Author Topic: pizza making equipment  (Read 2147 times)

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Offline abcpizza

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pizza making equipment
« on: May 15, 2007, 05:46:47 AM »
Hi All, I am baby face here and thinking of starting pizza business in my area. Could anybody here know about the equipment? What are they and how much would that cost? Should there be a step-by-step list for dummy, that would be great.
Thanks in advance.


Offline grovemonkey

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Re: pizza making equipment
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007, 07:20:20 AM »
If your a dummy, you probably should stay out of business.  Dummies find doing business extremely difficult.  If your not a dummy, you'll be able to figure out the answers to your questions you ask by using GOOGLE and searching the forums.  It's all right before you, you just have to look.  Plus it will be good practice for if you ever actually get a business set up.  If you think finding the answers to your questions is difficult, running a business is going to much more challenging.  Why don't you see what you come up with on your own and post it to the forums, I'd love to see how far you can get with it on your own.  Good luck!

grove.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: pizza making equipment
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007, 08:32:13 AM »
abcpizza,

I'd like to suggest that you go to the PMQ Think Tank forum at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewforum.php?f=6 and read as much as you can there, including material in the archives, both of which can be searched. That forum is frequented mainly by professional pizza operators, some of whom may have started from scratch. I think you will find that there are no generic answers for the questions you have at this point, so if you decide to pose your questions at that forum you will want to be as specific as you can as to what you want to do. Otherwise you are unlikely to get much response to your requests for help. Key factors will be how much experience you have in the pizza or general restaurant business, what capital you have available to use to start and maintain the business until you can become profitable, where you plan to open the pizzeria, the planned size of your pizzeria, the demographics you will be serving, competition you will be facing, what kinds of pizzas and other foods you plan to serve, what recipes you have, and so on. Once you pass these tests, the equipment part is far easier to deal with.

Good luck.

Peter


Offline abcpizza

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Re: pizza making equipment
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2007, 08:29:42 AM »
First of all, I would very much like to thank Grove and Peter for your advice. Both of you gave me a roughly idea regarding starting business or Pizza business.

I would still describe myself as a dummy since I have been delivering pizzas for local Pizza Hut for 2 years.
I haven't gained insight into business management of Pizza Hut, the worldwide franchise, but from my point of view, it's not that hard to plan,promote,run and manage a small business as I was studying international trade in Uni and have been working for a few different industries as different role such as marketing, sales, advertising. I am possitive that once I make my first Pizza which is same or similar quality as Pizza Hut, it wouldn't be any problem for me to run my business profitably.

What really worries me is the quality of Pizza, are there lots of know-how with Pizza Hut? I wouldn't start a business producing soft drink like cola and compete with Coca Cola or Pepsi as so far as I knoe, there are some sort of know-how in it.

Should anybody there could lift me up regarding these ideas? Thanks in advance.

Ta..

Online Pete-zza

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Re: pizza making equipment
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2007, 09:45:49 AM »
abcpizza,

I can't talk specifically about Pizza Hut, but most know how about the pizza products sold by most of the big franchisors (e.g., Little Caesar's, Domino's, Papa John's, etc.) resides at commissaries and other facilities where bags of pizza flour mix are prepared for store use or where dough balls are prepared fresh or frozen or pre-formed into skins for delivery and use at the store level. That way, low cost labor with little in the way of dough making skills or knowledge can be used in the individual stores to prepare the dough to make pizzas. Some of that know how may be proprietary in nature, and the employees involved no doubt have signed agreements (usually at the time of hiring) not to divulge such proprietary information.

Most individual pizza operators, including many who at one time worked for the major pizza operators, usually choose not to copy the products of the companies where they formerly worked because they know that they can't compete with those companies on price because the companies have a major cost advantage because of economies of scale, plus the companies have deep marketing pockets. Rather, the individual pizza operators will try to differentiate themselves from the big companies by using higher quality ingredients to make better pizzas and by offering many other items that the big companies often do not offer, such as specialty or gourmet pizzas and a wide variety of appetizers, side dishes, salads, etc. Plus, they rely on marketing and promotional tactics not employed by the big operators in their area. The objective is usually not to achieve the same quality of product as the big companies, but rather a better one since that is about the only way they will be able to charge a higher price. That approach usually places most pizza operators between the low-price big companies and the gourmet operators at the high end that cater to customers with high disposable incomes who do not frequent the low-cost places. They know that it is not wise to dance at the feet of elephants.

If you go to the PMQ Think Tank forum as I suggested, you will see that it is a lot more difficult to establish and operate a successful pizzeria than most people think. It is not an enterprise to go into without doing a lot of upfront homework and preparation, not to mention sufficient capital to survive until profitability kicks in.

Peter


 

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