Author Topic: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust  (Read 11168 times)

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Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2007, 02:08:23 AM »
Bryan....A 100% whole grain crust is the holy grail of pizza. I have found that in order to create a whole grain crust that is relatively light and flavorfull you must employ several techniques.

High hydration, at least some finely ground flour and special dough handling "tricks" to fully develop and strengthen the small amount of gluten present in whole grains.

I'll be making an another attempt at 100% whole grain pizza again this weekend and I think I can nail this recipe soon.

Now if we can just get the forum admins to create a "Healthy Whole Grain" pizza category, that would be nice. If we can have a category for "Desert pizza" and "Thick Style" then why not whole grain pizza?

       Villa Roma
« Last Edit: September 28, 2007, 07:57:06 AM by Villa Roma »


Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2007, 02:14:24 AM »
Villa, Do you have a link or could you shed some more info for me? Thanks, Man  8)

Bryan.....Not sure what you're looking for here but if you talk to a doctor or nutritionist and ask them if whole grains are more healthy than white flour, they can help you out. You can also just google "colon clogging white flour" or "is white flour bad for you" etc. Eat more whole grains, your colon will thank you for it! There's nothing more important than your good health.

      Villa Roma
« Last Edit: September 25, 2007, 02:34:03 AM by Villa Roma »

Offline Furo

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2007, 08:59:02 AM »
A whole grain catagory would be a nice addition to the list, I sure many of us would like to find a healthier way to enjoy our favorite pie! It might take a little longer in preperation or a change of mind set as to texture and flavor but if it helps us then we can live better. Long life, good love, sweet wine, and healthfull food (especially pizza!), one need not ask for more!
Woody.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2007, 10:19:26 AM »
From time to time, usually in response to a popular new diet book or craze or the results of a major health study, people get guilt feelings about eating pizza. Usually the reaction to such concerns by those who have a vested interest in the status quo (e.g., people who make, sell and promote pizza) is to become defensive and try to make out a case that pizza is really a healthy food, especially when “eaten in moderation” (the canard of anyone who sells anything that is suspect health-wise). The other common reaction is to suggest ways of modifying existing dough formulations and using healthier toppings to make pizza healthier overall. An example of the latter approach is articles like these:
http://www.pmq.com/mag/2003november_december/healthbuildingpizza.shtml and
http://www.pmq.com/healthy_pizza.shtml. For a while, people make adjustments in their diets, maybe take a few more vitamin supplements, exercise more, and generally eat healthier but, invariably, the health issue blows over and people go back to their old ways. Feeling better about matters, they are then likely to eat even more unhealthy food. The cycle is vicious and nothing the government or anyone else has advocated has worked. The ubiquity of food and its low cost have combined to create health issues that are bound to be with us for a long time.

I personally think that the pizza choices are quite clear: you either eat less pizza of the “unhealthy” variety or you make the product healthier, as Villa Roma, charbo and others on this forum have done. In my case, I eat “bad” pizza in moderation and I alter the rest of my daily diet to balance things out. Yet, I applaud those who have taken the other path.

It is not in my jurisdiction as a Moderator to create a new pizza category. However, if anyone is able to convince Steve, the Administrator of the forum, to create another pizza category, I am willing to move existing posts to that new category. Since “healthy” is a charged word, I might suggest something like “Whole-grain and Multi-grain Pizzas”.

Peter

Offline Furo

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2007, 01:39:25 PM »
How about it Steve? Is there a chance of having a "Multi and Whole Grain" catagory? I have noticed that the topic of whole wheat use has come up numerous times and it might be nice to have a grouping of the questions and ideas pertaining to the subject. I agree with Peter that a lot of people are quick to try the newest diet craze but eventually fall off the wagon however some folks (my self included) have had to modify our diets because of poor choices in the past and family health history, others may just be searching for a more wholesome or rustic / back to basics pizza diet. What ever their reasoning for trying to change some of their eating habits if they can find a source for ideas and comradery it might be of benefit to them and others.
I guess I better step down from my podium now, sorry if I began to preach on the subject.
Woody.
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Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2007, 03:32:24 PM »
Thank you very much preacher Furo for that fire and brimstone pizza sermon! Let's face it, whole grain pizza is a legitimate category and a lot of restaurants offer some sort of whole grain pizza. Who knows, this could be the next big thing. I think we can make a pizza that is good tasting and healthy.

