Author Topic: ZEPPOLES  (Read 8193 times)

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Offline MTNpizza

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ZEPPOLES
« on: February 04, 2007, 01:07:58 AM »
I have become interested in zeppoles from reading different threads on here recentley. I just wanted to know if anyone has a recipe and instructions on how to make them.  It would be great if someone could post a recipe that they have tried and love. :D


Offline mrbthree

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2007, 12:53:09 PM »
I would also like to cast my vote for more definitive info in Zeppoli. It is my understanding that they are a specialty of Napoli, or the San Guiseppe Zeppoli version is, at least. Most of the info I've found seem to consider it another kind of donut, without the hole. I have found recipes that call for yeast, but in a previous post by a fellow member, it was stated that they are made from a bigne dough, which is an unyeasted pastry dough. Can someone(read Marco) possibly provide us with an authentic recipe for San Guiseppe Zeppoli di Napoli?
In addition, does anyone in our fourm have experience making SFOGLIATELLA? They are another pastry of Napoli I am keen to make in an authentic manner. No frozen phyllo dough from the supermarket, thank you.
One thing I want to understand is, how does Italian flake pastry technique differ from French(croissant), and others. I have, so far, been unsuccessful in finding much in print that discusses Italian pastry techniques.
Thanks.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2007, 03:31:10 PM »
My parents used to make Zeppoli all the time. It isn't a yeast dough by any means. I would say it's more like a soft, custard type batter. The batter is spooned into hot grease and deep fried. The outside of the Zeppoli is deep fried while the inside has a slightly custard taste to it. Not liquid but just really soft. I don't remember if they were just slightly undercooked giving them that custard like center, or if my parents actually shot custard in them. Think of something like a donut with custard in it, they are also similar to Malasadas in Portuguese culture which are very popular in Hawaiian culture today. Here's another source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppoli

I can get a recipe for Zeppoli if you give me some time. My parents just moved and their old world recipes are buried in one of the numerous boxes they have.

In terms of location, my family is Sicilian and these were a common tradition in our family for dessert. I don't know if they are a common in Sicily or if they were hijacked from Naples.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 03:48:25 PM by DNA Dan »

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2007, 03:44:15 PM »
One thing I want to understand is, how does Italian flake pastry technique differ from French(croissant), and others. I have, so far, been unsuccessful in finding much in print that discusses Italian pastry techniques.
Thanks.

There is a 5 page discussion of pasta sfogliata in The Italian Baker by Carol Fields which also includes a number of recipes that use it. It's a book worth owning, if you don't already have it.

Bill/SFNM

Offline MTNpizza

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2007, 06:57:54 PM »
My parents used to make Zeppoli all the time. It isn't a yeast dough by any means. I would say it's more like a soft, custard type batter. The batter is spooned into hot grease and deep fried. The outside of the Zeppoli is deep fried while the inside has a slightly custard taste to it. Not liquid but just really soft. I don't remember if they were just slightly undercooked giving them that custard like center, or if my parents actually shot custard in them. Think of something like a donut with custard in it, they are also similar to Malasadas in Portuguese culture which are very popular in Hawaiian culture today. Here's another source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppoli

I can get a recipe for Zeppoli if you give me some time. My parents just moved and their old world recipes are buried in one of the numerous boxes they have.

In terms of location, my family is Sicilian and these were a common tradition in our family for dessert. I don't know if they are a common in Sicily or if they were hijacked from Naples.


That would be great if you could get a recipe!  Do you know if it is possible to make zeppoles from pizza dough?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2007, 07:45:23 PM »
Do you know if it is possible to make zeppoles from pizza dough?


It apparently hasn't stopped some people from trying: http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi?noframes;read=23317.

Peter

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2007, 02:20:04 AM »
That would be great if you could get a recipe!  Do you know if it is possible to make zeppoles from pizza dough?

I don't think that's possible. They puff up like a donut, but from what I can recall, the dough is not a donut (or pizza) dough at all. Donuts are cut from a sheet and floated on hot oil. The way I remember the zeppoli, the mixture was more like very thick fluffy pancake batter. You then take a tablespoon and drop one big spoonful into the hot oil. It falls into the oil and swirls around, keeping it's round form. It then floats around the top, you scoop it up, let it cool a bit, then sprinkle with powder sugar. mmmmmm.

Offline mrbthree

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2007, 01:06:10 PM »
DNA Dan,

Yes, please do post the recipe when you are able, and thank you very much!

Offline mrbthree

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2007, 01:17:19 PM »
Thanks Bill,
I had forgotten that Carol's book has a pastry section, and I do own a copy of it.
I have also learned that one of Nick Malgieri's books has a discussion of sfogliatelle, and that, of all people, Martha Stewart has a book out that includes a discussion of making these things as well. Who da thunk it?
I've become acquainted with an old Italian guy around here named Nando. When I asked him about making sfogliatelle, he told me to forget it and buy them frozen off the internet. He said they are very difficult to make and to do them properly, one can only turn out about 10 an hour. A remark like this just gets me going. Now, I really want to try to make them, more than ever. (I suppose this really belongs over on the sfogliatelle thread, my mistake)

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2007, 01:30:09 PM »
I got the recipe from my parents but I need to clarify a few things. (they are getting up there in age!)  I also searched online and this recipe is close to what they gave me:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Zeppole/Detail.aspx

The "secret" ingredient is actually Ricotta. I find it better to make my own by heating whole milk and whipping cream then acidifying with white vinegar. This isnt' a true ricotta, but it makes for a very decadent curd that makes great pastries. It whips well for fillings, and makes killer ravioli when mixed with fresh basil.

