Author Topic: Shakey's sauce recipe??  (Read 145918 times)

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Offline SquirrelFlight

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #180 on: February 29, 2012, 04:08:44 PM »
In my experience, the lettuce and tomatoes are messy enough to really preclude eating it fast   :D

Thanks for the links, ME, but the toppings really are straight-forward.  In fact, I've been working on frying my own beans since you can get pounds of dried pinto beans for the same price as a small can.  The taco pizzas I liked best were the seasoned the beans (no "pizza" sauce underneath - the seasoned beans *are* the sauce), but left the ground beed unseasoned.

The part that is still eluding me is the perfect crust to put it on.... which maybe I've found  ;D


Offline Extra Cheese

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #181 on: January 19, 2014, 06:50:03 PM »
I hope this is the best place to post this tidbit.  I introduced myself to the forum with this in my post:

"I had a boyfriend in the late 70's/early 80's that worked as an assistant manager at Shakey's while we were in college.  Sometimes I would help him close up so that he could get out in time to study or have fun. 

I tried to figure out what was in that sauce back then and found one very unusual ingredient on the spice pack's list. 
I remember them mixing up the sauce at closing time in a "bucket" and they would let it sit at least overnight, sometimes longer.  Most of the ingredients were generic and the pack said "spices".  There was one standout ingredient that I noticed.  I'm here to share that info.  I read the entire sauce thread and didn't see it listed.  It appears that there were some changes to formulations over the years.  I guarantee that this ingredient adds ZING!"


Well, that ingredient that surprised me was mustard.  So, I use Coleman's dry mustard in many of my sauces to add a bit of zing to my sauce.  It seems to help round out the flavor.  You just need a tiny bit.  It is an ingredient in many traditional American Chinese restaurant mustards too.
(Not the vinegary mustards that are in packets.) 

I hope this tip helps! 


Offline Zing

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #182 on: January 19, 2014, 10:42:24 PM »
Welcome, EC!

Thanks for your contribution. Elsewhere on this forum is a photograph of the cardboard box today's fully prepared Shakey's pizza sauce is shipped in. There is currently no mustard listed on the ingredients declaration. I will add some mustard to my next batch of sauce.

Offline yonkiman

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #183 on: February 05, 2014, 08:55:43 AM »
So, after almost 10 years of recollections and discussion, does anyone feel they have a dough/sauce recipe that really nails that original 70s Shakey's flavor?  Have we converged on a final recipe?

In my mind 70s/early-80s Shakey's is still the perfect pizza.  Would love to see a complete recipe someone like I (not a natural in the kitchen) could follow.

Offline Zing

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #184 on: February 05, 2014, 10:39:01 PM »
No, we have not converged on a final recipe. There are a number of reasons for this, mostly because there was quite a bit of variation from franchisee-to-franchisee and from one section of the country to the other, partly because they were buying ingredients from different foodservice distributors. So the question becomes, "which particular Shakey's"? Other reasons are that none of the previous posters who worked for Shakey's ever wrote down details. Back in the 70's, franchisees were already used pre-packaged add-ins to the flour and tomato puree or other tomato product they were using. Also, food service cheeses may not be the same as back then. Sadly, interest is waning just like interest in the Howard Johnson chain has waned. I myself am concentrating on the current product as sold in Southern California. My memory and senses are not good enough to know if I nailed the recipe from, say, the Washington, DC area, correctly.

Offline Skinny

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #185 on: April 08, 2014, 02:53:59 PM »
This thread brings back memories! As a kid we used to eat at one of the original Shakey's. It was somewhere near Walnut Creek California. The waiters wore straw boater hats and red and white striped shirts. They had an old player piano playing ragtime music.  Dad and mom would have a pitcher of beer and us kids would have a pitcher of orange soda. That was my first memories of eating pizza. That was over 50 years ago and I remember it like it was yesterday. :D
Clayton

Offline Old Shakeys Cop

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #186 on: July 04, 2014, 02:39:37 PM »
Nice post Lightmeter, it takes me back. By the way the Cheese mix was supposed to be 80/10/10. Keep the memories alive!

