Author Topic: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe  (Read 6158 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« on: March 05, 2007, 10:41:45 AM »
Recently, at the PMQ Think Tank, at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=8933#8933, Tom Lehmann posted a new “thin” NY dough formulation that was used for demonstration purposes at the most recent (2/07) NAPICS (North American Pizza and Ice Cream Show) in Columbus, Ohio. My speculation has always been that doughs made for shows like NAPICS are “designed” to handle almost flawlessly, even by people who are not experienced in working with pizza dough. Consequently, they should be good general-purpose recipes. The latest NAPICS formulation is for a very thin NY style—considerably thinner than what is produced using the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation. Using the baker’s percents and thickness factor (0.079646) posted by Tom, I was able to come up with the ingredient quantities for making a 14” pizza, as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (57%):
IDY (0.375%):
Salt (1.75%):
Oil (3%):
Total (162.125%):
219.75 g  |  7.75 oz | 0.48 lbs
125.26 g  |  4.42 oz | 0.28 lbs
0.82 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.27 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
3.85 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.69 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
6.59 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.47 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
356.28 g | 12.57 oz | 0.79 lbs | TF = 0.0816372

As noted in the referenced PMQTT post, the flour specified is the Superlative flour. This is a bread flour sold by General Mills to professionals. For purposes of trying the new dough formulation, I substituted the King Arthur brand of bread flour. The water in the above formulation is specified to be room temperature water (about 65 degrees F). To compensate for minor dough losses, I increased the quantities of ingredients by 2.5%, resulting in a “final” thickness factor of 0.0816372, as noted in the above formulation. The finished dough weight was 12.50 ounces, or slightly more than the amount (12.25 ounces) that corresponds to the starting thickness factor of 0.079646.

To prepare the dough itself, I used the new KitchenAid dough making method as generally described at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg33251.html#msg33251. More specifically, I first sifted the flour and dispersed the IDY in the flour. I then added the formula water and the salt to the bowl of my KitchenAid mixer and stirred until the salt was completely dissolved. With the whisk attached and using the stir speed, I then gradually added the flour/IDY mixture to the “brine” in the bowl. After the whisk started to fill up with the batter-like dough, I removed the dough from the whisk and substituted the flat beater. The remaining flour was gradually added, along with the oil, and the ingredients were combined, also at stir speed, until the bulk of the dough gathered around the flat beater. Because of the relatively low hydration specified in the formulation--57%--the dough was fairly dense. Hence, it became necessary to switch to the C-hook a few minutes earlier than if a considerably higher hydration had been used. Also, I found it necessary to use the 2 speed to do most of the final kneading with the C-hook. Once the dough was done, I shaped the dough into a round ball, lightly oiled it, and placed it in a lidded plastic container (Rubbermaid), which was then placed in the refrigerator.

As an alternative to the above dough making method, it is also possible to use the method that I previously used, and described starting at about the middle of Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2223.msg19563.html#msg19563.

Originally, my intention was to use the dough after 48 hours, as suggested by Tom in the referenced PMQTT post, but a scheduling conflict necessitated that I use the dough after 72 hours. Once the dough was taken out of the refrigerator, it was allowed to warm up at room temperature for about 2 hours. The dough was easy to handle and to shape and stretch out to 14”. The skin was dressed (in basic pepperoni style) and baked on a pizza stone (on the lowest oven rack position) that had been preheated for about an hour at around 500-550 degrees F. The pizza baked on the stone for about 6 minutes, whereupon it was removed to the top oven rack position for a final minute of baking.

The photos below show the finished pizza. The pizza was very good, with a chewy, lightweight crust and a crispy bottom, and with good crust color and flavor. There was decent oven spring but because of the small amount of dough involved for a 14” pizza, around 12.25 ounces, the rim was modest in size, but still very much in line with the NY style pizzas I have seen throughout New York City during my visits there.

