Author Topic: Input on flours,.  (Read 1651 times)

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Offline prochef_313

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Input on flours,.
« on: April 12, 2007, 10:48:54 PM »
Hey wattup everyone.  My name is Derek and I have been a chef for the past six years here in Jackson, MS.  This is my first post on this forum although I have been doin research on this site for some time now.  About 5 months.  I appreciate all the help.  I want to open a pizzeria, I LOVE PIZZA.  I just want, need, or would like some input.  I also wanted to get in the loop and get to know everyone.  I have not been wantin to spend all my money on the expensive flours out there to make pizza yet so I have been usin your local grocery store brand bread flour just to get my technique and recipe down, and now I'm ready to step up to some better flours, I think.  I just figured if I didn't know what I was doing why spend all that money on a flour I didn't know how to use.  So.  Now I think I'm ready to step up.  I think I got a good formula, and now I have ordered five differerent flours from King Arthur and I'm testing them all.  They all feel so much better then the other, but I just got them in today.  I got Italian style, bread, sir lancelot, artisan, and organic a/p.  Underlined are the ones that I am favoring so far.  Food cost wise I am not sure if I want to use flours such as Caputo 00, but I am not counting them out because I have not used them yet.  I try to stay open minded.  Anyone else usin King Arthur with any good results?  I like the Neapolitan style pizza thats why I'm under this topic if you have not figured it out.  I am also just usin a Kitchen Aid mixer.  Is there a difference between the way my Kitchen Aid mixes and kneads flour vs. the larger Hobarts.  Another words will I have to change my recipe besides making it larger?   
« Last Edit: April 12, 2007, 10:50:59 PM by prochef_313 »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Input on flours,.
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2007, 09:09:37 AM »
Anyone else using King Arthur with any good results?  I like the Neapolitan style pizza thats why I'm under this topic if you have not figured it out.  I am also just using a Kitchen Aid mixer.  Is there a difference between the way my Kitchen Aid mixes and kneads flour vs. the larger Hobarts.  Another words will I have to change my recipe besides making it larger?


Derek, 

If you do a search of the forum using the keywords "King Arthur" (without the quotes), you will find 14 pages of posts. With a few common misspellings, you will get 16 pages. That in itself is a good indication of the popularity of King Arthur's flours among the members, most notably the King Arthur all-purpose, bread and high-gluten (Sir Lancelot) flours, all of which are highly regarded because of their high quality. The King Arthur organic flours are fairly new so there has been less experience with those flours. I myself just recently purchased my first bag of the King Arthur organic all-purpose flour but haven't gotten around to trying it out yet to be able to offer you an opinion. But I suspect it will be a high quality flour like the rest of the King Arthur flours.

The King Arthur Italian flour you mentioned is a low-protein domestic "clone" of the imported Italian 00 flours, and has not received nearly the acceptance of the "real" Italian 00 flours. If you are serious about the Neapolitan style, you will save yourself a lot of time and aggravation by going directly to authentic 00 flours. There are several brands now available in the U.S. although the most common brand among the members, and possibly the best imported Italian 00 flour available, is the Caputo 00 flour. There are several Caputo 00 flours, with the most popular being the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour, followed by the Caputo Extra Blu flour, which contains less protein than the Caputo Pizzeria flour. There is also a Caputo Red flour that is a stronger 00 flour and is sometimes combined with the Pizzeria flour.

Your home KitchenAid mixer will be no match for a commercial Hobart planetary mixer, and any dough formulation that you make in a home KitchenAid mixer will quite likely require modification when adapting it to a commercial application. This is not an uncommon event inasmuch as many professional pizza operators use home KitchenAid mixers to develop new dough formulations before rolling them out in their businesses. Quite often they destroy their KitchenAid mixers in the process because they tend to treat such mixers as they do their commercial Hobarts. I might add that in Italy planetary mixers are not popular machines for pizza dough making. Fork, spiral and dual arm mixers are the preferred mixers.

As far as scaling issues are concerned, you may want to read this thread, and posts linked therein: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3463.msg29335.html#msg29335.

Good luck.

Peter