      Villa Roma

Offline Bryan S

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2007, 11:16:20 PM »
Bryan.....Not sure what you're looking for here but if you talk to a doctor or nutritionist and ask them if whole grains are more healthy than white flour, they can help you out. You can also just google "colon clogging white flour" or "is white flour bad for you" etc. Eat more whole grains, your colon will thank you for it! There's nothing more important than your good health.

      Villa Roma
Was just looking for info on what refined white flour does to you and your colon. Found plenty online about it. :o  I picked up a bag of KA whole wheat white flour today and let the experiments begin. I have the HM whole wheat white, HM Rye, and now the KA whole wheat white.  ;D
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.

Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2007, 01:48:09 AM »
Was just looking for info on what refined white flour does to you and your colon. Found plenty online about it. :o  I picked up a bag of KA whole wheat white flour today and let the experiments begin. I have the HM whole wheat white, HM Rye, and now the KA whole wheat white.  ;D

Good for you Bryan. Try to ease into whole the grain pizza scene gradually. You may want to try a 25% whole grain crust and then progress up until you find what's right for your taste, especially if you have children or a wife that doesn't share your enthusiasm for healthy eating.

I'm going to make 66% and 100% whole grain pizzas this weekend and I'll be sure to post pictures of my results. I'm going to have to see if I can get some KA white whole wheat flour to experiment with. I just don't like paying the high shipping costs KA charges. Ten pounds of flour cost $15 in shipping charges! :o

       Villa Roma

« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 02:12:10 AM by Villa Roma »

Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2007, 02:00:46 AM »


I personally think that the pizza choices are quite clear: you either eat less pizza of the “unhealthy” variety or you make the product healthier, as Villa Roma, charbo and others on this forum have done. In my case, I eat “bad” pizza in moderation and I alter the rest of my daily diet to balance things out. Yet, I applaud those who have taken the other path.



Peter


Pete-zza.....Well stated post as always. Looks like whole grain pizza is in the minority but maybe if people see that they can make at least a 50% crust that tastes good, they may want to give it a try.

I have found that most whole grain recipes are either very heavy and/or don't taste good. We're out to change that.

        Villa Roma

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2007, 07:44:29 AM »
Villa Roma,

Earlier this year, I read a fascinating article ("Unhappy Meals") on the subject of diet, health and nutrition on the online NY Times. For those who are interested, it can be seen at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?_r=1&oref=slogin. Although I have been a student of nutrition all of my adult life and my diet is about 90% vegetarian, the article was a real eye opener for me (it’s actually quite scary) and gave me pause to think about everything I put into my mouth, including my beloved pizza which, in my case, falls within the remaining 10% of my diet.

Peter


Offline November

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2007, 07:30:45 PM »
While whole grains contain more micro-nutrients, they also contain more fat as well.  What one is trying to achieve health-wise is really what should dictate the details of their diet.  If you really want a wallop of micro-nutrients, you could just eat meat, as animal tissues store them in abundance.  Given that many realize eating meat has its drawbacks, "eating less is better" can't always be fully accepted based on what is known through epigenetics.  There are people living in poverty who easily fit the mold of "light" eaters because of circumstances beyond their control, but in poverty situations people are also often malnourished in the sense of being unhealthy, not just underweight.  It may be the case for many people that because of genetic predisposition, what they've eaten in their past, or environmental conditions; no amount of "whole" foods can supply their micro-nutrient needs if the overall amount of food is low.  Selective human dependance on naturally derived medicine is one example where even a "normal" amount of healthy food isn't enough, let alone a small amount.

These days I eat about 18 meals a week with 3 of them having a major meat component (chicken or fish), 4-6 of them being pizza (2-3 having a single meat topping), and the rest is a combination of whole and processed grain products (e.g. noodles, rice, flatbread, cereal) and vegetables (mostly legumes).

