Author Topic: What are some unique ingredients pizzerias will throw in their sauce?  (Read 1828 times)

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Offline Jackitup

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Anchovies, mash them up with a fork, fry in a good chunk of butter, add a little water, wine, brandy etc to keep from scorching it, add a 1/2 cup of sauce and turn off heat, use a spatula and scrape into the bulk of your sauce and whisk together. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes.
  Sardines, drain and make a sardine sammich on toast with thin sliced onions and mustard, open a beer!! :drool:

jon
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Offline Chef Manardee

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I got turned on to Anchovy Paste from a few things on America's Test Kitchen. In particular, their Chicken Stew. It added absolutely no fish flavor. It did add an addiction factor. MUST___ EAT___ MORE___ RIGHT___ NOW___ kind of thing. It's been in a few other things, including one or two pies' sauce. I just don't know the right ratio, but am going to focus on that and/or filets soon.

I'm looking forward to hearing what your sauce crusade turns out.

I've heard nothing but good things about Anchovy paste, which is funny to me given what it is. If you figure out the right ratio I would love to hear it because once I buy Anchovies (And not Sardines lol), I'm gonna have to figure the ratio as well! And thanks, hopefully something good comes out of this journey :)

Anchovies, mash them up with a fork, fry in a good chunk of butter, add a little water, wine, brandy etc to keep from scorching it, add a 1/2 cup of sauce and turn off heat, use a spatula and scrape into the bulk of your sauce and whisk together. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes.
  Sardines, drain and make a sardine sammich on toast with thin sliced onions and mustard, open a beer!! :drool:

jon

Thank you for that Jack! I was wondering how to prepare them. If paste is used, should it go through the same process?

And unfortunately there won't be as positive of a future for the Sardines like the one you beautifully expressed. When I say I hate fish, I mean I HATE fish lol. (I wish I didn't though, excellent protein source) Hopefully my dog will enjoy them though.  ;D
:chef:

Offline keylime73

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After trying a variety of things in the past couple years, what finally works for me is just a little salt (1/2-1 tsp in to 28oz can), some oregano (2 tsp) and olive oil (1 Tbsp) in my crushed tomatoes-- and I could live with just the salt and oregano. At one time or another I've tried most of the typical ingredients (including balsamic vinegar, which seems more like adding sugar than acid-- I would choose red wine vinegar over it, and using pecorino romano in lieu of salt, which adds its own funky thing but kind of kills the brightness of the tomatoes). Never been interested in trying fennel since that means Italian sausage.  I think I've accepted that perhaps unless you are making plain cheese, mostly clean and simple tomatoes is what you really want; although I do rather like onion and garlic if it doesn't get too busy, i.e.: there isn't a bunch of spices in the toppings-- processed meats and the like-- already.

Offline invertedisdead

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After trying a variety of things in the past couple years, what finally works for me is just a little salt (1/2-1 tsp in to 28oz can), some oregano (2 tsp) and olive oil (1 Tbsp) in my crushed tomatoes-- and I could live with just the salt and oregano. At one time or another I've tried most of the typical ingredients (including balsamic vinegar, which seems more like adding sugar than acid-- I would choose red wine vinegar over it, and using pecorino romano in lieu of salt, which adds its own funky thing but kind of kills the brightness of the tomatoes). Never been interested in trying fennel since that means Italian sausage.  I think I've accepted that perhaps unless you are making plain cheese, mostly clean and simple tomatoes is what you really want; although I do rather like onion and garlic if it doesn't get too busy, i.e.: there isn't a bunch of spices in the toppings-- processed meats and the like-- already.

I agree and feel the same way. Lately I've just been doing tomato and salt and putting the oregano over the cheese instead. A great tomato seems to stand on its own but oregano and or basil to taste can be nice.
Ryan

Offline bregent

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>Oh okay, I know exactly what that is then. I've tasted that in lasagna before and never knew
>what it was! I'm not a fan though, so I don't think it's present in their sauce. (Definitely not ruling it out though)

RE: fennel - Yeah, don't rule it out based on the flavor you get from sausage. With Italian sausage, fennel is really in your face. But used in much lower quantities it adds a nice dimension that's hard to identify. I use 0.2 grams per 28 oz crushed tomatoes.

Anchovies/paste does sound interesting. I'm going to try some  in my next sauce.
Bob

Offline Steve

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MSG is the essence of umami.

Yes, I know it gets a bad rap, but it's totally unjustified (contrary to popular belief, it does no more harm than eating... well... anchovies! ... and less salty too!)

I've eaten MSG my whole life and it really adds a savory flavor to meats and sauces.




Offline rparker

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I hope I am starting big enough, but not too big on the anchovy paste front. 1/2 tsp in 115g sauce. 14" pie.

Offline norma427

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These are the anchovies I am using in my sauce.  1 ½ anchovies ground up fine in a big can of Stanislaus sauce.  I use other ingredients too.  My customers say my pizza sauce is unique and very good tasting.  The sauce and cheese need to be balanced.  The anchovies look better after they are taken out of the cold olive oil.

