while in the refrigerator.  Since the air flow is expected to be one-way, there's no chance of the sauce picking up flavors from the rest of the refrigerator.  This accomplished three things, micro-convection within the container, a partial vacuum to increase the evaporation rate, and a place for the moist air to go other than back in the sauce.

- red.november
Dude, seriously, just cool your sauce, pop it in a clean container, lid it up and toss it in the fridge.  Its easy, safe, and works EVERY time. 

Offline jkandell

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2007, 07:28:34 PM »
1) Miniature desiccant air dryers in a double-container setup
2) Chemical desiccant (e.g. DampRid, sugar, salt) in a double-container setup
3) Miniature (Peltier thermoelectric) dehumidifier in a double-container setup
4) Vacuum distillation
5) Negative pressure system (makeshift only)
6) Kerosene lamp wick, long, coiled, and elevated above the sauce in the container
7) Paper towel placed in or on top of the sauce - could also use a reusable hand towel
8) Coffee filter placed on top of the sauce and filled 0.5 cm deep with salt or sugar - could also use rice or pasta so that the flavor doesn't go to waste, or reheat the used salt to dry it back out and use in the sauce itself
9) Place paper bag in container first, then fill paper bag with sauce - use several paper bag linings if necessary

continuing november's list:
10) kerosene heats string, string goes into sauce, water absorbs into string
11) tampon (don't reuse)
12) atom smasher, with sauce placed at key places in the facility
13) old generator from nuclear submarine or north korea hooked to reusable hand towel
14) quartzite crystal placed under pyramid with sauce at 'vortex' where energy focuses.
15) pray
16) Peltier thermoelectric desiccant in double boiler with manifestation of ergo-efficiency, run through twice
17) clothes dryer.

Just kidding November, couldn't resist. :-)

Offline Gregor111

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2007, 05:59:57 PM »
In general terms, is it preferable to try to drain excess water from the can and prevent excess moisture in the first place or is it better to allow the sauce to simmer on the stove until reduced? 

Greg
« Last Edit: October 09, 2007, 10:53:27 PM by Gregor111 »

Offline csacks

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2007, 05:19:02 AM »
Greg, it's all about the flavor that you are going for.  I am not necessarily going for a fresh tomato flavor.  Many are looking for canned tomatoes that retain a fresh-bright flavor and don't want that taste changed by simmering the sauce.  I think that simmering can enhance the flavor.

My best example is that I was making some salsa with fresh tomatoes from the garden.  I found that the taste that I preferred was when I took half the salsa and simmered it in a sauce pan.  Then I put the simmered and raw salsa back together.  Simmering reduced the watery juice and concentrated the flavor. 

Offline csacks

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2007, 11:43:05 AM »
http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?t=4334

I found this today on the PMQ think tank. 


Offline Gregor111

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2007, 03:51:11 PM »
Greg, it's all about the flavor that you are going for.  I am not necessarily going for a fresh tomato flavor.  Many are looking for canned tomatoes that retain a fresh-bright flavor and don't want that taste changed by simmering the sauce.  I think that simmering can enhance the flavor.

My best example is that I was making some salsa with fresh tomatoes from the garden.  I found that the taste that I preferred was when I took half the salsa and simmered it in a sauce pan.  Then I put the simmered and raw salsa back together.  Simmering reduced the watery juice and concentrated the flavor. 

Naturally that makes sense.

A couple nights ago I took a can of Cento San Marzano and a can of Gia Russa and cooked them side by side.  It took an hour to cook down but I do prefer the cooked down flavor.  I get the impression a fair number of people really like the Cento's.  To me they were very earthy and pungent tasting.  Then again, it could have been a bad can, or maybe that is how they were supposed to taste. The Gia Russa's while more acidic and bitter out of the can, cooked down into a much better sauce.  I just received two cases of La Bella's and I'll see how they compare this weekend.

Greg

Offline dms

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Re: reducing moisture in sauce
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2007, 11:39:23 PM »
You might try straining the tomatoes, collecting the liquid drained, and cooking that down.  Chill it, and then add it back to solids. 

Different parts of the tomato have different make up.  The solid parts have more sugar in them than the jelly surrounding the seeds or the juice does.  The jelly and juice are much higher in citric and malic acids than than the fruit walls are.  The acids aren't much effected by the cooking, so the real change is water loss. 


 

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