Offline billbird2111

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #187 on: August 21, 2014, 02:45:01 PM »
So, after almost 10 years of recollections and discussion, does anyone feel they have a dough/sauce recipe that really nails that original 70s Shakey's flavor?  Have we converged on a final recipe?

In my mind 70s/early-80s Shakey's is still the perfect pizza.  Would love to see a complete recipe someone like I (not a natural in the kitchen) could follow.

I think Shakey Johnson may have taken that original recipe to his grave. If anyone really had it, it probably would have been revealed by now. The fact that it hasn't tells me something. I've seen lots of employee comments about big cans of tomato sauce mixed with big spice packets. That came about after Shakeys had grown into a very large franchise -- probably right about the time that Shakey Johnson sold out.

I remember doing the same type of mixing for another, competing, pizza chain called Rico's Pizza, which also got its start in Sacramento and is still here. The franchise owner's name was "Mickey." One night, while mixing an emergency round of dough, Mickey asked a nearby employee to check on it. The unnamed employee stuck his finger in the dough and yelled out: "IT'S STILL STICKY, MICKEY."

That employee was fired that night as I recall. I would follow him out the door a few weeks later. I had a hard time learning how to properly toss pizza dough. In fact, many of my large pizza creations came out shaped like footballs. While that may be a great skill for today's market -- it didn't work in 1979.

Shakeys was already a big deal by the time I came of age in Modesto (near Sacramento) in the 1970's. As a kid, there was no finer treat than going to Shakeys Pizza Parlor, which was built to resemble an old farmhouse type shack. I always wondered why they didn't have a nicer location until I got around to visiting other restaurants and found the locations to be exactly the same! Today, that old Shakeys location still exists. I'm not sure what place calls it home now, but it's probably nothing like Shakeys!

I've found the notations about the addition of citric acids and mustard to be quite interesting. I love spicy sauces that carry a special "ZING" to them. There aren't many of them left.

Offline billbird2111

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #188 on: August 21, 2014, 02:48:12 PM »
One thing I forgot to add is the neon sign for the original Shakeys pizza parlor still exists. It's been preserved in a local watering hole in East Sacramento. It's a beautiful thing to look at. It's quite old -- and a little marked up -- but still lights up just as brightly as it ever did.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #189 on: August 22, 2014, 01:12:40 PM »
Hi Billbird


Hello from a Modesto native (now in Alabama). Welcome to the forum.  :D


Rico's is still in the area but "nothing"... not even a hint of being the same pizza. Boy do I miss those monster sized party pizzas. :drool:


So, if you have any insider info, I'd of course appreciate it.  :angel:


I spoke with one of the current Ricos owners at the Turlock location. He said that their family took over all the Ricos and that they also own the "Strings Italian Restaurants" that have shown up in the central valley in the last decade or two.  He said they are actually a Greek family.




_______________________________


Speaking of sauces and acids.... My Dad and I (both super-tasters) would go round and round about whether or not Shakey's sauce had vinegar in it. This was actually a strange event. My dad loved vinegar and I can only tolerate it under special conditions, so if it "was" vinegar we should have been in agreement.  ???


So, all these years I've been operating under the assumption that maybe the pepperoni was "old-world style" that was made with vinegar, and that might have been what he was tasting.


Now, I am currently working on a Tapatia sauce clone. When you smell this sauce you'd swear it had vinegar...the aroma and the nose tingle...but "when I taste it", it clearly isn't vinegar. Vinegar isn't even an ingredient, it only has acidic acid. I thought "yes"!!! That would explain Everything   :o [size=78%]   [/size]


So I've made a note to try it first when I take on this sauce again and its on my list to order online.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


Offline Lydia

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #190 on: August 22, 2014, 02:16:12 PM »
I have another treat for the shakeys fans out there.


I came across this on a search binge and what a find  :chef:


I tried attaching this a link but got an error message  ???  so try cut and paste in browser window.


http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19881215&id=paNRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=nhIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5888,4081280


Its a recipe given Milwaukee Sentinel December 15, 1988 by the one and only Tom Miller, former legacy owner of the Shakeys in West Ellis.  They annually make the mojo potatoes for the state fair.


Quote
Tom Miller, owner sent the recipe. Although the breading recipe, a seasoned flour that lightly coats the chicken is secret, Miller gave the marinade ingredients and directions on how to prepare the chicken at home.