Norma

Offline Steve

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Here's a great review on anchovies (I'm a huge anchovy fan -- I love to eat them straight out of the container).

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/10/taste-test-best-anchovies-anchovy-fillets-in-olive-oil.html

I've tried the Agostino Recca (that Norma recommends) and they are good. I just finished my bottle of Merro anchovies and they were good too, not too salty and very big and plump. I have some Ortiz anchovies coming soon, can't wait to try them (they consistently rank as the #1 brand).

Offline rparker

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I was limited to one or two choices in the grocery store when I got my jar of Anchovies. I've not tried them yet. The brand name is Bellino. I hope those are at least reputable.

Offline Steve

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I was limited to one or two choices in the grocery store when I got my jar of Anchovies. I've not tried them yet. The brand name is Bellino. I hope those are at least reputable.

Bellino was ranked dead-last in that review that I posted. I tried that brand (found them at Kroger) and they weren't bad, they did have a slight "off" flavor, but I enjoyed them nonetheless. I liked the Merro brand better (super large and plump, not as salty). Got those off Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006U0QVMK/?tag=pmak-20

These were very good (Norma uses these):
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0058DLW5G/?tag=pmak-20

Same brand, cheaper, supposedly just as good (I have some, haven't tried them yet):
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ETA7XFM/?tag=pmak-20

Offline rparker

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Bellino was ranked dead-last in that review that I posted.
:-D :-D :-D

Just my luck. Given the local grocery store's prices, I probably paid a healthy premium to boot.

I totally spaced that the article you linked was a review. I thought it was an all about anchovies and was saving the read for  later.   :-[   Reading now to catch up with the class, I find myself encouraged that the differences seem to get lost in recipes in their testing in dressing and sauce.  :chef: However, I was going to try them soon enough, but the comments about QC and odors do not make me feel comfy.

Sooo, thanks for the links. I gotta order some tomatoes today anyhow.  :chef:


Offline rparker

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1/2 tsp was only too much in that I had one spot where it did not blend in or mix well. That I know of, anyhow. I had 1/3rd of the pie. I saw no funny faces or odd reactions.

I already have a 1/16th tsp salt per 110g of sauce for one pie. I use mostly saltier cheeses, and I apply a decent amount of Pecorino on top of sauce. This enhances that flavor, save the one odd bite I had. I'd say it's a winner, but not required due to my aforementioned salty additions. I think that is to say that it was not a new flavor.

On the other hand, if you struggle to get this type of salty, savory thing going, this is a good way to get it. Just mix it really well.   ;D

my .02, anyhow.

Offline rparker

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Does anyone have a preferred brand of red wine vinegar?

Probably more importantly, does anyone have one they stay away from?

Roy

Offline Steve

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Does anyone have a preferred brand of red wine vinegar?

Probably more importantly, does anyone have one they stay away from?

Roy

Check out this review:

https://www.cooksillustrated.com/taste_tests/520-red-wine-vinegars




Offline petef

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Some unique things I've used in my sauce:
Sauce amount for these tips being 12 to 16 ounces

* Starting with empty pan, add 1 tbsp olive oil and 1 tbsp very finely minced onions. Saute just enough to flavor the oil and until the onions are softened, but not browned.

* Try using Classic Coke in place of sugar.
For starters use 1tsp Classic Coke for each tsp sugar. 
You can also try using Honey in a similar way.

* Use White vinegar or a combo of white and red wine vinegar, favoring white over red. I prefer 2 parts white to 1 part red. Add just 1/2 tsp at a time and train yourself to taste and add more until you obtain that perfect acidic (sharp) taste. You know you've added too much vinegar when you can distinctly taste the vinegar. Practice makes perfect.

* Always strive to balance acidic with sweetness and train yourself to taste for the desired acidic or sweet flavor. In other words, if you add 1tsp of vinegar, also add 1tsp of sugar or classic coke as a starting point. Then taste and add either  sweetner or acidic ingredients to your liking.

* Try adding very small amounts (1/8 ts or less) finely ground red hot Cheyenne pepper. This is not so much for heat, but just to add a little zing.
 
Try not to make too many changes at once because you won't
know exactly which one gave you the good or bad results.

---pete---
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 02:30:01 AM by petef »

Offline rparker

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Check out this review:

https://www.cooksillustrated.com/taste_tests/520-red-wine-vinegars
Thanks, Steve. I now remember the test segment on the ATK site on this. Kimball was incredulous that he picked Pompeian.  ::)

I forgot to bring the list with me to the store yesterday and ended up getting one not on the list. The cheap national, "Bertolli" brand. I used in some sausage roll dipping sauce and it came out much better than with previous attempts using a store brand.

Roy

Offline rparker

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Some unique things I've used in my sauce:
Sauce amount for these tips being 12 to 16 ounces

* Starting with empty pan, add 1 tbsp olive oil and 1 tbsp very finely minced onions. Saute just enough to flavor the oil and until the onions are softened, but not browned.

