Author Topic: Seeds or no seeds?  (Read 2406 times)

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Offline pizzaJoe

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Seeds or no seeds?
« on: September 13, 2007, 12:56:40 PM »
Hi,

Been a while since I've last posted but I've still been up to my own slow paced experimentation.

I've been working on my sauces lately.  I've been using the Cento San Marzano DOP tomatoes, prepared two different ways.

First way, I just throw the can (minus basil) into a food processor, blend to consistency, season it a little and into the fridge for a few days.  This sauce has tomato seeds in it.

Second way, I use a food mill and grind up the Cento tomatoes, season it a little, maybe thicken with some tomato paste and into the fridge for a few days before I use it.  The sauce has no seeds in it (the food mill doesn't pass them).

I wondering what are the implications of seeds versus no seeds?  I don't remember who but I thought someone had told me that the seeds can add a bit of a bitter taste to the sauce although I'm not tasting that in my experiments.

Just curious...   ;)

Thanks!
PizzaJoe


Offline yaddayaddayadda

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2007, 03:50:47 PM »
I'm using the same tomatoes currently and don't remove seeds. If there's a bitter taste, I can't detect it. I'm LLAAAAZZZYYYY.

Offline DWChun

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2007, 10:23:16 PM »
My current sauce is simply de-seeded Eden Organic canned whole roma tomatoes that have been pulsed in a blender to a consistency thinner than "chunky" but thicker than "pureed". I only season the sauce when I put together my pies with some sea salt.

I haven't noticed any significant bitterness in my sauces with seeds but I do know that when I don't include seeds, the sauce has a brighter taste.


DW

Offline pizzaJoe

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2007, 11:29:27 PM »
DW,

How do you de-seed your sauce?  I find the food mill workable but a bit cumbersome.

Thanks.

Joe
PizzaJoe

Offline DWChun

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2007, 01:14:17 AM »
Joe,

I'm afraid my way is more cumbersome than a food mill...I just use a knife, slice open the tomatoes and drain the seeds/liquid over a plastic fine mesh sifter. Most of the seeds come out and whatever is left, I remove with the tip of the knife. It takes a bit of time but I like the hands-on aspect of the approach. I also remove the veins of the tomatoes while I'm at it. I then pulse the flesh of the tomatoes, drain the excess liquid through a cheese cloth lined plastic fine mesh sifter. I then reduce the liquid to a near syrup consistency and combine it with the tomato pulp. The concentrated tomato flavour of the reduced liquid combined with the freshness of the tomato pulp makes a sauce I really like. It's bright and clean in taste, a great contrast to any richer tasting toppings I may use. To correct my last post, I also add fresh cracked black/green/pink pepper to the tomato sauce when preparing pizza.


DW

Offline pizzaJoe

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2007, 11:19:16 AM »
Wow!   :o  You are right maybe I'll stick with the food mill.   ;)  And I thought it was cumbersome because I had to stop every four tomatoes or so to clean it out else if I add anymore, it doesn't "mill" them.

Thanks for your feedback though!   ;D

Joe
PizzaJoe

Offline dms

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Re: Seeds or no seeds?
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2007, 12:37:29 AM »
The jelly that holds the seeds is relatively high in acid content -- about twice that of the solid wall part of the tomato.  The walls hold most of the sugars and amino acids, while the skins have a large concentration of compounds that contribute to aroma.  Leaving out any part will change the flavor and aroma balance.  Whether that's good or not is a matter of personal taste.  If you're worried about the liquid content of the jelly making sauce to watery, you can can simmer the jelly and and juice until they've lost half or more of their liquid volume, and then strain that into the rest of the tomatoes.  That will restore much, but not all of the acidity. 

I don't bother -- I usually use ground peeled tomatoes.  If I'm putting more than salt and lemon juice into the tomatoes, I usually do that a day ahead, and let it sit in the fridge. 


 

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