Author Topic: Anyone else use buttermilk instead of water?  (Read 1625 times)

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Offline pnj

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Anyone else use buttermilk instead of water?
« on: May 02, 2007, 10:40:54 PM »
Howdy y'all.

First post here...

I've been making pizza for years and have recently (in the last five or so years) started really trying to improve on my pies.

I recently 'came up' with a dough I'm pretty happy with. It's pretty much the same basic recipe as everyone elses but I use cold buttermilk instead of water.

what I found was the cooler temp helps to retard the yeast. but I get chewy dough that is easy to work/shape and rises well on the edges. I don't know how much the buttermilk really helps but it must do something.

I've heard of people using sour dough starter and I may give this a try in my next batch. Does anyone have any experience with using sour dough starter?

My recipe, for those who care....

1 1/4 cups of buttermilk, cold (I leave it out of the fridge while I get the rest of the ingrediants out, it's cold but not freezing)
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon yeast (i use quick/bread machine yeast)
2 1/4 cups of bread flour
large dash of cyan pepper (optional of course)

I leave this out at room temp for a few hours then refrigerate for a day or two.




Online Pete-zza

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Re: Anyone else use buttermilk instead of water?
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2007, 12:36:31 AM »
pnj,

Welcome to the forum.

Nice looking pizza.

You will find quite a bit of information on using starters here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/board,37.0.html, and also in the Neapolitan style pizza section at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/board,26.0.html.

Peter

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Anyone else use buttermilk instead of water?
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2007, 10:21:41 AM »
pnj,

After I entered my last post, I did some research on the use of buttermilk to satisfy my own curiosity. I had heard of using buttermilk in pizza dough although it is rarely done by professional pizza operators because of cost and other considerations. The primary contributions of buttermilk are the butterfat content, which adds flavor to the finished crust, and the lactose sugars in the buttermilk that contribute to increased crust browning. Usually the crust will be fairly soft, in part because the finished crust browns up fairly quickly and the pizza can't bake long enough to give the crust a crispy characteristic.

When I researched buttermilk (liquid, cultured, lowfat), I learned that it constitutes about 90% water, 0.9% fat, 4.6% sugar, and 3.3% protein. A cup of buttermilk weighs about 245 grams, or about 8.64 ounces. So, in your case, if you are using 1 1/4 cups of buttermilk of the type referenced above, that comes to 10.8 ounces. If 90% of the buttermilk is water, then the water content is 9.72 ounces. You didn't indicate how you measured out your bread flour, but if measured out in the way recommended by the flour producers, 2 1/4 cups would weigh about 10.25 ounces. On that basis, the hydration based on only the water content of the buttermilk would be around 95% (9.72/10.25 = about 95%). It would be a few percent less if the protein in the buttermilk is added to the flour weight. Either way, the numbers would be unworkably high. I assume that you are using a fairly "heavy" cup in measuring out the flour or possibly you are adding more flour on the bench at some point. Can you clarify your methods in this regard?

Peter

Offline pnj

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Re: Anyone else use buttermilk instead of water?
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2007, 11:43:18 AM »
actually, those measurments are kind of rough.

first, I use a bread machine to mix my dough, set on the dough setting.

I measure the flour with a measuring cup, I reach into the flour and scoop up flour, level it off w/ my finger.

During the mixing process I add flour/liquid so it's not too wet or dry. The dough is pretty wet though, when it's done. It just about sticks to your fingers....maybe even does a little.

and yes, I do add just a tad bit flour on the counter when shaping the pie. I don't own a pizza peal(Peel?) so the dough may be wetter then it might be if it needed to slide on/off a peel. I build the pie on the stone as quickly as I can.

Does that help answer your questions? You can see from the picture that the pies turn out quite well...


 

pizzapan