Author Topic: What does it mean to rise multiple times?  (Read 2244 times)

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Offline corduroy9

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What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« on: April 14, 2007, 08:18:02 PM »
I just received a pizza dough recipe from a friend of a friend that I've been looking for a while (comes from a former cook of a pizzeria that burned down several years ago).  It says..."then let it [the dough] rise 3 times, and call Todd to sniff the gas".  So 2 questions here...

1.  How do you let dough rise more than 1 time?  Do you refrigerate and then let it get room temp again?  Or do you knead it between risings? 

2.  Any clue what it means for Todd to sniff the gas?  I'm sure that's an inside joke, but someone out there may have an idea.  Maybe it's sealed when it rises and you open it to smell the gas inside? So unsealing it may be how you let it rise several times?  Any inkling here?

If I can decipher some of the other instructions too, I'll post the recipe.

Thanks!


Online Pete-zza

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Re: What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2007, 09:35:58 PM »
corduroy9,

I'd be interested in seeing the rest of the recipe, but if a dough is intended to rise three times that usually means a dough that uses a lot of yeast and is allowed to rise at room temperature, with punchdowns in between. If the container holding the dough is tightly covered, the smell upon opening the container could be an alcohol smell or some other byproduct of fermentation. It might even be a yeasty smell if a lot of yeast was used.

Peter

Offline corduroy9

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Re: What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2007, 07:40:42 AM »

Here it is.  Not much yeast, it doesn't seem, for 50 lbs of flour.  It's not very precise in some spots.  This is what I call Pub Pizza.  Sort of what Ledo's pizza makes.  It's thin and crispy, a crackery crust.  I've tried several variations of the thin crust recipes from this site/forum but it isn't very close to what I remember.  It looks like the amount of butter is the big difference.

Also, if anyone can help me divide all measurements by 50 (to make it start with 1 pound of flour, for a single pizza batch size), that'd be great.  I haven't tried this recipe yet.  Thanks!

-- 50 lb bag unbleached flour
-- 10lbs butter
-- that small cup  of sugar, i think its 8 oz
-- 1/2 small cup of salt   4oz?
-- full small cup of veg oil.
-- take 4oz of dry yeast and dissolve it that pot with room temp water,
--  what do you think the volume was of that big pot we made shrimp in? If you remember you had to fill the water to that ring etched on the side of pot which was about a finger tip length from the top rim
-- mix all together and gradually add 1/2 gals of water till right consistency.
-- I think you filled the big pot up twice but not sure so that's why im thinkin to start with 1/2 gallon and add.
-- You can always add more flour if its too wet.
-- then let it rise 3 times, and call Todd to sniff the gas.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2007, 12:25:12 PM »
corduroy9,

Now that I see the additional recipe information, I would say that the expression "let it rise three times" was referring to a tripling of the volume of the dough, not three separate rises with punchdowns in between. You are correct that the recipe does not use much yeast, but to get a tripling of the dough volume I believe you would have to use a room temperature fermentation. I don't think you can get a tripling in dough volume in a refrigerator or cooler with the amount of yeast called for in the recipe, which I calculated to be a bit less than 0.40% (ADY) of the flour weight.

As far as scaling the recipe down to use one pound of flour, a key missing piece of information is the actual formula water used. The amount of water is especially critical for a dough intended to make a cracker-type crust and being off just a little can lead to unsatisfactory results. Nonetheless, I took a stab at downsizing your recipe but left the water part blank. If you decide to try the scaled down recipe, you will perhaps want to add water to the mix gradually until you achieve the "right consistency" that you referred to in your notes. In scaling the recipe down to use one pound of flour, I assumed that all measurements except for the flour and butter are stated in volumes. You didn't indicate whether the butter is salted or not, but if it is salted, the amount of total salt will be higher than what I have shown below. You should also be sure that you use the proper flour because the amount of water you will need will have to be consistent with the flour used.

Assuming I did the math and conversions correctly, this is what I get:

100%, Flour, 1 lb. = 16 oz.
20%, Butter, 0.2 lb. = 3.2 oz. = approx. 6 T. + 1 t.
0.84%, Sugar, 0.135 oz. = approx. 1 t.
0.59%, Salt, 0.095 oz. = approx. 1 t.
0.96%, Oil (soybean), 0.15 oz. = approx. 1 t.
0.40%, Yeast (ADY), 0.06 oz. = approx. 1/2 t.
   ?    , Water

If you proceed, please let us know what the results are, or any problems you experienced. If possible, please also note how much water you used, whether by volume or by weight.

Peter

Offline corduroy9

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Re: What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2007, 01:17:23 PM »
Thanks for all the help!  I will try this soon, probably this weekend, and let you know.

Offline corduroy9

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Re: What does it mean to rise multiple times?
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2007, 12:39:06 PM »

I finally got around to making the dough last weekend.  Here are my results/recipe...

1 lb King Arthur Unbleached All Purpose flour
6T + 1t of butter (almost a whole stick)
1t sugar
1t salt
1t EVOO
3/4t yeast
3/4 cup water, hot

Used 1/4 cup water to dissolve yeast, let sit 10 mins
Other 1/2 cup of water used to melt butter in microwave, cooked 20 seconds at a time until melted.  Added EVOO.

Put all the dry ingredients in the mixing bowl, slowly added the wet ingredients, let it knead for 10 minutes.

Placed in a sealed bowl at room temp for 3 hours.  It doubled its size.  Punched down/kneaded for 2 minutes every 3 hours.  Did that twice. 

Placed it in the fridge in a ziplock bag for a few days.  It didn't seem to do anything there.

Rolled out 12-inch pie, par baked in a pan for 4 mins at 500 degrees.  Then baked on a stone for 5 minutes.  It came out very crunchy.

A couple days later, with the rest of the dough, I was able to make a 15-inch pie.  Par baked at 475 for 4.5 mins, then topped it and cooked in the pan for 6 mins or so.  These are the pics of the 2nd pie.

It turned out pretty well.  Similar to the Devon recipe, just a little more flavor with the butter in the crust, I guess.  I'm going to make another batch soon.


 

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