Author Topic: Low Carb Pizza Crust  (Read 29603 times)

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Kelly Joe

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Low Carb Pizza Crust
« on: August 01, 2004, 08:51:02 AM »
Well, I'm new to this message board - but I can tell by the replies that many of you have LOTS of experience making pizzas....

I went to a local pizzaria called BRUNO's and they have a low carb crust.  Of course they wouldn't tell me how it's made but after searching the internet, I found that most low carb crusts are made partly with soy flour.  

Two questions...

Does any one have experience using soy flour?  And second, I've heard it has a funky taste...

THX....


Offline Randy

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2004, 04:11:30 PM »
Not sure but I think a low carb pizza is a sin.
 :o

Randy

Offline masterbaker

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2004, 04:14:38 PM »
 I had low carb pizza once. Taste like ah.... crap. I was very hungry and I couldn't even finish 1 piece. Yuck.

Offline Pizzaholic

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2004, 06:11:34 PM »
Why bother???
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Online Steve

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2004, 06:42:42 PM »
Long ago, when I was on a low-carb diet, this is how I made a low-carb pizza:

Put four slices of provolone cheese on a plate.

Add a dollup of homemade pizza sauce (no sugar, etc.)

Cover with pepperoni slices.

Add some grated parmesean cheese.

Nuke in the microwave until the cheese has melted.

It was pretty good! And the benefit was no funny tasting ingredients!
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kellyjo

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2004, 07:08:26 PM »
 ;D  Of course low carb pizza crust is a sin... LOL...

I am a pizza junky, but if I can still enjoy pizza with less carbs for a diet - I''ll do it....  

There are thick pizza crusts...  Thick crusts have a yield of 40-50 grams of carbs per slice.  I like thin crusts, cracker like...

Thin crusts yield between 35-40 grams of carbs per slice...  

But, if I can get that down to about 5-10 grams - I can eat pizza till the cows come home....

And speaking of cows, I'm on the Atkins diet...

hehehehehehehe....

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2004, 08:57:11 PM »
Ahhhhhhh, another person driving up the costs of beef and dairy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!jk
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Offline mama mia

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2004, 09:28:32 AM »
the low carb diet is so lame... maybe if people would take the time to eat fresh fruits and veggies, and did some more physical activities... the would see that low carb is crap.   ::) :P    for those on the low carb fad, once you put a carb in your mouth.. all the fat plus some more will find its way back to your thighs..  

---> everything in moderation people  ;D  these friggin low carbers are making the cheese & meat for my pizzas shoot up sky high.. thanks!  

Online Steve

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2004, 11:12:18 AM »
I did Atkins about two years ago. I lost close to 50 pounds. Needless to say, it all came back. Then, back in January I bought a treadmill and started walking for one hour each night. I am now down 30 pounds and can wear my size 34 pants with no problem. And, I am eating regular food (including pizza) in moderation.  :D
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kellyjo

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2004, 08:20:06 AM »
U Know, you folks are absolutely right!  This low carb crap is for the birds....  I made the thin crust pizza that DKM and others had posted on this website and it was the bomb!

I had a cookout last weekend and used some low-carb BBQ sauce...  It ruined the ribs....



Offline giotto

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2004, 03:38:32 AM »
I learned the following from a friend who had gestational diabetes and had great success from her nutritionist.  Incredible success, and a great way to maintain a decent amount of carbs in your diet over a lifetime.  Despite my propensity to eat a couple of slices of NY style pizza per meal on a daily basis, I have had great success as well, and so have friends:

- After each snack/meal, take a 5 - 15 minute walk or some form of similar exercise.  All carbs turn into sugars within 2 hours in your body.  If you were to measure the effect of a simple 5 - 10 minute walk immediately after every meal/snack, you would be amazed at how much less sugar your body needs to process.  Extending your walk time to 20 or more minutes at night can make a significant difference as well.

- Don't eat for 2 hours between meals to avoid overlap of carbs & their sugar in your body.

- Stay within 30 to 35 carbs per meal.  I go to 40+ sometimes, and I walk a bit longer and eat a bit less of carbs later.

If you stick to this, you'll get results.  The tough part is making sure you don't drop the walks.  They are essential.  Even if you merely walk around a small outside area after a snack, it's worth it.  

Regarding soy flour, the main thing to remember when mixing different types of flour is you have to re-establish protein levels in wheat based breads.  Most of us seek higher gluten levels, since it is gluten that gives yeast bread its structure, and enables it to rise stronger.