In future efforts, I would be inclined to increase the hydration to around 60%, to be more in line with the absorption rate of bread flour. Another possibility is to use a high-gluten flour, such as the KASL, and a hydration of at least 63%. In either case, I would perhaps use cold water and add the yeast and salt at the end of the dough processing, rather than at the start, in order to extend the useful life of the dough beyond 2-3 days and achieve better final crust flavors and texture. For those members who wish to do their own experimenting with the new dough formulation, they should feel free to use the Lehmann dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html. I suggest using a thickness factor of 0.0796 if there is no need to compensate for bowl losses, and 0.0816 if a 2.5% adjustment is desired. The baker’s percents should be those as noted in the above formulation, as modified as desired to accommodate different flours and hydration percents. But even without these changes, the dough formulation should produce a good 2-3 day dough—good enough to be used by professionals and home pizza makers alike.

Peter


Offline Randy

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2007, 05:50:38 PM »
Beautiful!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2007, 06:28:16 PM »
Thanks, Randy.

I would think that the Harvest King flour should also work. I checked the specs for the Superlative flour (http://www.gmflour.com/gmflour/Flour_SpecSheet/Superlative53521(West).doc) and the Harvest King flour (http://www.gmflour.com/gmflour/Flour_SpecSheet/HarvestKing53722.doc) and the Superlative flour seems to have attributes of both the KA bread flour that I used and the Harvest King flour, with a protein content (12.6% +/- 0.3%) closer to the KA bread flour but with an ash content closer to the Harvest King flour. The Superlative flour also includes ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) as a dough conditioner. Neither the Harvest King or King Arthur bread flour includes ascorbic acid.

It occurs to me that using November's Mixed Mass Percentage calculating tool at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/, it may be possible to combine some vital wheat gluten with the Harvest King flour to increase the protein content to 12.6% (the protein content of the Superlative flour) and add a pinch of ascorbic acid powder. To get the falling numbers a bit closer (the Superlative flour has more amylase activity than the Harvest King flour), a bit of diastatic barley malt could also be added to the Harvest King flour. I think this would make for an interesting experiment.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 10:00:31 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2008, 01:36:01 PM »
In my last post, I wondered whether it would be possible to morph the Harvest King flour into the Superlative flour by adding vital wheat gluten and a bit of diastatic malt and ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) to the Harvest King flour. The purpose of doing this would be to avoid having to find a source of the Superlative flour, which is not normally sold to individuals. On the other hand, the Harvest King flour is sold in nearly all supermarkets. So, I decided to conduct an experiment to determine the efficacy of the Harvest King flour, as modified along the above lines, in the NAPICS 2007 recipe referenced earlier in this thread. While I was at it, I decided to increase the hydration percent to around 62%, which is a value that is close to the absorption rate of the Harvest King flour.

I started by using November’s Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to determine how much vital wheat gluten (VWG) I would have to add to the Harvest King flour to achieve a final protein content equal to 12.6%, which is the protein content of the Superlative flour. Once I ascertained that, and did some additional calculations to be able to use the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, I came up with the following dough formulation:

Flour (100%):
Water (62.6889%):
IDY (0.37729%):
Salt (1.76858%):
Olive Oil (3.03253%):
Vital Wheat Gluten (1.11113%):
Diastatic Malt Powder (0.50%):
Total (169.47843%):
212.03 g  |  7.48 oz | 0.47 lbs
132.92 g  |  4.69 oz | 0.29 lbs
0.8 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.27 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
3.75 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.67 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
6.43 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.43 tsp | 0.48 tbsp
2.36 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.69 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
1.06 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.45 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
359.35 g | 12.68 oz | 0.79 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: A pinch of Vitamin C powder was added to the above formulation. No bowl residue compensation was used.

As noted in the above table, 212.03 grams of the Harvest King flour and 2.36 grams of the VWG were used. The VWG was the Hodgson Mills brand. The diastatic malt was the Bob’s Red Mill brand. The ascorbic acid was in the form of a Vitamin C powder. The amount of Vitamin C was equal to about 1/64 teaspoon. The various percents were modified to allow one to use the expanded dough calculating tool in the future to make pizzas of any desired size. For that purpose, I calculated a nominal thickness factor of 0.0823701. That is the value that one would enter into the tool, along with the above set of baker’s percents, when using the Thickness Factor option. For my experiment, the pizza size that corresponds to the amount of dough indicated in the above table, 12.68 ounces, is 14”. I should point out that in using the tool, it will be necessary to convert the weight of diastatic malt to volume using the conversion factor of one teaspoon diastatic malt equals 0.0881834 oz., which I discovered recently is off by one decimal place in the tool. This error will be corrected in the next iteration of the tool.