* Try using Classic Coke in place of sugar.
For starters use 1tsp Classic Coke for each tsp sugar. 
You can also try using Honey in a similar way.

* Use White vinegar or a combo of white and red wine vinegar, favoring white over red. I prefer 2 parts white to 1 part red. Add just 1/2 tsp at a time and train yourself to taste and add more until you obtain that perfect acidic (sharp) taste. You know you've added too much vinegar when you can distinctly taste the vinegar. Practice makes perfect.

* Always strive to balance acidic with sweetness and train yourself to taste for the desired acidic or sweet flavor. In other words, if you add 1tsp of vinegar, also add 1tsp of sugar or classic coke as a starting point. Then taste and add either  sweetner or acidic ingredients to your liking.

* Try adding very small amounts (1/8 ts or less) finely ground red hot Cheyenne pepper. This is not so much for heat, but just to add a little zing.
 
Try not to make too many changes at once because you won't
know exactly which one gave you the good or bad results.

---pete---

I had not given any thought at all to Cayenne. I bet that would be a great alternative to using black pepper if one did not want the rest of that black pepper taste. (I love black pepper, but still will give cayenne a try.)

Offline Jackitup

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I had not given any thought at all to Cayenne. I bet that would be a great alternative to using black pepper if one did not want the rest of that black pepper taste. (I love black pepper, but still will give cayenne a try.)

Aleppo pepper flakes!

jon
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

Offline Chef Manardee

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So many informative posts, I appreciate the input. Taking in everything I can read!

1/2 tsp was only too much in that I had one spot where it did not blend in or mix well. That I know of, anyhow. I had 1/3rd of the pie. I saw no funny faces or odd reactions.

I already have a 1/16th tsp salt per 110g of sauce for one pie. I use mostly saltier cheeses, and I apply a decent amount of Pecorino on top of sauce. This enhances that flavor, save the one odd bite I had. I'd say it's a winner, but not required due to my aforementioned salty additions. I think that is to say that it was not a new flavor.

On the other hand, if you struggle to get this type of salty, savory thing going, this is a good way to get it. Just mix it really well.   ;D

my .02, anyhow.

Thanks for the update rparker! I was worried about the ratio after Norma said she only uses 1 1/2 small fillets for a big can of Stanislaus (assuming #10 can). That would be like 1/6 of a fillet for the 28 oz can of tomatoes I usually use lol. Thanks for the salt info, I'll keep that in mind. :)
 
So I'm using Fish Sauce in place of Anchovys right now. (Label says "Simply Asia Thai Kitchen Premium-Fish Sauce)" The bottle says it's made from Anchovies so I'm assuming the flavor should be identical to fillets? (I despise anchovies, so I won't be trying them straight anytime soon lol) Also, I would need less Fish Sauce compared to actual anchovies right?
:chef:

Offline rparker

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So many informative posts, I appreciate the input. Taking in everything I can read!

Thanks for the update rparker! I was worried about the ratio after Norma said she only uses 1 1/2 small fillets for a big can of Stanislaus (assuming #10 can). That would be like 1/6 of a fillet for the 28 oz can of tomatoes I usually use lol. Thanks for the salt info, I'll keep that in mind. :)
 
So I'm using Fish Sauce in place of Anchovys right now. (Label says "Simply Asia Thai Kitchen Premium-Fish Sauce)" The bottle says it's made from Anchovies so I'm assuming the flavor should be identical to fillets? (I despise anchovies, so I won't be trying them straight anytime soon lol) Also, I would need less Fish Sauce compared to actual anchovies right?
I was wondering how that would translate, too. 1/8th for a 14-oz can, then divided by 3 pies. That's not much. 

Offline norma427

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I was wondering how that would translate, too. 1/8th for a 14-oz can, then divided by 3 pies. That's not much.

Roy,

If a little more is used it didn't hurt my sauce at the Pizza Expo.  I used one whole pretty big anchovy in about one and a half cans of the smaller size sauce cans.  Of course my sauce had to be watered down because of using the concentrate.  I tasted it before I went to compete and it tasted about like the sauce at market.  The anchovy I used was really crushed up.

Norma

Offline Jackitup

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I do the same Norma, smoosh it up with a fork and then toast it in some butter. Same with capers, out of the jar they are very pungent, fried in a bit of brown butter, completely different critter! same with garlic for that matter, in all 3, brings out the nutty and tames down the slap in the mouth :o Disperses better into what you add it to also, maybe a spot of wine to loosen it up a bit before adding.....me and the dish :P

jon
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Offline norma427

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I do the same Norma, smoosh it up with a fork and then toast it in some butter. Same with capers, out of the jar they are very pungent, fried in a bit of brown butter, completely different critter! same with garlic for that matter, in all 3, brings out the nutty and tames down the slap in the mouth :o Disperses better into what you add it to also, maybe a spot of wine to loosen it up a bit before adding.....me and the dish :P

jon

Jon,

Thanks for telling us what you do. 

Norma