All Purpose is maybe 10% - 12%; King Arthur for example is 11.7%.  Bread flour is normally 12% - 13% (e.g, King Arthur & Specialty Gold Medal Bread flour is 12.7% according to manufacturer specifications), and high gluten extends beyond this level, normally in the 14% or higher range.  Unfortunately, as you can see in other sessions, when you try to calculate the protein levels yourself, you are working with numbers that have been rounded off in the labels.  

Soy flour has a high % of protein, but it is gluten free, so you have to dismiss its protein level.  Bob's Red Mill Soy flour suggests that you replace no more than 30% of your flour with soy; otherwise, the dough will crumble instead of rise due to lack of gluten.  I certainly wouldn't try this trick with anything less than bread flour.  

Try the walks, avoid snacking for 2 hours between meals, and stay within 30 or so carbs per meal.  This still gives you breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, snack.  Not bad for a diet.  And it will likely produce better results than straying from good foods over a lifetime.

Good luck.
 ::)
« Last Edit: August 13, 2004, 09:17:47 PM by giotto »

Offline The Pontificator

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Re:Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2008, 05:04:50 PM »
I learned the following from a friend who had gestational diabetes and had great success from her nutritionist.  Incredible success, and a great way to maintain a decent amount of carbs in your diet over a lifetime.  Despite my propensity to eat a couple of slices of NY style pizza per meal on a daily basis, I have had great success as well, and so have friends:

- After each snack/meal, take a 5 - 15 minute walk or some form of similar exercise.  All carbs turn into sugars within 2 hours in your body.  If you were to measure the effect of a simple 5 - 10 minute walk immediately after every meal/snack, you would be amazed at how much less sugar your body needs to process.  Extending your walk time to 20 or more minutes at night can make a significant difference as well.

- Don't eat for 2 hours between meals to avoid overlap of carbs & their sugar in your body.

- Stay within 30 to 35 carbs per meal.  I go to 40+ sometimes, and I walk a bit longer and eat a bit less of carbs later.

If you stick to this, you'll get results.  The tough part is making sure you don't drop the walks.  They are essential.  Even if you merely walk around a small outside area after a snack, it's worth it.  

Regarding soy flour, the main thing to remember when mixing different types of flour is you have to re-establish protein levels in wheat based breads.  Most of us seek higher gluten levels, since it is gluten that gives yeast bread its structure, and enables it to rise stronger.

All Purpose is maybe 10% - 12%; King Arthur for example is 11.7%.  Bread flour is normally 12% - 13% (e.g, King Arthur & Specialty Gold Medal Bread flour is 12.7% according to manufacturer specifications), and high gluten extends beyond this level, normally in the 14% or higher range.  Unfortunately, as you can see in other sessions, when you try to calculate the protein levels yourself, you are working with numbers that have been rounded off in the labels.  

Soy flour has a high % of protein, but it is gluten free, so you have to dismiss its protein level.  Bob's Red Mill Soy flour suggests that you replace no more than 30% of your flour with soy; otherwise, the dough will crumble instead of rise due to lack of gluten.  I certainly wouldn't try this trick with anything less than bread flour.  

Try the walks, avoid snacking for 2 hours between meals, and stay within 30 or so carbs per meal.  This still gives you breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, snack.  Not bad for a diet.  And it will likely produce better results than straying from good foods over a lifetime.

Good luck.
 ::)

Perhaps this is why so many Italians are much thinner than their American counterparts. After dinner, they engage in a custom known as "passegiata" (sp?) or an after dinner stroll/walk.

"I hope you choke on a biscotti!"

Offline The Pontificator

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Re: Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2008, 05:12:31 PM »
I have T2 diabetes and while I don't practice the "Atkins" diet I do have to watch my intake of simple carbs and junk food in general.

I've tried the low-carb pizza crust mixes and to be frank, they're not very good.

My suggestion? Up your level of physical activity and make smaller pizzas.

"I hope you choke on a biscotti!"

Offline Grog

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Re: Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2008, 01:05:32 AM »
So does anyone have a recipe for low-carb pizza?

Offline goosen1

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Re: Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2008, 04:28:36 AM »
Yet to date, I have not seen a low carb pizza dough that did not involve eating a piece of cardboard with some toppings on it. On the other hand, Villa Roma had posted a Whole Wheat dough which is one of the most healthiest doughs that I have read in this forum. The link is here...  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5682.0.html  Give it a while and one of the guys here might be able to come up with something. There are a bunch of talented people in here with their heads going into overdrive. When an idea pops into their head, their on a mission to figure it out.

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Offline wildfire

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Re: Low Carb Pizza Crust
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2008, 01:26:28 PM »
If you want low-carb, just make a thin crust, whole-grain pizza.  I have never had an actual "low carb" recipe that actually tastes like pizza.