To prepare the dough, I added all of the dry ingredients together and added the mixture gradually to the mixer bowl of my standard KitchenAid mixer, into which I had first added the salt and water (at 65 degrees F) and stirred to dissolve, about a minute. The ingredients were mixed, using the C-hook and the stir speed, until the ingredients came together into a rough dough ball. The olive oil was then added and the dough was then kneaded at speed 2 for about 5 minutes. Because the dough was slightly on the sticky side, I found it necessary to add about two additional teaspoons of Harvest King flour. This had the effect of lowering the hydration to around 60%. The finished dough weight was 12.73 ounces, and the finished dough temperature was 70.6 degrees F. After lightly brushing the dough ball with olive oil, it was placed into a Rubbermaid plastic storage container (covered) and placed in the refrigerator for almost two days.

Upon removing the dough ball from the refrigerator, I allowed it to warm up at room temperature (about 68 degrees F) for a bit over 2 hours. It was then shaped and stretched into a 14” skin. The dough was quite extensible with a lot of little bubbles but I had no problem stretching it out to 14” without thin spots or tears forming. The pizza was dressed in basic pepperoni style and baked for about 7 minutes on my pizza stone that had been positioned on the lowest oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at around 500-550 degrees F. I then moved the pizza to the topmost oven rack position for about a minute.

The photos below show the finished pizza. The pizza turned out very well. There was good oven spring, with a good sized rim, and the color and texture were very good. The crust was chewy and the crumb was soft. I would say that the pizza was equal to the last NAPICS 2007 version using the King Arthur bread flour. I see no reason why both flours can’t be used with the NAPICS 2007 recipe. The main purpose of the experiment was to see if the Harvest King flour was a viable option as a substitute for the Superlative flour, given the widespread availability of the Harvest King flour to home pizza makers. However, I suspect that both flours will work without having to modify them by adding vital wheat gluten, diastatic malt and ascorbic acid as I did with the Harvest King flour for the purposes of my experiment.

I hope to try the NAPICS 2008 recipe in due course.

Peter

EDIT (3/4/13): Replaced Calculator link with the current link.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 07:46:39 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline addicted

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2008, 02:04:11 PM »
Looks good pete. There are two types of superlative and one is bromated. I am curious if you have ever experimated with bromated flours because it seem like most Ny pizzerias use these type of flours. The local Pizza scmizza chain uses Superlative bromated flour and there crust is thin crispy but with a bready cornicione(sp?). Does bromated flour enhance texture or crispness or does it just make the dough easier to handle?
Well....okay,then.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2008, 03:11:56 PM »
addicted,

I very rarely use bromated flours but bromated flours are very popular among pizza operators because the bromate (potassium bromate) strengthens the dough (by its effect on the gluten) and makes the dough elastic and easier to knead, especially with commercial mixers. The dough also holds its rise better during proofing, making bromated flours popular in making doughs that are proofed at some point, for example, Sicilian style doughs or pan pizza doughs. I recall reading about a pizza operator who complained that his Sicilian doughs didn't proof as well when he switched to a non-bromated flour. The advice given to him was to go back to the bromated flour.

Peter

Offline bolabola

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2008, 03:59:59 PM »
Tasty looking pizza Peter..
it always amazes me how good your pies turn out on such low heat..
Pizza Rocks

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New (2/07) NAPICS/Lehmann "Thin" NY Style Dough Recipe
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2008, 04:29:54 PM »
bolabola,

Actually, my stone temperature in my home oven is not much different than what professionals use with deck ovens, except that my oven is taller. That is one of the reasons why I often move my pizzas from the stone to upper rack positions where the tops of the pizzas can get more heat. So, it is basically a matter of mastering my own oven. A good part of it is also managing the dough during the fermentation stage such that there is enough residual sugar in the dough to contribute to crust coloration at the time of baking.

I recently moved my stone closer to the lower electric heating coil where I can get a stone temperature of close to 620 degrees F. I haven't yet made enough pizzas at that temperature to learn how best to take advantage of the higher temperature.

Peter


 

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