Shakey's Golden Fried Chicken


3 T beef bouillon
3 T oregano
3 T black pepper
3 T garlic powder
6 T salt
1/2 gallon cold water
8-9 piece chicken, cleaned
Seasoned flour to coat


Combine seasoning and mix with water to make a marinade.
Marinate chicken 24-36 hours in refrigerator.
When ready to cook, rinse off marinade and discard.
Coat chicken with seasoned flour mixture and deep fat fry in 325 degree oil for 11 minutes.






makes 4-5 servings




Lydias Notes:


* I do recall seeing beef boullion next to the Lawry's food service bucket of seasoning (Modesto, McHenry Ave location), but I assumed this was for the spaghetti sauce not the chicken  :-\
* 9 piece cut would be the vintage KFC cut. The keel is separated from the chicken breast.
* I've seen mentioned that the "Kentucky Colonels" is the right breading but I've tried it a couple of times and it wasn't right.
* For mojos GM AP was perfect but had to use fine popcorn salt.
* 11 minutes tends to indicate pressure frying times
* Henny Penny pressure fryers were used by Shakeys restaurants.


In addition to that I thought I might mention that the The Millers have another business, Baker’s Quality Pizza Crusts in Waukesha, which began as the commissary supplying crusts to the numerous Shakey’s restaurants in the area but now supplies other restaurants. Also, they expect to return yearly to State Fair to sell Mo-Joes and pizza.


But to my knowledge current shakeys out west use Pizza blends, now owned by C&H Gunther and White Lily flour.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 02:28:07 PM by Lydia »
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline amiart

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #191 on: October 04, 2014, 12:34:05 AM »
Attached is an original menu from Shakey's on the Rockville Pike (Rockville, MD), circa 1975 (from my own collection of crap). Check out those prices  :o

I've also just learned that the building was finally demolished a few week ago.  :'(

Enjoy the menu.
Page 1 of 2

If it matters, There is a tiny bit of possibly helpful information.. on this menu ?
It states from the Giant 750 degree ovens.. Is that bit of information helpful in anyway ?

Offline Zing

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #192 on: October 06, 2014, 11:37:40 PM »
If it matters, There is a tiny bit of possibly helpful information.. on this menu ?
It states from the Giant 750 degree ovens.. Is that bit of information helpful in anyway ?
That line about "from the 750 degree" ovens appears in a lot of vintage Shakey's advertising. I even have a picture of a oven used in a Shakey's franchise in the Midwest somewhere where that 750 degree number was painted on the oven. They certainly are not using that temperature today; present conveyor ovens run about 475 degrees Farenheit. I don't recall what people who worked at Shakey's 30-40 years ago said about baking temperature, but 750 sounds kind of high. The ovens may have been able to reach 750 degrees F, but that is not to say they were set to that figure on the thermostat.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Shakey's sauce recipe??
« Reply #193 on: October 07, 2014, 02:00:57 PM »
That line about "from the 750 degree" ovens appears in a lot of vintage Shakey's advertising. I even have a picture of a oven used in a Shakey's franchise in the Midwest somewhere where that 750 degree number was painted on the oven. They certainly are not using that temperature today; present conveyor ovens run about 475 degrees Farenheit. I don't recall what people who worked at Shakey's 30-40 years ago said about baking temperature, but 750 sounds kind of high. The ovens may have been able to reach 750 degrees F, but that is not to say they were set to that figure on the thermostat.

I echo those comments.  I have seen that 750 degree oven temperature on a number of Shakey's advertising, mainly from the 60's.  After that it seemed to go away.  They were using either Blodgett or Baker's Pride deck ovens back then, as most pizza restaurants did.  I am sure the methods and formulas of the original Shakey's recipes have been tweaked and modified over the years.  My most recent visit to a Shakey's was this past June in Anaheim, CA, and they, too, were using the conveyor ovens, which I typically am not fond of.  They don't generate the heat of a good deck oven (as evidenced by the final product) but they do makes things quicker and consistent, which is what chains typically value more than quality.
The Shakey's in Oroville, CA still uses a traditional deck oven (or at least they did in 2010 and 2012 when I visited there).

-ME
Let them eat pizza.


 

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