The trick with cooking zeppole is to have the heat high enough so the outside browns, while the inside is "undercooked". This makes them taste like they are filled, when actually you are eating the fresh riccota. This is a balancing act, it should be soft and moist, but not runny like the batter is. This is ususally an individual preference here. You could also cook them all the way and fill with cream or something else, custard would be delicious! It has eggs in it, so I would say don't store them or make them ahead of time. Cook and eat fresh. Also, most pastry chefs will know, that eating them warm is great, however the powder sugar melts if they are warm. If you want the sugar to remain, you need to let the buggers cool properly.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2007, 01:31:58 PM by DNA Dan »


Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2007, 03:07:36 PM »
Zeppole di San Giuseppe, the modern version, are made with choix pastry and topped with neapolitan pastry cream and a drop of cherry conserve.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2007, 04:52:30 PM »
Zeppole di San Giuseppe, the modern version, are made with choix pastry and topped with neapolitan pastry cream and a drop of cherry conserve.

The more reading I do the more "versions" I see of this delectable treat. The recipe above is for Zeppole di Ricotta. Apparently they all aren't made this way and there are several varieties of Zeppole. I suppose in that regard it is like pizza! The San Giuseppe sounds fantastic.

Offline mrbthree

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2007, 02:48:24 AM »
I would be very interested in knowing what is "neopolitan pastry cream". May we have a recipe for this pastry cream?
Thanks.

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2007, 07:53:53 AM »
Neapolitan pastry cream is made with lemon zest and a touch of vanilla.

Ciao

Offline Cetus

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Re: ZEPPOLES
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2007, 01:46:49 AM »
I would also like to cast my vote for more definitive info in Zeppoli. It is my understanding that they are a specialty of Napoli, or the San Guiseppe Zeppoli version is, at least. Most of the info I've found seem to consider it another kind of donut, without the hole. I have found recipes that call for yeast, but in a previous post by a fellow member, it was stated that they are made from a bigne dough, which is an unyeasted pastry dough. Can someone(read Marco) possibly provide us with an authentic recipe for San Guiseppe Zeppoli di Napoli?
In addition, does anyone in our fourm have experience making SFOGLIATELLA? They are another pastry of Napoli I am keen to make in an authentic manner. No frozen phyllo dough from the supermarket, thank you.
One thing I want to understand is, how does Italian flake pastry technique differ from French(croissant), and others. I have, so far, been unsuccessful in finding much in print that discusses Italian pastry techniques.
Thanks.
1 cup water,1/2 cup ricotta,1 pinch salt,1/2 cup confectioner's sugar
1/2 cup semolina,1 cup, 2 oz. flour,6 oz. butter,2 oz. strutto
1 pinch cinnamon,3 oz. candied orange peel, diced,1 egg yolk
 
 
Bring the water to a boil, add a pinch of salt,
 pour in the semolina, stirring so as not to form lumps.
Cook, stirring for about 8 mins., stirring constantly.
Let cool. Make a fontana with the flour. Put half of the butter,
a pinch of salt.... and as much water as necessary to knead the

dough to a smooth and elastic consistency.
Wrap the dough in a towel and let rest for an hour.
Sift the ricotta.... mix with the semolina, 6 tbs. sugar, a pinch of

cinnamon and the candied peel.

Roll out the pastry with a rolling pin to obtain a 25x18-in.

rectangle, 1/16-in. thick. Cut the pastry vertically into 4 strips and

place one on top of the other, brushing each one with melted

butter. Let rest for half an hour, and then roll up the stack of

dough.

Slice the roll into 10 equal pieces with a very sharp, floured knife.

Place the pieces on the pastry board and roll them gently with the

rolling pin, first vertically, in an upward direction, and then in a

downwards direction, to give them an oval shape.

Turn the ovals over, place a bit of ricotta filling in the middle of

each one, brush the edges with egg yolk, then fold the dough over

and press to seal.

 Brush the sfogliatelle with melted strutto and place on a paper

greased with butter. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 425F for 20

mins. Remove from the oven. Brush with melted butter again,

lower the temperature to 350F and bake for another 20 mins. Let

cool, sprinkle with confectioner's sugar ....Hey Enjoy*** Hope it

helps***
 
 

Offline mrbthree

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Re: ZEPPOLES/SFOGLIATELLE
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2007, 12:09:15 PM »
Cetus,
Thank you so much, I'm so happy to see this recipe.
I wonder if you could take a moment to provide this recipe using weights for all the ingredients?
If this is not convenient, can you tell me what is 2 oz. of flour by measure? How do you measure out 2 oz. of flour with measuring cups, since, your recipe calls for "1 cup, 2 oz. flour".
Also, what is strutto?
Thanks, again