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Offline Bryan S

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2007, 10:04:39 PM »
Try to ease into whole the grain pizza scene gradually. You may want to try a 25% whole grain crust and then progress up until you find what's right for your taste, especially if you have children or a wife that doesn't share your enthusiasm for healthy eating.
OK I went with a 50/50 for a trial run. I used Harvest King Bread Flour and KA whole wheat white, which is not white, but tan. No need to worry about getting nice color on the crust, it's like Prego, it's in there.  ;D  As far as the grain of the wheat flour goes it looked like reg flour, it was ground very fine.  8) Villa, I'm going the cold ferment route on my dough since that's what I always do. I see you do a same day/1 day dough. I'll post my results next week, Tues or Wed. I'll probably make another dough ball up tomorrow with the HK and use the HM whole wheat white for a comparrison of the 2 wheat flours.  :pizza:
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.

Offline Villa Roma

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2007, 10:50:52 AM »
Here's the results of my whole grain test pizzas. The first two are 66% whole grain (33% HM rye and 33% HM whole wheat, 33% GM Harvest King) and the last two are 100% whole wheat. For the 100% whole wheat pizzas I used GM whole wheat on the first and Hodgsons mills stone ground graham flour on the second.

Cooked on the LBE at 650 degrees for 3-3 1/2 minutes.

  Eatin good in the neighborhood.....Villa Roma
« Last Edit: October 01, 2007, 02:50:36 AM by Villa Roma »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Question about level of nutrition in the best pizza crust
« Reply #33 on: September 30, 2007, 11:31:22 AM »
Villa Roma,

Tom Lehmann recently (Sept. 27, ’07) entered a post on whole-wheat doughs (including a blend of whole wheat and regular white flour) at the Pizza Today bulletin board at
http://www.pizzatoday.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=1&t=001065. For convenience, I have copied and pasted the post below. I have read several Lehmann posts in the past concerning whole-wheat doughs but what was fairly new in the latest post is the idea of hydrating the whole-wheat flour separately, for about 45-60 minutes. In the past, Tom’s advice was more along the lines as discussed in this PMQ Think Tank post: http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi?noframes;read=20067. Tom also discusses whole-wheat doughs here: http://www.pmq.com/mag/200705/article.php?story=lehmann.

Here is the Lehmann Pizza Today post (which I have edited slightly to improve readability):

You can make a good "wheat" pizza using your regular dough formula with half of the flour replaced with whole wheat flour. You will need to make a slight change to your procedure though to make a really good crust. In a separate container, put the whole wheat flour and 61% of the flour's weight as water into the container. Allow this to soak/hydrate for 45 to 60 minutes, then add to the mixing bowl along with the white flour and more water equal to 56% of the weight of the white flour. Now you can add the rest of the ingredients except for the oil and mix for two minutes, add the oil and mix for one more minute at low speed, then mix at medium speed for 8 to 10 minutes. The dough should feel a little tacky, that's normal. Take the dough to the bench and process as you would your normal, white pizza dough.

To make a "whole wheat" crust you must replace all of the white flour with whole wheat flour. Put it into a suitably large container, add water equal to 61% of the weight of whole wheat flour and stir together so it looks like oatmeal. Allow this to soak/hydrate for 45 to 60 minutes, then add to the mixing bowl. Now, add the rest of the ingredients except for the oil and mix for two minutes at low speed. Add the oil and mix one more minute at low speed, then mix 8 to 10 minutes at medium speed. The dough will feel tacky after mixing, this is normal. Scale and ball the dough as normal, then process as you would your white pizza dough. Wheat and whole wheat pizza doughs do not keep well much beyond 48 hours. For a little variety, you might want to substitute honey for any sugar that you might be using in your dough formula. I personally like to add about 3 to 4% honey to these formulas for the flavor that the honey provides. Wheat and whole wheat crusts will not be real crispy, but instead, they will be slightly crispy and little chewy.

You can buy whole wheat flour from any flour supplier, or if you want, you can also get it from your local supermarket in the baking supplies section.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


Peter

EDIT (1/25/13): Since the link to the above article is no longer operative, see the Wayback Machine link to the same article at http://web.archive.org/web/20080121222757/http://www.pmq.com/mag/200705/article.php?story=lehmann
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 06:37:20 PM by Pete-zza »